Fiberglass Resin Recommendations? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-08-2014, 12:39 AM   #29
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It bonds excellent to wood until it separates. I wish it would hold. Repairing failed polyester tabbing has been a nightmare for me.

Epoxy is no easier or harder to work with than any other hardener/resin.

Why use cheap material that won't last? The labor to repair it again is not worth it.
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Old 07-08-2014, 10:01 AM   #30
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It bonds excellent to wood until it separates. I wish it would hold. Repairing failed polyester tabbing has been a nightmare for me.

Epoxy is no easier or harder to work with than any other hardener/resin.

Why use cheap material that won't last? The labor to repair it again is not worth it.
You are basing your advice on a boat tabbing problem...these are trailers not boats and don't have tabbing problems. Why are trailer manufacturers still using polyester instead of epoxy? Because it works well and has for 50 plus years. The accepted repair material for these trailers is polyester, same material as they are made of. My advice is based on accepted repair procedures used throughout the industry and 38 years of professional experience using ALL resins including epoxy and many you have never even heard of. You ridicule accepted INDUSTRY standards based on nothing. I'll bet your polyester problems can even be traced back to YOU as far as materials choice and application.

Trailer people. There are several people on here that tell you the right way to repair your trailers. If ANYONE says that epoxy is the only way to go, don't listen to them. THEY DON'T KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING. You are not being cheap or doing wrong by your prized trailer. Polyester allows you to do as good a repair as any shop or repair facility by yourself in your driveway the first time without practice and without paying someone like me $125 a shop hour. It is not hard, or complicated and YOU CAN DO IT!
I am going to continually call out the epoxy only people. THERE IS NO REASON TO USE EPOXY UNLESS YOU JUST WANT TO....PERIOD
Fiberglass Dave
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Old 07-08-2014, 10:54 AM   #31
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I have much less experience than Dave W. I have never tried epoxy, except when helping my dad put a layer of epoxy on his 45' mahogany on oak sail boat, good old 711:
Alden Designs - Hart Nautical Collection, MIT Museum - Designers of Fine Yachts

I can tell you though that using polyester resin is easy. I was happy with my first project, and I now have delusions of grandeur.
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Old 07-08-2014, 11:10 AM   #32
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Fiberglass Dave. Used Poly and gauze on model airplane wings and it worked great. (Gauze as in the stuff you put on a cut)

I have a question: Epoxy and Polly - Which one will adhere to the other.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:53 PM   #33
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Fiberglass Dave. Used Poly and gauze on model airplane wings and it worked great. (Gauze as in the stuff you put on a cut)

I have a question: Epoxy and Polly - Which one will adhere to the other.
Well, this is where we get into trouble because we're dealing with molded trailers here only...I would seek advice on the model airplane forums for your best result....thanks....Fiberglass Dave
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Old 07-10-2014, 01:22 PM   #34
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I will join Fiberglass Dave is saying that I don't see any reason to repair polyester with epoxy, if you are going to laminate the repair (ie, 'wet' resin and glass).

The one advantage of epoxy to an amateur is that it bonds better to existing fiberglass, if that hasn't been properly prepared. But since properly preparing existing fiberglass only means thoroughly sanding it where it will be bonded to, this isn't a great advantage.

If it's a small hole that will be plugged with some filler, epoxy putty does make some sense - those knead-and-use epoxy putty fillers are effortless, simple and strong. But then that's not lamination.
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Old 01-25-2015, 04:56 PM   #35
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OP used bondo & primer

The OP 'cleaned up' the pop-up roof of my Compact II. He said a tree fell on it. There was lots of junk in the surface, so I got it down and went to work with the sander. I have found that there are numerous spider cracks and many old screw holes. And lots of what looks like bondo. There are many places where the gelcoat is gone.
He also used the material (bondo?) between the plates and bolts for the hinges and the roof and over the screws used to hold the wood to the roof.
I am concerned that the material will start falling out of numerous screw holes, and that the chipped gel coat and spider cracks around other screws will continue degrading unless I add some reinforcement (thru fiberglassing.)
My problem is, can I fiberglass over this bondo or do I need to remove all the old bondo? If so, recommendations for a good way to do that?
If the spider cracks are essentially repaired with bondo, should I just leave them alone?
Here are a couple of pictures of what I am dealing with.
Attached Thumbnails
roof before small 01.jpg   pop up lid 064 small.jpg  

pop up lid  070 small.jpg   pop up lid 069 small.jpg  

pop up lid 077 small.jpg  
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Old 01-25-2015, 05:53 PM   #36
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Just as a thought, as there are so many repairs and damage to cover, you might think about getting it sprayed with one of the better "Bed Liner" coatings such as "Rhino Liner"
Enter to Win Free Rhino Linings Gift Cards and Get the World's #1 Spray-on Truck Bed Liner
I had this on the bed of my Sonoma for five years and it still looked like new when sold.
You can get it in white or any color you want and I believe that they can add a flex agent to the mix. But be sure to ask how much weight it might add.
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Old 01-25-2015, 06:02 PM   #37
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The weight is a concern. I was thinking about just doing a full layer of fiberglass mat, maybe from the inside, but I'm not sure how much weight that will add. Something else to consider is what that might do to a cover that I or some future owner might use. And, would that have to be sanded off, if I didn't like the look in the future?
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Old 01-25-2015, 06:17 PM   #38
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What ever else you might do to repair the damage may well leave some evidence anyway. It will just look like a textured paint and that's a sales plus because it seems even more impervious to weather than the original fiberglass. Plus they can custom mix any matching color you might like.


When I had my truck bed sprayed I have to sign a release that what was being sprayed on was "Permanent", so ferget removal. The stuff was originally invented to coat mining equipment in South Africa, it's, basically, last forever.
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Old 01-25-2015, 06:54 PM   #39
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WEST SYSTEM | Projects | Fiberglass Boat Repair and Restoration - Polyester over epoxy
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Old 01-25-2015, 08:42 PM   #40
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This applies to Gel coat (vinyl ester) only which no one hear has much access to and is for more experienced resin people. You have clouded the issue once again for people unnecessarily with something that DOES NOT APPLY TO THE AVERAGE PERSON TRYING TO WORK ON THEIR PRIZED FIBERGLASS TRAILER.
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Old 01-25-2015, 10:18 PM   #41
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So, Dave, what is the verdict on being able to fiberglass over what was used on my pop-up lid? Unfortunately, I can't be sure of what the bondo-like material was but there is definitely some primer.
As I said, I more concerned about the material popping out of the screw holes.
Also, I enjoyed reading your thread "You can repair fiberglass" but was a little disappointed that it didn't continue with what to do after you have finished the repairs-prime & paint?
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Old 01-25-2015, 11:05 PM   #42
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Fiberglass Resin Recommendations?

I work with a far bit of fiberglass

I would suggest repairing this from both sides. Clean the bondo off as best you can. Bondo is used in the final paint prep stages. But you don't want it sandwiched as it won't help with your epoxy adhesion.

I would lay at least 1 sheet of fiberglass on each side. And just use a plastic putty spatula (best kind are the ones sold at pottery stores) to press the epoxy through the sheet into the holes.

Once cured use a fiberglass type bondo first to smooth out dips and hollows. Then finish for paint with regular bondo and then primer.

Spidering in paint is the result of wrong paint used. I recommend Endura. It isn't cheep but stays like a soft rubber after curing and will flex with the fiberglass. I have even seen it cure at the bottom of a full waste oil drum 😮


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