You Can Repair Fiberglass - Page 9 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-31-2015, 09:16 AM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdickens View Post
If you use a jigsaw, there is a blade available (ACE Hardware), that cuts on the downstroke.

Most jigsaw blades cut on the upstroke, but I hear that might lift and splinter the finished
(i. e. the gelcoat) edge. You might be able to minimize the gelcoat edge damage by putting
blue "painter's tape" along the edged of the intended cut?

Ray
I have used those blades lots, especially on laminate counter tops, and they work quite well, and do leave a cleaner surface cut on materials that splinter harshly. You do however have to use a strong steady hand on the jigsaw, as the blade pushes away from the surface, and can bounce the saw out of the hole.

I did try to use one when doing my hatch, and abandoned it, as it really grabbed easy on the fibreglass, causing it to bounce the thin trailer shell quite a bit. Instead, I used a good sharp finer blade, and used sandpaper to nicely clean the edges. The wee bit of chipping you might get would only be an issue if you needed to leave an exposed edge you need a perfect finish on.
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Old 03-31-2015, 01:57 PM   #114
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Thanks, Jim!
Good to know! 😊

I may want to cut some access holes into some of the interior cabinets someday soon.
I had been wondering about Roto-zips, Dremels, vibrating tools jigsaws, etc.

Ray


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Old 03-31-2015, 02:22 PM   #115
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Thanks for the advice everyone.

Looks like I just put several new tools on the wish list.
Wade
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Old 04-13-2015, 12:12 AM   #116
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fiberglass for added structural support?

Quote:
Originally Posted by D White View Post
Hi…My name is Dave and I love FIBERGLASS. I have been working on show quality Corvettes for 35 years and I’m wondering if there is any useful information I have learned in that time that I could pass on to this great forum. We are currently reconfiguring a Uhaul for a client which promises to be quite a build in the steam punk genre. This Uhaul is in remarkably good condition, but requires lots of patching and fiberglass work. It will be a perfect subject for this forum.
First of all, I believe anyone can make a satisfactory fiberglass repair. It doesn’t require much for tools, or specialized anything. I will document some work in this thread done with basic understanding. Yes there are other ways, methods, tools etc. I encourage others with differing methods to start a thread with those ideas. The more information, the better. I don’t know everything, and use this information at your own risk.
I start off with safety. You MUST ALWAYS use the following safety items as a minimum.
Dust masks
Eye protection
Nitrile gloves or better
Long sleeve shirts or tyvek coveralls
I know there will be lots of reaction to the following statement, but don’t waste your money on epoxy. I love epoxy and use lots of it, but you don’t need anything but regular old polyester fiberglass resin. I have 35 year old repairs still looking good with it. We use vinlyester resin, for many reasons, but you don’t have to and it may be hard for you to get. “tooling” resin would be a step up also. The problem with epoxy is that is does stick better, but nothing sticks to it except epoxy unless strict procedures are followed. You don’t have the time or the money for it, and you don’t need it if you follow the following two rules EVERY time
1. YOU ARE WEARING SAFETY EQUIPMENT AREN’T YOU? You must have a clean surface. Before starting a repair, clean all foreign material off with a razor blade then wipe with acetone. You may now start sanding the repair area with at least 80 grit, (40 is even easier). Use a sander, or do it by hand, but sand the heck out of it. It MUST be rough. After sanding, again wipe all dust and debris off with acetone. IF IT’S CLEAN AND ROUGH, IT WILL STICK.
2. SAFELY cut your mat (don’t use weave (cloth), your trailer was made with mat. When you are ready, mix your resin according to the directions on the can in a body shop style plastic cup or an grocery store style paper bowl, NOTHING ELSE. No cottage cheese container, yogurt container, pop container, or any other thing. Plasticers from other receptacles can melt into the resin and cause you problems, and you won’t know why. Yes I know other people have done it, but don’t you. Paper cereal bowls are cheap and become better after the resin has cured in them. You are now ready to patch, depending on what repair you have. I will start off with small and if it is useful to the forum, we’ll move to more complicated. If you have fresh resin and catalyst, mix it correctly and follow the above, it will work…YOU CAN DO IT!
If I can figure out how to post pictures, we will have specific information in the next few days
Okay Dave, I have read through this forum hoping someone already asked my question but didn't see it here...love your threads/posts by the way...

