Wood Rot in Scamp 13 Floor. - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-22-2015, 08:48 PM   #15
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Name: Sarah
Trailer: 1984 13' Scamp named "Ramblin Rose"
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Yes, my goal has been to fix it right, and not have to do any of it it again for a LONG time

Of course that means I bought my scamp back in June of last year, and I've still yet to use it, because I've found problem after problem, and my "to do" list kept expanding for quite some time (often what felt like exponentially). However, I am confident at this point that in the end that I will have a trailer I can enjoy for a long time without major issues, rather than one that will be a colossal PITA for the foreseeable future. I still have a few relatively major things to tackle on my list, but once those are done the rest are mostly small jobs and my goal is to get this thing on the road before I reach that one year point in ownership
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Old 03-24-2015, 09:06 AM   #16
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Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
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When I replaced my floors I fiberglassed the entire top, bottom , and sides of the panels with 6.5 oz. fiber glass cloth and epoxy that I bought off ebay.
If I were to do a patch I might fiberglass the patches before I installed then and then fiberglass them to the remaining panels top and bottom using epoxy resin.
Yesterday I had a chance to look at the new rear floor I installed Sunday and found that the leak that killed my old floor was coming along the right side of the rear window.
I plan to remove that window (along with all of the others later) and seal them with butyl rubber caulking.
At least with the complete fiberglass cover on the floor and the fiberglass bonding to the shell the water just collected along the back edge and could not penetrate to the wood.
I welded in perimeter reinforcing along the sides to help carry the loads from the shell and the plywood is screwed down in more places than the original and the floor is a little more structural and supports the sides of the shell along with the four places the shell passes over the frame rails.
I don't know if this really provides greater strength for the trailer or not, but it reinforces my highly stressed mind at the cost of a few more pounds of steel (epoxy Rustoleum galvanized primed).
I think this trailer will serve the kids after I am done with it! The frame is reinforced and epoxy primed and the floor is exterior plywood and fiberglassed both sides and edges with 6.4 oz fiberglass with epoxy resin. The rear dance floor was bonded to the shell with epoxy fiberglass and should be solid for a while!
The water that leaked at the rear window was puddled by the back wall and minding it's own business, but that needs to be sealed now.
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Old 03-24-2015, 11:59 AM   #17
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Name: RogerDat
Trailer: 77 Scamp 13
Michigan
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You are going to have a cost for "patching" compound. Or a cost for plywood to do a full repair. Bet the wood is cheaper.

You will have to replace the fiberglass "tabbing" that attaches shell to floor along the edges since that is where the rot is. Fiberglass attached to rotted wood is not good. Again repair or full replace of tabbing not much difference in materials cost.

Find the leak first! oh and fix it. One can using care work the ensolite loose from the walls to follow a leak up. The water tends to leave a distinctive track when flowing behind it. But I would suspect window or fixture as my first guess. Both best sealed with butyl tape.

Use a watering can or similar and a helper work the window in small sections. Window is most common culprit. Even clogged weep holes can lead to leaks. Or old deteriorated rubber seals. There may have been a water line that ran from the tank under the curb side seat to the sink on the street side. Fill port would be in back curb side corner. That and cord port for electric cord I see in your picture can leak.

To my way of thinking getting the seats out is the hardest part. The screws that go into that wood lip tend to be totally rusted if there has been a leak from higher up. You may have to replace some sections of that wood lip also.

None of the work is real complicated but it does tend to be time consuming and working on the floor is a little hard on bad knees or back, don't ask how I know that little detail. On the other hand once done right it should last for decades and provide a solid foundation for the flooring and the rest of the camper. A patch is just that a temporary fix that at some point you will have to "do over".
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Old 03-24-2015, 01:41 PM   #18
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Name: Sarah
Trailer: 1984 13' Scamp named "Ramblin Rose"
Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerDat View Post
A patch is just that a temporary fix that at some point you will have to "do over".
I've seen some that looked reasonably solid - braced from below, fiberglassed in on both sides, but that seems to not really be how most "patches" are typically done.

