1978 Boler Complete Restoration / Rebuild - Page 12 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-14-2013, 01:47 AM   #155
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Trailer: Bigfoot 13'
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could an expert on heating and cooling, please help us eliminate the urban myth from reality. My Bigfoot has Poor insulated rat fur. It has single pane windows, no insulation in the compartments at the floor,or behind the sink or heater or stove, or the floor. The ceiling has an air vent with 1/8" plastic to hold in the heat or cool. I have read that if there is a non insulated area in the ceiling of a house, that the heat will pour out of this area, as if there, were a real hole in the ceiling. Those of us that are disadvantaged, by too much height, placing an R19 insulation, on the egg ceiling, will cause you to duck even more! ( on the roof, it will just blow away ). On the floor an expert will know!!!

Later Kenny
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Old 07-14-2013, 02:47 AM   #156
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Trailer: 1978 Boler
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Originally Posted by Kenny Strong View Post
could an expert on heating and cooling, please help us eliminate the urban myth from reality. My Bigfoot has Poor insulated rat fur. It has single pane windows, no insulation in the compartments at the floor,or behind the sink or heater or stove, or the floor. The ceiling has an air vent with 1/8" plastic to hold in the heat or cool. I have read that if there is a non insulated area in the ceiling of a house, that the heat will pour out of this area, as if there, were a real hole in the ceiling. Those of us that are disadvantaged, by too much height, placing an R19 insulation, on the egg ceiling, will cause you to duck even more! ( on the roof, it will just blow away ). On the floor an expert will know!!!

Later Kenny


We're trying to over-engineer!
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Old 07-14-2013, 08:24 AM   #157
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As I've mentioned before, we got nice quality plywood for our subfloor that is 3/4" thick, and has an A side (nice) and a C side (not so nice). I wanted the A side so I don't have to sand it and can easily lay the final flooring on top without much fussing.
Most AC plywood glue does not have an exterior rating. That means it can delaminate if it gets wet. Plywood with exterior rated glue has an X in the designation, for example CDX has a C side, and a D side and exterior (waterproof) glue.
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:44 PM   #158
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Most AC plywood glue does not have an exterior rating. That means it can delaminate if it gets wet. Plywood with exterior rated glue has an X in the designation, for example CDX has a C side, and a D side and exterior (waterproof) glue.
Thanks Andy! I plan to coat the ply with epoxy paint to seal it. Also, the goal is to prevent water leakage inside. When we bought our Boler the water damage was total and mold was all over...
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Old 07-15-2013, 09:28 PM   #159
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British Columbia
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Thanks Theresa and Thomas! We definitely will be learning a lot of skills on this project, and indeed the list of supplies is endless...
Hi Slav and heather,
We bought a Boler last year and restored a lot of the interior. Taking it to Winnipeg from Vancouver last week, we made it as far as Salmon Arm -- the trailer has a cracked frame. We had to leave the trailer there and continue, but it's in storage and we will pick it up on the way home. In the meantime, the RV place in Salmon Arm is estimating that it will cost $3,500 to $4,000 to take the shell off and put a new frame in place. Reading your post so far, it seems excessive, although at $109 per hour, that's about 35 hours plus materials. We are considering putting it on a traiuler and taking it back to White Rock and doing some of this ourselves, farming out the construction of a new frame -- or the fixing of the old one. Did you complete the job of putting it back on the frame? Was it difficult. Do you think that two relatively handy-with-tools people could handle the job? Thanks in advance for any advice. So far we have put in about $6,500 on this trailer and a lot of personal work. We really, really like the Boler, but adding on $4,000 is a tad daunting. What do you think?
Val
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Old 07-15-2013, 10:38 PM   #160
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Hi Slav and heather,
We bought a Boler last year and restored a lot of the interior. Taking it to Winnipeg from Vancouver last week, we made it as far as Salmon Arm -- the trailer has a cracked frame. We had to leave the trailer there and continue, but it's in storage and we will pick it up on the way home. In the meantime, the RV place in Salmon Arm is estimating that it will cost $3,500 to $4,000 to take the shell off and put a new frame in place. Reading your post so far, it seems excessive, although at $109 per hour, that's about 35 hours plus materials. We are considering putting it on a traiuler and taking it back to White Rock and doing some of this ourselves, farming out the construction of a new frame -- or the fixing of the old one. Did you complete the job of putting it back on the frame? Was it difficult. Do you think that two relatively handy-with-tools people could handle the job? Thanks in advance for any advice. So far we have put in about $6,500 on this trailer and a lot of personal work. We really, really like the Boler, but adding on $4,000 is a tad daunting. What do you think?
Val
Hi Val,

Sorry to hear you guys have a cracked frame. That seems to be a common issue with these old Bolers. Ours didn't seem cracked but it was completely rusted and bent in a few places, so getting a new frame with modifications done was the smartest option.

I think you're getting quoted way too much. Of course if someone else takes the whole thing apart it will run you more.

Here is what I'd recommend. You will probably need to remove all the stuff from the inside to reduce the weight and the risk of structural breakage of the egg while removing it from the frame. Get yourself a few cinder blocks and two 4x4x8 beams. You will need two car jacks - because they rise only so far, we found that bricks stacked under the jacks allowed us to achieve the height we needed to lift the body.

You need to lift in stages - front, then back, and back and forth. And make sure you remove bolts holding the body to the frame before you do any of the lifting. You don't want to be under there when the whole thing is in the air because that frame is going to drop out.

