Why does the converter/refrigerator have a plug? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-30-2012, 09:43 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
mszabo's Avatar
 
Name: Mike
Trailer: 1986 Bigfoot FT20
Michigan
Posts: 649
I think one could have installed a new Outlet quicker than it took to read this thread.
I haven't seen any refrigerators hard wired before. Either way it only matters to you.
Where I came from we call it southern engineering.
__________________

__________________
mszabo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 11:32 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
David Tilston's Avatar
 
Name: Dave W
Trailer: Trillium 4500 - 1977, 1978 (2), 1300 - 1977, 1973, and a 1972
Alberta
Posts: 5,316
Registry
In Calgary, Cowboy Engineering.
__________________

__________________
David Tilston is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 11:44 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
841K9's Avatar
 
Name: Logan
Trailer: 1976 Scamp 13'
Wisconsin
Posts: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by mszabo View Post
I think one could have installed a new Outlet quicker that it took to read this thread.
I haven't seen any refrigerators hard wired before. Either way it only matters to you.
Where I came from we call it southern engineering.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
In Calgary, Cowboy Engineering.
Something like this?
This is from a side job on Saturday~






Notice the prolific use of cut up extension cords and random boxes thrown loose behind drywall.

The worst part, we found more crap like that along with gas lines under the back yard.
__________________
841K9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 01:16 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Alf S.'s Avatar
 
Name: Alfred
Trailer: 2014 Escape 5.0TA / 2010 Nissan Frontier
Ontario
Posts: 3,816
Registry
Send a message via Yahoo to Alf S.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pindraak View Post
I am trying to figure out why the refrigerator in my Bigfoot 17 has a receptacle behind it for a plug, instead of just being wired directly. Since I fried the wire to the receptacle, I was thinking of just cutting the plug off and running the fridge cord directly to its breaker. I did this with my converter. Each device has its own dedicated breaker on the AC panel.

The electrical guy at Home Depot I just talked to insisted this was wrong, and that I needed to install a receptacle and plug it in there. I can't see why. The only thing I can see that is safer for a receptacle is that you can unplug it. But, if the receptacle is outside, behind an access panel, or screwed in somewhere in an inside compartment, you can't unplug it. It's much easier just to flip the breaker. If anything, it seems to me like the added connections and complications of the plug would increase fire hazard. If the appliance wire is inadequate and likely to melt or catch fire, why would a couple feet of 12/2 an outlet and a plug in between make any difference?

If anyone believes Home Depot electrical guy is right, can they explain why?
Hi: pindraak...Before we read the headlines...Family looses everything in RV fire. Take it to a RV Tech. that specializes in fridges. He'll know all the current codes for wiring in fridges. There is a reason the plugs there...and a reason you fried the wire too!!! Some things are better left to those in the know.
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie
__________________
Alf S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 04:10 AM   #19
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,063
Quote:
Originally Posted by 841K9 View Post
That is how 99% of household light fixtures are connected.
The soft, stranded wire of the fixture is wound around the house's solid copper wire and then the wire nut...

But yes, you're correct about the fridge.
I was thinking of the screw clamp on a breaker. I suppose you could tin it?
__________________
Raz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 09:54 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Name: Kevin (Ken)
Trailer: Bigfoot 17, 1988
Wisconsin
Posts: 159
I discovered the reason behind the melted wire. In my Bigfoot, pre-existing white wires are ground and black is positive! I wired all the existing wires backwards! So, the DC ground net got pumped full of juice, which could only escape through the fridge's AC ground wires, being the only ac/dc appliance. So, the 14/2 melted and the cord was fine. The cord is better. QED.

I agree with the idea about consideration for future owners... if only someone had thought of that when they made the trailer and color-coded it the opposite of what I thought was universal DC standard.
__________________
pindraak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:05 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
fusedlight's Avatar
 
Name: gary
Trailer: 16' 1998 Scamp
Minnesota
Posts: 672
Registry
In all discussions I've been seeing, the ones on brakes and this one, the color coding seems so at odds with what I've learned over the years:

With DC: Red is Positive and Black is Negative
With AC: White is Neutral and Black in Hot
With 3-Wire AC: White is Neutral, Black is Hot, and Red is Runner.

Brown wires?? In my book, the only place brown insulation should show up is in wiring audio circuits. Of course, I learned this from my Dad... and old-school EE who worked at Bell Labs for nearly 50 years. He'd poke me with a sharp stick if I screwed up the colors. And speaking of screws... if those slots on a screw didn't line up on the face plate I was in Big Trouble.
__________________
fusedlight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:10 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Name: Kevin (Ken)
Trailer: Bigfoot 17, 1988
Wisconsin
Posts: 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by P. Raz View Post
I was thinking of the screw clamp on a breaker. I suppose you could tin it?

