Flooring - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 05-23-2003, 12:44 PM   #15
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I seriously considered installing ceramic tile, my floor of choice, but opted against it due to the weight. I'm installing solid oak hardwood instead. At just under 1/4" thick, it's actually very light. Cork is considered to be a premium flooring material, and as such is pretty pricey. I've never actually seen a cork floor installed, but I understand it holds up better than you might think. Not good with spiked heels, though, for those of you who dress that way while camping...
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Old 05-23-2003, 04:09 PM   #16
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Spikes won't be an issue!

I don't need to go to nosebleed heights to find an accident waiting for me. therefore I avoid anything with too much of a heel on it. I am more concerned about dropped tools, dog toenails, hiking boots or tracked in sand, etc.

I'd love ceramic, but I need to save the weight for the books and pets and craft junk I think I need.

I did a quick search online and found the tiles for about $3 each (pricey!) and some places have a minimum order of 110 sq. feet. Floating planks come in 18 sq. foot bundles, but cost more per sq. foot.

Anyone know about how many walkable sq. feet is in a 15 foot trailer? (Still haven't picked mine up yet, so I can't measure it.)
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Old 05-23-2003, 04:13 PM   #17
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>>spiked heels

Funny you should say this, Paul.

I wear a pair of spike heels ever since my wife found a pair that weren't her size in the trailer!

Thanks for the heads about about the corkfloor!
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Old 05-23-2003, 05:14 PM   #18
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Flooring weight

Once the wheels were turning, I had to know how much different flooring options weigh.

I used www.diyflooring.com to calculate all but the ceramic and vinyl tile (which they don't sell) since it gives shipping weight if you put something in the shopping cart. (And they have the cheapest cork tiles I have seen anywhere.)

Here is what I found. Results could vary a lot depending on what brand, thickness, etc.

Ceramic tile 3.9 lbs. sq. ft.

Bamboo 2.34 lbs. per sq. ft.

Hardwood 1.6 lbs. sq. ft.

Snap together Cork tiles 1.6 lbs. sq. ft. (with fiberboard backing)

Vinyl stick on tile .87 lbs. sq. ft.

Carpet .5 lbs. sq. ft. (standard low pile)

Glue on Cork tiles .47 lbs. per sq. ft.

So, it looks like carpet and cork glue-on are the lightest, but hardwood is pretty light. Makes a big difference if you use glue-on tiles over snap-in, but that creates other issues (namely removal one day!). If thickness is an issue vinyl and glue-on cork are the best bet.

You can find cheap cork tiles online that are about the same price as stick on tiles (some as low as $2.49). So, the biggest advantages of cork are in its friendliness to the environment and the fact that it stays warmer underfoot. Carpet is by far the cheapest since remnants are usually available of a size big enough for an egg. Hardwood is so pretty it might just be worth the weight. And, if you have the tow vehicle for it, ceramic is durable and beautiful.
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Old 05-23-2003, 06:33 PM   #19
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I thought cork would be great. I got slowed down by the minimum order. I also tried to get bamboo panels for closet and cabinet doors. These are not yet readily available. You can get them in Seattle and Augusta, Maine, otherwise the shipping will kill you. I also like real linoleum. It comes in 6foot rolls. I don't know how it holds up with a lot of moisture, but it's all natural (combo of cork and linseed oil) and comes in nice colors. For now we've got indoor outdoor carpet. I think we'll end up with sheet vinyl or maybe splurge on the lino.
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Old 05-23-2003, 09:41 PM   #20
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Cost/Practicality/Beauty

Most of our trailers are pretty small when it comes to sq ft. I think you will be surprised at the lack of the cost difference. So what would twice as much be? $50 vs 25? We not talking a grand hall.

Cork is very popular and durable, but since we are talking major traffic pattern here I'd give it a hard look.

Although mine is a no wax, I do keep a matte finish sealer on it. It keeps any cracks from allowing moisture to penetrate.

I really have my doubts about the ceramic tile. Besides the weight of the tile, you would have to use a rigid backer board so that there would be zero (and I do mean absolute zero) flex. One single wrong bounce, one wrong flex and your floor would be ruined.