My estimate is that when completely empty, the fiberglass shell is 200-300 lbs. I found that I was able to lift the front or back by myself a few inches while my wife would adjust the blocks/beams. I'm not a weight lifter, but we managed. If you can get friends to help a bit, it would be easier (like a couple guys holding two corners while you positioned the supports).

What year is your Boler? The older ones don't have the same bottom edge/lip, so you can't rest the weight of the shell on the corners. Ours has thick bottom edges, so it was easier. You would just need to use shorter beams, or even planks of wood to distribute the weight when lifting.

If you guys can do all that, find a weld shop that has experience with welding large projects like this and have them match the frame with extra supports. It should run you about $1000-1500 with all the materials. If you need a new axle, that will set you back about another $500.

If you follow our thread from the beginning, I tried to put as many details as possible regarding the whole process. It has been quite a learning experience and with much help on this forum, so far, it has all been doable!

I'd also recommend making a new post to ask for weld shops in your area if you don't know of one. From following this forum I know lots of people in BC have had new frames made (by shops or themselves or friends/family), so people should chime in. You may want to post both in Boler and Scamp forums.

If you have other questions, feel free to ask!

Best,
Slav
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:08 AM   #161
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Floor - Getting there...

Where does the time go? Finally got to put some more work into the rebuild of our Boler. Continuing on the subfloor: Since everything is round and just about nothing level, a lot more effort went into cutting all the pieces of the puzzle. Small adjustments and fine tuning kept the work slow, but I'm pretty happy with the way it worked out.

Again, we're using 3/4" A/C sided plywood for the subfloor. In the pics that follow nothing is yet assembled with glue and wood screws. That's to follow...so here we go.

Here are a couple overall views through the front and rear windows:

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The entrance (I still need to fine tune the left side):

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Another broader view from the entrance:

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Here is the area in the front where the porta potti will be located (there is no structural support under the floor, just fiberglass, so I'm making the floor double thick here and it will essentially be supported by the sides and the two "humps"...wouldn't want the user to fall thru the floor! ):

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And finally, the tools of the trade and the mess of sawdust everywhere!

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Next I'll remove everything and paint it with the same gray epoxy paint I used on the FG to give the wood a seal against moisture and all that's associated with it. Then it can be installed and bolted to the frame.
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Old 07-23-2013, 07:11 AM   #162
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Looks pretty doggone good to me. I think that I will stick to 1/2". I doubt if the 3/4 would make a difference for me unless there a previous threads that advocate a thicker floor. I dont have a height problem (thanks to my 4'8" mom). Lots of wood working. I would guess that two humps will support two bumps. JMO. What brand epoxy are you using?
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Old 07-23-2013, 09:47 AM   #163
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That floor looks fab! Almost good enough to stain and call it good... no need for anything over the top!
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Old 07-23-2013, 02:08 PM   #164
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Looks pretty doggone good to me. I think that I will stick to 1/2". I doubt if the 3/4 would make a difference for me unless there a previous threads that advocate a thicker floor. I dont have a height problem (thanks to my 4'8" mom). Lots of wood working. I would guess that two humps will support two bumps. JMO. What brand epoxy are you using?
Thanks Mike. I went with the thicker ply because of the thin FG floor. If you don't have that issue, 1/2" should be totally sufficient.

The epoxy paint details are in my post #109.
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Old 07-23-2013, 02:09 PM   #165
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That floor looks fab! Almost good enough to stain and call it good... no need for anything over the top!
Donna, that would be tempting! The grain is beautiful in these boards, isn't it?!
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Old 08-28-2013, 01:28 AM   #166
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Floor - Finished?...Just About!

I wanted to post an update on the whole subfloor installation. It is just about complete; I still have the small section on the left of the entry door that is giving me grief due to the weird shape of the wheel well. But here is the progress report in pictures!

After cutting the pieces and dry assembling them, I removed everything and coated the underside and edges with two coats of the same epoxy paint mentioned in an earlier post:

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All the vertical pieces needed to be screwed together from the UNDERSIDE to the primary floor piece:

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Next, the puzzle of pieces was assembled inside the rig and all things got carefully joined up with wood screws:

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A few detail shots:

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Where the porta-potti will reside:

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Right side at the entrance:

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In terms of securing the whole egg to the frame, we had six reinforced tabs welded to the frame. One at each corner (as the original design had it) and two in the middle for good measure.

The bolts are all galvanized: 4 main ones are 1/2" in diameter by 2.5" in length. The 2 middles ones are 3/8" in diameter and 2" in length. I'm using two large washers and a lock washer on each of the bolts:

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The top surfaces of the subfloor were painted with two coats of epoxy paint, just like the underside. After bolting the egg to the frame, I used paintable 35 year caulking all the way around the perimeter of the floor and also at the joints of all the pieces. Because there is a trough around the whole inside under the floor I want things to be water tight. I hope to never have to do this floor again!

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Once the caulking cured I got it painted the same as the rest of the floor. Here you have a couple final shots of how things turned out. There are a couple less perfect spots, but overall I'm very pleased how it turned out.

Looking to the back:

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And to the front:

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Old 08-28-2013, 03:30 AM   #167
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Personally I would have used 40 year caulking - regardless this is a thing of beauty!. Great job Slav. Its sure coming together nicely.

What brand paint did you use?
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:49 AM   #168
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Personally I would have used 40 year caulking - regardless this is a thing of beauty!. Great job Slav. Its sure coming together nicely.

What brand paint did you use?
Thanks Mike! I really wanted the 50 year version but they were out of stock!

For the paint, it is Seal Krete Epoxy-Seal in the "slate gray" color. Picked it up at Lowe's but Home Depot also carries it. A good pic of the can is in my post #109.

Slav
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