We all remember what I found when I peeled back the floor in my camper... I still haven't fixed the damage this "patch" caused (I've had a few other issues to sort out first to eliminate all possible future leaks - replacing the rear deck is coming up soon though)

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Old 03-24-2015, 05:15 PM   #19
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Trailer: Had Scamp 13', want another small trailer.
Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahspins View Post
I've seen some that looked reasonably solid - braced from below, fiberglassed in on both sides, but that seems to not really be how most "patches" are typically done.

We all remember what I found when I peeled back the floor in my camper... I still haven't fixed the damage this "patch" caused (I've had a few other issues to sort out first to eliminate all possible future leaks - replacing the rear deck is coming up soon though)

Hi Sarah,

Well, at least your patched area looks halfway clean! Both sides of my Scamp's dinette area looks like hogs have been sleeping there!

Click image for larger version

Name:	<a title=Scamp wood rot 1.jpg Views: 27 Size: 249.3 KB ID: 81716" style="margin: 2px" />

I believe everyone would like to restore their trailers to like new condition. However, there are many reason why that never happens. Lack of money, lack of skill, and failure to foresee the time and many steps required.

Is it better to "patch" a trailer that the owner can then use to take the family camping, or is it better that the trailer sits somewhere un-used, and is a drain on limited family resources?

No single correct answer, I'm sure.

Bill
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Old 03-24-2015, 08:53 PM   #20
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Bill,

Sometimes you just have to eat the elephant one bite at a time, otherwise it is overwhelming! I had no choice but to eat the whole elephant. When I found out that the shell was less than marginally attached to the frame, I began to eat the elephant. Doing a lot of studying about fiberglassing while my wife drivers herself nuts figuring out how and what to reinsulate and line the inside. I somehow got the easy part, for once. My muscle, her brain...lots of sleeplessness.

In the end we still love our little Hummingbird, even if we cuss lots!

Keep up the faith.

Bob


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Old 04-12-2015, 07:28 AM   #21
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Trailer: Scamp
Ontario
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Originally Posted by Bill Nolen View Post
Thanks Bob for the suggestions.

I'm not quite clear as to whether you are going to add the new 3/4" plywood to the bottem or top of your existing floor?

Would it make any difference in overall strength whether or not the new plywood was applied on the bottom or on the top of the old floor?

Bill
Good morning - we just bought a '79 Scamp. We've got the chassis in for a sandblasting, repair & paint. The shell is up on saw-horses in our garage. The plywood floor has been completely cut out. Question-it is better to place the plywood subfloor onto the chassis first & lower the shell onto it?.....or install the plywood in the shell, then put the completed unit onto the chassis? Thanks in advance
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Old 04-12-2015, 12:37 PM   #22
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Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
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I replaced the floor with the frame in place under the shell. Actually I removed the floor in parts.
First the front section where the frame was rusted and broken and poorly patched in places. I built a new front end from the "front of the lower floor by the door. I also added the structure for a new modified bath.



This is what it looks like from the front



Here is a picture of the main floor and the rear floor installed. I need to finish the new wheel wells and prime the steel and then fiberglass them and the plywood floors that go on either side.



I used 3/4" ish exterior plywood and fiberglassed both sides and edges with 6.5 oz.yd fiberglass and epoxy resin.
I also used structural glue to seal and bond the plywood the the primed frame along with screws through into the frame.
I am considering also fiberglassing the finished floor to frame junction because SHE WHO MUST BE OBEYED wants no bugs crawling in.
Towards that end all openings are to be sealed and tight!
Make sure you have the shell aligned with the frame and the door geometry correct before you measure, cut, install, and fiberglass the floor panels
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:34 PM   #23
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J.D., thank you very much for the informatiion and great photos of your frame, etc.

Just looking at the frame, and wheel well, has furnished me with a lot of knowledge that I didn't previous have.

I'm finally able to get around well enough, with my bum leg, that I have cleaned out the loose ice box, and the dinette seats insides of my Scamp, and am now able to view the floor a little better. So far I've been pleased that I have found much less rot than I had though was present. However, until I can scrub and really clean the plywood, I don't want to get my hopes up!

One bite at a time sounds like great advice!

Bill
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