Wood stove for 13 foot burro? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-24-2013, 10:52 AM   #15
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Regarding the Pellet Stove mentioned in a recent post, here is what the manufacturer has to say about using them in campers:

And now, the newly certified models: The Teton and The Sierra, are available to heat off-the-grid cabins, line shacks, and detached shop structures or out-buildings. The powerless pellet stove is also the perfect solution for an ice fishing house. No Clarry® Stove is to be used in homes, manufactured homes, mobile homes, motor homes or camping trailers.

I think it's probably best to invest in a great sleeping bag for the really cold nights.
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Old 03-12-2014, 07:05 PM   #16
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Idaho Scamp owner with wood stove
2014 Trip, Day 148
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Old 03-12-2014, 09:48 PM   #17
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Idaho Scamp owner with wood stove
2014 Trip, Day 148
I wish I had taken a photo of the stove. It is about the size of a shoe box, has a 3" chimney, and he built a triple wall stove pipe through the roof of the Scamp. It is designed for very small pieces of wood - the samples I saw were about 1/2" thick by 1" - 2" wide & about 1' long.

I have to admit that I'd never put a wood stove in a trailer (and I've heated my house with a wood stove since 1975) but it was a pretty slick installation.
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Old 03-12-2014, 10:14 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by john madill View Post
I think it's probably best to invest in a great sleeping bag for the really cold nights.
And good socks and a warm, comfortable watch cap for the head! Everyone that been a backpacker knows, you want to sleep warm at night... cover your head.
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Old 02-15-2017, 06:51 AM   #19
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I just found this thread which was started a few years ago and was wondering what kind of heater you ended up using. I also have a 13 ft burro used only during the winter. I do not want a furnace which requires electricity. I need to use my 12 volts for LED lights. I have used a propane Mr Heat Buddy heater with several issues. The biggest being that it is not vented to the outside and a lot of moisture accumulates. Even tho the burro is far from airtight, I turn the Buddy off when I go to sleep, due to CO concerns. Interior of Burro then gets very cold but no problems because I am in a good sleeping bag. When I wake up, I reach across and light Buddy for a few minutes and things warm up. The problem is that all the moisture created while burning propane the previous evening has frozen on the inside of the burro and particularly on the door seals and latch, making it very difficult and sometimes impossible to open the door. Cant even force open from the inside. There are "gravity" propane heaters on the market which vent outside and have no blower however I have not found one that will easily install onto the burro. What did you ever do to heat your burro? Thanks
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Old 02-15-2017, 07:34 AM   #20
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I'll second post #2, combined with a good solar array and upgraded battery(ies). The whole deal- furnace and solar- would likely still be cheaper, easier to install and seal, and take up less space than a marine-rated wood stove.

Getting up on a really cold morning and restarting a woodstove is work, not vacation! And where are you going to get wood? To burn well, it needs to be split and seasoned... What about burn restrictions? Some places it's not just in towns and cities that burning wood is restricted or banned.

Speaking of which, it's about time to get mine going before the family wakes up...

Posted from my laptop wearing a sweatshirt and cap on a chilly morning.
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Old 02-15-2017, 08:52 AM   #21
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There are several different woodstoves made for use in fiberglass boats.

As to where does one get wood.... Most campgrounds sell wood as do many grocery stores and hardware stores. Also you can find it at stores that sell wood stoves. Some of the marine wood stoves (but not all) can also use the pressed wood logs. Those are quite handy as you can split off a chunk of it the right size to fit into the firebox. That is much easier to do than cutting a piece of firewood to a shorter length.

If you really want a wood stove it is certainly a viable and achievable option.
But just remember they don't have large fireboxes so that means waking up a couple of times a night to feed it wood.
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Old 02-15-2017, 09:10 AM   #22
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We heat our home with wood , have for over 30 years.
Buying firewood at a gas station / convenience store is not economically feasible unless you are talking about only occasional use. A propane furnace is much safer , easier to control and more cost efficient for heating a small area.
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Old 02-15-2017, 09:15 AM   #23
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My experience with campground firewood, in a word: garbage! Unseasoned, undesirable species, small diameter, lots of bark,... Same with the stuff you find at grocery stores, convenience stores, hardware stores, etc. Really expensive, too.

With a little help from a supply of seasoned heartwood juniper kindling I always bring with me, I can get some kind of campfire going with it, but in a small wood stove for a clean burn and reliable, even heat?...

Unless you're taking the trailer to a place where you can put up your own supply of firewood or work with a good local woodcutter, finding decent fuel wood will be a problem.
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Old 02-15-2017, 09:20 AM   #24
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I would only go with a woodstove if I were living in my camper year round. But I'd love to have one, all the same. It would definitely be more work. But in the north, in the winter, it's the only way to go. Propane wouldn't cut it. If you're living in your camper in the north in the winter, you have all sorts of concerns, and would need to be pretty darn competent, and so finding wood would just be another part of it. Totally do-able for that kind of person.

It somehow seems to make more sense in a tiny house on a trailer than in a camper trailer. But for the right situation, I think it would be great in a camper.
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Old 02-15-2017, 11:00 AM   #25
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http://cubicminiwoodstoves.com/
For use in small spaces including tiny houses and RVs. However for fiberglass trailers you will likely want to use the fittings made for marine wood stoves for the through the roof chimney. Or another option is to work with a local fabricator who works in stainless steel. One of the customers had his local muffler shop fabricate a chimney.
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Old 02-15-2017, 11:33 AM   #26
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I put a small wood stove in by boat and used it for a season. It's hard to get a very small wood stove to burn correctly. Wood is a very messy situation with lots of smoke and debris. It also takes up a lot of room as fuel and it's high maintenance with splitting, storing and tending the fire. I tried coal too as it takes up less space.

The chimney part is easy. Just a stainless steel patch in the roof and a 3" vent pipe passing through a 3" hole. Then a heat proof shield against the wall and one to support it from underneath are absolutely critical. Then a combustion air source.

The length of the chimney on mine was about 3'. If needed, you could slip on an extension piece after you park.

Eventually, I got tired of the hassle and changed mine to a diesel burner. That worked beautifully.
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Old 02-15-2017, 11:39 AM   #27
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I had a "cottage" wood-burning pot-belly stove in my living room ( 28' X 12' ).
The fire was either too hot or had died. It would only take small pieces of wood that had to be cut down to no more than 10". Required constant attention.
Then my home insurance company demanded to see that it had been installed with permits and inspection ( previous owner neglected to do that ). I went to city hall and got the requirements. It basically had to be set on a 3' X 3' concrete pad and needed clearance all round.
While cutting down 2" X 4" scraps for fuel, with an electric table saw, I realized it would be much easier to use that electricity to run a heater than a saw.
I tore out the stove and haven't missed it for a minute.
Imagine trying to maintain clearances and even heat in a 13" trailer.
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Old 02-15-2017, 11:52 AM   #28
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Imagine trying to maintain clearances and even heat in a 13" trailer.
It doesn't seem doable in any practical or safe way.
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