I have some minor diy fiberglassing experience repairing a small boat so I am familiar with some of this already but picked up a lot of great information here...anyway, my wife and I are restoring to like new condition with some layout modifications to suite our needs of our 1971 boler which I have a separate thread on...the po installed an Doemetic roof A/C in place of an vent, cutting the vent bigger than needed and putting a 3'x3' piece of untreated plywood in between the ac and the fiberglass roof in 2012...needless to say the fiberglass thickness wasnt meant for the 75 lbs of ac unit. The wood had rotten & had some leaking so we removed the ac to discover the sagging roof...I am planning to reinforce the roof to support the a/c unit and had thought about wood support from the inside to handle the a/c but don't want to lower our headroom as I am 5'9" and already hit my head on the ac a couple of times before we removed it....

I was thinking of beefing up the roof by fiberglassing 2 to 3" ribs around the a/c hole (square) and a couple of reinforcing strips of fiberglass continuing down to each side wall from the front and back of the opening. I was thinking about 1/4" thickness minimum to maybe 3/8". I also thought of maybe incorporating some thin wood inside the ribs as like I saw in the cabinet left of the entrance door when cutting a wider opening to accommodate a refridgerator, and the wood appears to be about 1/8" thick...

Any ideas on this structural reinforcement of my roof to hold the ac?
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:31 AM   #117
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Originally Posted by Johnny M View Post
Okay Dave, I have read through this forum hoping someone already asked my question but didn't see it here...love your threads/posts by the way...

I have some minor diy fiberglassing experience repairing a small boat so I am familiar with some of this already but picked up a lot of great information here...anyway, my wife and I are restoring to like new condition with some layout modifications to suite our needs of our 1971 boler which I have a separate thread on...the po installed an Doemetic roof A/C in place of an vent, cutting the vent bigger than needed and putting a 3'x3' piece of untreated plywood in between the ac and the fiberglass roof in 2012...needless to say the fiberglass thickness wasnt meant for the 75 lbs of ac unit. The wood had rotten & had some leaking so we removed the ac to discover the sagging roof...I am planning to reinforce the roof to support the a/c unit and had thought about wood support from the inside to handle the a/c but don't want to lower our headroom as I am 5'9" and already hit my head on the ac a couple of times before we removed it....

I was thinking of beefing up the roof by fiberglassing 2 to 3" ribs around the a/c hole (square) and a couple of reinforcing strips of fiberglass continuing down to each side wall from the front and back of the opening. I was thinking about 1/4" thickness minimum to maybe 3/8". I also thought of maybe incorporating some thin wood inside the ribs as like I saw in the cabinet left of the entrance door when cutting a wider opening to accommodate a refridgerator, and the wood appears to be about 1/8" thick...

Any ideas on this structural reinforcement of my roof to hold the ac?
This is a great question, but I will need to see pictures.....Fiberglass Dave
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Old 04-14-2015, 01:12 AM   #118
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Originally Posted by D White View Post
This is a great question, but I will need to see pictures.....Fiberglass Dave
Hey Dave, thanks for the reply...Here is the only picture I have at the moment of the roof area, the roof was sagging a little when I removed the ac and plywood allowing water to pool up slightly rather than run off.

My thoughts were to fiberglass mat strips to the inside making a square around this area one layer at a time and continue the rear side and tongue side of the square area across to the sides of the trailer and have them blend in to where the sides meet the roof so it looks like it was molded that way when done.

I planned to accomplish this by putting slight pressure on the roof from the inside using temporary vertical wood supports & c clamps to shape the roof back to the dome shape eliminating the sagging and fiberglassing until I have enough mat in place to support the roof for the a/c weight. The other reason for the extra support is that I also would rather remount the a/c without the plywood.

As I said in previous post I thought about adding some wood strips to the fiberglass layers to add more strength or do you think that is not necessary?
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Old 04-14-2015, 02:54 AM   #119
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I've done a lot of FG work but am no expert although you do find 1/8" luan ply glassed in between many spots of a FG build for strength. I don't think just that or strips would give you enough support for an AC unit...could be wrong on that. Might be the PO had the right idea and just didn't go far enough for a good mod. Possibly glassing in 1/4 or 3/8ths ply to the roof side to side would give you enough to carry the load without any distortion to the shell and still keep the interior clearance you have. The roof line would be a bit different but if it works for you.....Anyway, just my 2 cents for you and worth both pennies .
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Old 04-15-2015, 11:05 AM   #120
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Originally Posted by Johnny M View Post
Hey Dave, thanks for the reply...Here is the only picture I have at the moment of the roof area, the roof was sagging a little when I removed the ac and plywood allowing water to pool up slightly rather than run off.