Don't get me wrong. I adore natural stone, I just don't think it has an application in our trailers. That's why I went with the vinyl slate.

Bamboo: That I think could be really, really cool. Could really get a total feng shui thing going. Light and airy. Lot's of ideas with that one.
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Old 05-23-2003, 09:43 PM   #21
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Minimum Orders

If you find what you want and can't seem to get by the minimum order thing, check with some of the builder's surplus stores. If you're patient, you might be surprised what you can come up with.
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Old 05-23-2003, 11:20 PM   #22
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I was planning to do wood floors in my house, I may just need to save a few scraps and class up my little trailer. Of course decent countertops would probably do a lot more for it than hot shot floors. Ahh the projects go on.
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Old 05-26-2003, 08:20 PM   #23
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That's a given Chalrie. you fix the floor then you got to do the counter tops because they don't match, then that shows up the old cabinet doors. on and on and on

so now that we have our foor picked out, how do we level that fiberglass floor? mine has so many dips and bumps. didn't show up with carpet, but it will with that lilinoomiumun- linolium - what you said.
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Old 05-27-2003, 12:06 AM   #24
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We presently have an almost white vinyl flooring in our 16ft Scamp. We sort-of like it and sort-of don't like it. It is light and cheerful, but tends to look a bit ugly unless it has just been scrubbed. So I have been considering something different.

I would love to have a solid hard-wood floor, but I am concerned about expansion due to dampness, i.e., spills or leaks or perhaps high humidity. Has anyone had an experience with wood floors in a trailer that developed a roof leak? How about Pergo?
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Old 05-27-2003, 10:54 AM   #25
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Price wins, for now...

Well, I decided to go with a remnant of carpeting since it is *free*. It is "cheap landlord beige" carpeting leftover from when my house was carpeted prior to my purchase of said house. I figure it will do the trick for a while and when I get sick of it (and it wears out, since I already know from the house that it will do so rapidly) I'll do something more pricey and charming. I'm just going to cut to fit and not even glue it down.
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Old 05-27-2003, 12:49 PM   #26
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If you want to do ceramic tile, it's not really a problem, but it isn't installed the same as in a home. First, skip the cement board backer. Don't use regular thinset tile adhesive, either. Use a multi-purpose flooring adhesive, such as Henry's 356, which stays somewhat flexible. Don't use standard grout - use a water-cleanup caulk. Work the caulk into the grout lines, and then sponge over it with a barely damp sponge to remove the excess and smooth the caulk. Oh - user smaller tiles, too - not over 6". This way the floor has plenty of opportunities to flex as needed
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Old 01-07-2006, 09:51 AM   #27
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I just came across this thread as I was searching for flooring, and I'm curious--has anyone had any issues with expansion/contraction/cracking/buckling of their hardwood floors? We are planning on using our trailer for both winter and summer use (and we live in SW Colorado, so there's a decent amount of temperature difference). I am also fascinated by the bamboo floors (look, price, use of renewable materials) and think I would love to use them, although the Home Depot salesperson told me I absolutely have to nail it down (of course he also thought I was crazy for wanting to install anything but carpet in our trailer--so I'm taking his opinion with a grain of salt! ). I would really like to float the floor in the trailer, since I think that would be better in terms of give/flexing. The bamboo does have the tongue and groove installation (so I wonder if I really HAVE to nail)--has anyone disregarded the advice to nail/glue down a wood floor?
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Old 01-07-2006, 10:00 AM   #28
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Myself, I used a 3/4 inch plywood (8 ply) over the existing 5/8" plywood for a super strong floor surface. I then used real bolts to bolt through the plywood and onto the frame. The bolts going through the floor of the Burro actually hold the body to the frame. The original screws used were half eaten away. Now I have a very sturdy connection and a new flat, strong (8 ply, 3/4") wood floor.

I use indoor/outdoor carpet over this. I do this because you can get remnants inexpensive and change it out once a year. That way I can really use the trailer without worrying about spilling on the floor, getting dirt/mud, or having the dog sleeping on the floor. For about $15 - $20 a year I can have a new piece of indoor/outdoor carpet.
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