Broken Frame - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-23-2016, 05:07 AM   #15
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Frame Failure

The bend is a weak point in the frame. It should have been reinforced when built. Both sides will need to be reinforced. I would reinforce the frame all the way to Scamp's reinforcement (where the frame comes out from under the trailer). We added fishtales to the front side of Scamp's reinforcement piece as well.

Our reinforcement extends back from the front of Scamp's reinforcement to the point where the tubing doubles up.

All work was done from under the trailer.
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Old 06-23-2016, 05:11 AM   #16
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Frame Failure

The bend is a weak point in the frame. It should have been reinforced when built. Both sides will need to be reinforced. I would reinforce the frame all the way to Scamp's reinforcement (where the frame comes out from under the trailer). We added fishtales to the front side of Scamp's reinforcement piece as well.

Our reinforcement extends back from the front of Scamp's reinforcement to the point where the tubing doubles up.

All work was done from under the trailer. C channel was used for most of it., About the same size as the existing channel with the c facing out and extending a little below the original box beam, providing a lot of welding area/
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Old 06-23-2016, 06:28 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Borrego Dave View Post
Glenn, your comment may have some merit for unit numbers. But I think that the vast number of replies posted on any site tend to be negative of a product. If you're ticked you voice it, if you're pleased you move on to other things and rarely comment. I read a lot of reviews, add a few grains of salt, both ways and make my choice, 99% of the time it's fine. Monday/Friday build............who knows .

All designs are the result of compromise.

Criticism and complaint bring improvement.

The only one who claims perfection is the one seeking a profit.

Talk to any car saleman
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Old 06-23-2016, 09:13 AM   #18
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All designs are the result of compromise.

Criticism and complaint bring improvement.

The only one who claims perfection is the one seeking a profit.

Talk to any car saleman
Uhauls weren't..they're rugged
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Old 06-23-2016, 09:32 AM   #19
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All designs are the result of compromise...
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Originally Posted by Bruce Thomas View Post
Uhauls weren't..they're rugged
Sure they were, Bruce, just a different set of design compromises than Scamps... which U-Haul owners discover when they need a new taillight lens or wheel.
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Old 06-23-2016, 10:07 AM   #20
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Sourcing a wheel or light after30 years isn't a compromise...flimsy trailers are though. Thing is, all they compromise is your safety and investment.
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Old 06-23-2016, 10:29 AM   #21
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Reinforcing the frame at the bend before it breaks is a good idea for people who put many miles on their rigs. That is a structurally awkward joint for the frame members. It has to absorb millions of fatigue cycles while resisting twisting and bending. That is a hinge point that is supported by the trailer body up to that bend where it then cantilevers out to the hitch. By adding reinforcing before failure you would extend life to the trailer, or maybe move the failure point to a different spot if not done correctly. I have not done our Scamp due to not traveling far from home and having good pavement where we go. It's a 2003 with low miles.
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Old 06-23-2016, 10:54 AM   #22
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Sourcing a wheel or light after30 years isn't a compromise...flimsy trailers are though. Thing is, all they compromise is your safety and investment.
I hardly think a lightweight frame that fails after 27 years of use, environmental exposure, and, likely, neglect constitutes reckless endangerment of anyone's safety or investment. Regular inspection, maintenance, and, if indicated, repair of a trailer frame is part of prudent ownership of an older trailer.

In any case, reinforcing a Scamp frame is no more trouble than the fiberglass work required to fit a new taillight unit into a U-Haul. And any competent welder can do it.
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Old 06-23-2016, 11:07 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by ruscal View Post
Reinforcing the frame at the bend before it breaks is a good idea for people who put many miles on their rigs. That is a structurally awkward joint for the frame members. It has to absorb millions of fatigue cycles while resisting twisting and bending. That is a hinge point that is supported by the trailer body up to that bend where it then cantilevers out to the hitch. By adding reinforcing before failure you would extend life to the trailer, or maybe move the failure point to a different spot if not done correctly. I have not done our Scamp due to not traveling far from home and having good pavement where we go. It's a 2003 with low miles.
Russ
Your Scamp is made from a stronger tubing than early trailers so I doubt you have anything to be concerned about. I have seen several broken frames over time on several makes of trailer but the problem is rare , even on older intrinsically weaker frames. My 2004 Scamp13D runs a higher than required tongue weight and has much higher than average towed miles on it with no sign of any frame issues.
Of course anything put together sooner or later falls apart.
There are many other issues which also deserve diligence and regular inspection before every trip, of course this is true of the TV as well...
(Yes... even if you drive a pacific rim icon!)
Another factor which in fairness should be addressed....
Everyone knows someone who seems to have a special talent which gives them the supernatural ability to destroy an anvil with a rubber mallet.
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Old 06-23-2016, 11:47 AM   #24
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I think that the frame should have had a beam between the bent knees tying them together and reducing the flex along with reinforcement plates on the outsides.
Also gussets add a lot of strength with little extra weight.


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Old 06-23-2016, 12:21 PM   #25
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I think that the frame should have had a beam between the bent knees tying them together and reducing the flex along with reinforcement plates on the outsides.
Also gussets add a lot of strength with little extra weight.


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Have you done that yet?
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Old 06-23-2016, 01:01 PM   #26
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When I rebuilt my Scamp 16 I reentered the front to extend the frame bad I did add the cross brace and reinforcements.
I was there due to cracked frame members on my 1986 Scamp.
The new front was made from heavy gauge steel tubing with a lots of modifications to add strength and stiffness.
Some weight as well.
Of course the new front bath etc did not save any weight either.


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Old 06-23-2016, 01:04 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
I hardly think a lightweight frame that fails after 27 years of use, environmental exposure, and, likely, neglect constitutes reckless endangerment of anyone's safety or investment. Regular inspection, maintenance, and, if indicated, repair of a trailer frame is part of prudent ownership of an older trailer.

In any case, reinforcing a Scamp frame is no more trouble than the fiberglass work required to fit a new taillight unit into a U-Haul. And any competent welder can do it.
you keep thinking a frame repair isn't tougher than a tail light conversion that doesn't need to be done ..they could be put anywhere...frames are critical. Most of these people don't weld and hafta hire that out.
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Old 06-23-2016, 01:29 PM   #28
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Just to add something to the discussion for archival purposes. IMHO, if you are changing the axle on an older Scamp and have a Welder involved anyway, go ahead and at least add a strip of 3/16" or 1/4" by 1 1/2" to the bottom of the front frame sections. It is cheap insurance and will probably take care of things for the life of the trailer (if you do it before it breaks). Again, IMHO. I am not an Engineer and did not stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. Just an old Farm Boy type Welder/Fabricator that has been to the Rodeo a time or twelve.
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