My thoughts were to fiberglass mat strips to the inside making a square around this area one layer at a time and continue the rear side and tongue side of the square area across to the sides of the trailer and have them blend in to where the sides meet the roof so it looks like it was molded that way when done.

I planned to accomplish this by putting slight pressure on the roof from the inside using temporary vertical wood supports & c clamps to shape the roof back to the dome shape eliminating the sagging and fiberglassing until I have enough mat in place to support the roof for the a/c weight. The other reason for the extra support is that I also would rather remount the a/c without the plywood.

As I said in previous post I thought about adding some wood strips to the fiberglass layers to add more strength or do you think that is not necessary?

I went out to the lot and took a really good look at a customer's Boler we have waiting for a redo. I do not see a way to use an air conditioner
in this instance. I would advise against it. If you feel you must and the plywood was working, you could fill the low spot with fiberglass and enclose some plywood on all sides with fiberglass to replace the rotted piece and put it back the way it was. I feel weight is too much....sorry I couldn't help and of course, this is just one opinion, others may have an idea for you
Fiberglass Dave
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Old 04-16-2015, 05:02 PM   #121
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Dave, thanks so very much for this thread. I feel like I can tackle the repairs on my Boler now!

To Johnny, the roof on a Boler was never meant to support an ac unit. Many have had success with mounting a small unit near the floor in the closet or under one of the benches. Also there is a nice split unit someone put on the tongue of their camper. I suggest you stay away from roof mounts, as you know, they are troublesome.

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Old 04-16-2015, 06:04 PM   #122
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This is how Trillium did a factory roof mounted air conditioner. Note the supports in the kitchen, and the saddle that the A/C sits on.
Mi (US) - 1979 - Trillium 1300 - ebay auction
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Old 04-25-2015, 09:04 PM   #123
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Originally Posted by Johnny M View Post
Hey Dave, thanks for the reply...Here is the only picture I have at the moment of the roof area, the roof was sagging a little when I removed the ac and plywood allowing water to pool up slightly rather than run off.

My thoughts were to fiberglass mat strips to the inside making a square around this area one layer at a time and continue the rear side and tongue side of the square area across to the sides of the trailer and have them blend in to where the sides meet the roof so it looks like it was molded that way when done.

I planned to accomplish this by putting slight pressure on the roof from the inside using temporary vertical wood supports & c clamps to shape the roof back to the dome shape eliminating the sagging and fiberglassing until I have enough mat in place to support the roof for the a/c weight. The other reason for the extra support is that I also would rather remount the a/c without the plywood.

As I said in previous post I thought about adding some wood strips to the fiberglass layers to add more strength or do you think that is not necessary?
Johnny you may consider a mobile unit. I picked up a Danby DPA110DHA1CP off kijiji for $60.00. It's 11000btu A/C, 9000btu heat and a dehumidifier. I'm going to mount it in the closet.
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Old 04-26-2015, 08:12 AM   #124
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I bought a Comfort-Aire DVH9 heat pump mini-split to go on my rebuild of the 1986 16' Scamp. The compressor will go on the extended tongue and so far I am planning on installing the inside unit (16 lbs.) over the back window. This keeps the weight low and although I would prefer the compressor closer to the axle it is at least between the wheels and tow car and low. The mounting angle iron will be below the frame rails to lower the weight another 3".
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Old 04-27-2015, 09:41 PM   #125
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I have 3-4 teeny tiny holes in our fiberglass camper. I mean very small like where a rock hit it at a high speed or something. They are all the way through the fiberglass. Hubby bought a fiberglass patch kit to repair the two areas at the top where the awning was. I was wondering IF I could just put a dab of the fiberglass on these little holes and it work without the mat stuff since they are sooo small. Then also what kind of paint will we need to repaint these areas so they will match the other paint?



Once I started reading more on this thread I found where someone had asked about small screw holes. So I'll find some epoxy and hubby probably has some if I am remembering right. I think I saw some in one of my kitchen drawers. You have to mix the stuff.
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Old 04-28-2015, 08:57 PM   #126
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Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
This is how Trillium did a factory roof mounted air conditioner. Note the supports in the kitchen, and the saddle that the A/C sits on.
Mi (US) - 1979 - Trillium 1300 - ebay auction
Thanks David, good info on how they did this...still trying to figure out my dilemma on how to accomplish this on the Boler...

And we have considered the closed install as mentioned also but we have a refrigerator going in there and plans for a toaster oven & cabinet space...
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