I think the stranded wire makes a better connection on a screw clamp - breakers and grounding bars, provided it is not way smaller than the hole/channel. The hard wire only makes one line-like connection on either side of the hard wire, whereas the stranded squishes and contacts all over the place. There could be an issue that the stranded is more likely to pull loose, but nobody is going to be pulling on these wires, and you can test security by pulling after install. The one wire I am concerned about is the shore cord, so I am going to clamp it down soundly outside the box.
__________________
pindraak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:13 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Name: Kevin (Ken)
Trailer: Bigfoot 17, 1988
Wisconsin
Posts: 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusedlight View Post
In all discussions I've been seeing, the ones on brakes and this one, the color coding seems so at odds with what I've learned over the years:

With DC: Red is Positive and Black is Negative
With AC: White is Neutral and Black in Hot
With 3-Wire AC: White is Neutral, Black is Hot, and Red is Runner.

Brown wires?? In my book, the only place brown insulation should show up is in wiring audio circuits. Of course, I learned this from my Dad... and old-school EE who worked at Bell Labs for nearly 50 years. He'd poke me with a sharp stick if I screwed up the colors. And speaking of screws... if those slots on a screw didn't line up on the face plate I was in Big Trouble.
My understanding was that with DC, white and red are positive standards and black is ground. I talked to a the tech from the place where I bought my converter and panel yesterday, though, and he said there really is no standard, and you should never assume anything. To me, the smart thing would be to harmonize them all, which would only require creating a DC standard with black for hot and green for ground.
__________________
pindraak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:18 AM   #24
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,063
It's your trailer. You certainly can do what ever you wish. I hope it works out. Raz
__________________
Raz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:31 AM   #25
Moderator
 
Frederick L. Simson's Avatar
 
Name: Frederick
Trailer: Fiber Stream
California
Posts: 8,151
Registry
Send a message via AIM to Frederick L. Simson
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by fusedlight View Post
With DC: Red is Positive and Black is Negative
With AC: White is Neutral and Black in Hot
With 3-Wire AC: White is Neutral, Black is Hot, and Red is Runner.

Brown wires?? In my book, the only place brown insulation should show up is in wiring audio circuits.
In this global economy I am seeing a lot of AC wiring with Brown as "Hot" and Blue as "Neutral" with Green/Yellow stripes as "Ground" in equipment manufactured in Asia. A technician friend gave me a poem to help me remember which wires are Hot:
Quote:
Black and Brown
will put you in the Ground
__________________
Frederick - The Scaleman
1978 Fiber Stream 16 named "Eggstasy" & 1971 Compact Jr. named "Boomerang"
Frederick L. Simson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:50 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
fusedlight's Avatar
 
Name: gary
Trailer: 16' 1998 Scamp
Minnesota
Posts: 672
Registry
*sigh* What was it that President guy said?? Oh yeh... "Trust but Verify". I kind of figure with a multimeter and a signal tracer I'll be OK. Just as long as I don't have to mess with anything as nasty as the Lucas wiring that was on an old '72 Land Rover that my ex had!
__________________
fusedlight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:59 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
mszabo's Avatar
 
Name: Mike
Trailer: 1986 Bigfoot FT20
Michigan
Posts: 649
A lesson well learn. Never assume anything when it comes to the wiring in these trailers.
One mans cobble is anothers pain in the #%^.
The lesson here is #1 what caused the wires to melt in the first place.
#2 see #1.
First thing, disconnect shore power and batteries, trace all wiring from source to panel or
power supply. Never assume anything, wire colors and or type and size mean nothing.

Something not all people know, the big box store employees usually don' t give advise on electricial installations due to the liabily. (well you told me) after there house burnt down.
Although they have tried to hire retired electricians to assist customers. Seek that person out.
The best thing one could do is buy the basic book on electrical. This will give you the tools to better understand how ac / dc work.

To answer the question, why a plug. A plug makes sure the polarity is maintained, hench
Your plug has two different sizes and a ground.

Glad you found the problem and no further damage was done.
__________________
mszabo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 10:59 AM   #28
Member
 
sparky1's Avatar
 
Name: richie
Trailer: Casita patriot deluxe (sold)
Virginia
Posts: 98
White should NEVER be HOT in any way. in a DC circuit.

Black or Red should be From A positive source.(hot) in a DC circuit.
........................................;.
AC circuits are totally Different, consult (National Electrical code).
But it's your trailer, hope you don't destroy it or Hurt your self, RV repair Techs are NOT Certified Electricians.
__________________

__________________
sparky1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
refrigerator


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Marine plug Jim Hovind Plumbing | Systems and Fixtures 14 02-18-2013 03:30 PM
A Better RV Plug DavidSo Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 17 11-25-2011 07:17 PM
Can't get at my frost plug ROIDON L Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 10-06-2009 02:20 PM
Plug Identification Christi W Electrical | Charging, Systems, Solar and Generators 7 11-16-2006 07:06 PM
Bargman Plug Norm Roy Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 4 04-12-2006 09:33 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.