glue or epoxy? - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-19-2019, 11:54 PM   #1
Member
 
Name: Mark
Trailer: Trails West Campster
California
Posts: 31
glue or epoxy?

I would like to add some 1x1 or 2x2 pieces or wood to the inside ceiling of my fiberglass campster the idea is to install some runway lighting like they used to install in the old conversion vans into the ceiling of my camper. they are very light weight and small. Any ideas will be welcomed.
__________________

AstroMark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2019, 05:44 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
CarlD's Avatar
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: LiL Hauley
Syracuse, NY
Posts: 254
You could use epoxy or an elastomeric adhesive such as 3M5200. It has to withstand the temperatures the roof will experience. I used 3m5200 for my ceiling fixtures. I also used screws to hold the wood in place while the adhesive cured, which can take 7 days. I was able to use screws because my Lil Hauley is doubled hulled. I glued wood strips to the ceiling and needed some time to correctly position them, 5 minute epoxy would have been set up before I was finished so I used the 3M5200. For small wood blocks I would use 5 minute epoxy and hold them in place with an appropriate length stick until bonded.
__________________

__________________
Every day is a Saturday
CarlD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2019, 11:47 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Name: Lee
Trailer: Casita
Texas
Posts: 362
Registry
GE Iron Grip silicone adhesive will work very well. Just use some masking tape to hold it for 30 to 60 minutes and it will be there tell the cows come home.
__________________
Lee
Captleemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2019, 04:34 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Name: Greg
Trailer: bigfoot
SK
Posts: 9
thanks

I also needed this information. Thanks for the great replys!
g4fishing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2019, 06:43 PM   #5
Member
 
Name: Pete
Trailer: U-Haul 1986 -- got it 7/2013
Virginia
Posts: 32
Registry
All good choices. You might also consider Gorilla Glue; although that has the disadvantage of foaming up as it cures, and leaving a knurdle of foam that has to be razored off. But it, like 5200, is elastomeric, has enough "give" to withstand vibration; and is temperature-tolerant.
Pete Hein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2019, 07:38 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Name: Marcy
Trailer: Scamp
California
Posts: 1
Velcro

I have a Scamp trailer and it has rat fur on the interior. I strung small lights along ceiling seams with 1" strips of the hook size of Velcro. Maybe this will work for you.
Marcy on the Move is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2019, 08:08 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
widgetwizard's Avatar
 
Name: Jim
Trailer: Bigfoot
Texas
Posts: 445
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captleemo View Post
GE Iron Grip silicone adhesive will work very well. Just use some masking tape to hold it for 30 to 60 minutes and it will be there tell the cows come home.
Around here the cows come home every evening....
__________________
Retired from Orbital Machine Works.
Where is Jim now?
widgetwizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2019, 12:55 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1971 Trailswest Campster
Washington
Posts: 2,409
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstroMark View Post
I would like to add some 1x1 or 2x2 pieces or wood to the inside ceiling of my fiberglass campster the idea is to install some runway lighting like they used to install in the old conversion vans into the ceiling of my camper. they are very light weight and small. Any ideas will be welcomed.
I have no idea what the old "runway" lighting looks like. But I do know how to get wood to stick to fiberglass. But it is not clear if you want to stick them to the original indoor outdoor carpet or to the fiberglass.

The carpet is stuck to the ceiling with regular yellow contact cement, same formula is still being sold that they used back when the Campster was new. That means you can glue some thin wood blocks to surface of the carpet with the same contact cement. You can get that glue in small bottles and cans at any hardware store. Just follow the directions on the product. Let it cure for a day before putting the lights on.
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2019, 02:18 PM   #9
Member
 
Name: aj
Trailer: Roamer TC
Georgia
Posts: 81
Will the fiberglass epoxy be strong?
I plan to make a wooden beam to support the ceiling, glue it to the ceiling (double walled roof/ceiling) and let that maintain the curved shape since it is sunken roof now. Then it needs to hold the roof AC unit.
Is the epoxy strong enough to stick to the gel coated interior fiberglass and hold all these forces?
Roamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2019, 02:57 PM   #10
Member
 
Name: Pete
Trailer: U-Haul 1986 -- got it 7/2013
Virginia
Posts: 32
Registry
If the gelcoated surface is properly prepared - lightly sanded, then wiped down with acetone or similar solvent - the epoxy should stick to it well enough that any failure will be within the laminate, not in the bond line.
Pete Hein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2019, 05:20 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: boler 1978
British Columbia
Posts: 2
My preference would be silicone. Strong and flexible so the frame movement wont break the bond or damage the fiberglass. It has the added bonus or being easily removable if you can still slide and exacto blade under it.
kip22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2019, 10:26 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Raspy's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: Black Series HQ19, Oliver LE2
Smith Valley, Nevada
Posts: 1,552
The problem with silicone is that it can't be painted, unless you get the special, hard to find, paintable style. Conventional silicone does not accept paint.

Second, once you've used silicone, nothing else will ever stick there unless you use silicone again. The only way to fix that is to grind down into the fiberglass to remove any residue, before trying to use something else.

3M 5200 is designed to adhere to fiberglass, is flexible enough and is paintable. The bond is generally stronger than the fiberglass. Epoxy is the same deal. Very strong bond, paintable and flexible enough.

If you're going to add a wooden "beam" to the overhead, a very good way to add a lot of strength is to add fiberglass cloth over (actually under) the wood and out onto the surrounding fiberglass roof several inches on each side. Add a nice smooth radius on the outer edges of the beam (which might just be a 2X2, or 1X2 piece of wood) and lay the glass with a small brush and epoxy or polyester resin. About three layers would be nice. Each reaching out a bit less on each side to make a nice tapered layer. Then lightly sand and paint. The beam can be mounted with either 5200 or epoxy in preparation for the overlay of glass cloth. Sticks to the floor will hold everything in place until the glue is set. Then glass it. Use a 1/2" radius router bit to round the edges. This allows the glass to lay smooth over the curved edges and make a kinder place to bump your head than a square corner. With that, you could easily stand on the roof without it collapsing.

Epoxy sticks to polyester fiberglass very well. But polyester doesn't adhere to epoxy well at all. The trailers are made of polyester. So once you start with epoxy, stay with it in future repairs. You can get different formulas of epoxy that set up at different rates. A medium is good for this kind of work in warm weather. Just don't make a large batch and put it in a single cup, or it will get hot and harden too soon. Use a paper plate and get some 1" china bristle brushes at Harbor Freight that you just throw away as you go.
__________________
I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt.
Raspy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2019, 12:28 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1971 Trailswest Campster
Washington
Posts: 2,409
I use milled fibers to thicken epoxy when I want to adhere wood blocking to the ceilings surface of the fiberglass. The thickened epoxy fills up any voids and because it is thick you won't a big issue with the thinner epoxy dripping down and not properly adhering between the wood and the ceiling.



You will need to use some spring poles to put tension on the piece of wood until the epoxy is set. For a rapid set put the epoxy resin and hardener containers into a very hot tap water bath right before you mix it. That will kick the thermal reaction off in next to no time. But do leave the spring poles in place at least over night before doing any weight bearing additions onto them.



I will be doing this method in the very near future for putting in some wood backer plates on the interior of the roof at the locations where I am bolting the solar panel brackets in place. On the interior side those wood plates will have light fixtures attached to them thereby hiding their primary function but attached to allow the lights to be removed for access to the nuts on the bolt ends.
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2019, 06:23 AM   #14
Member
 
Name: Pete
Trailer: U-Haul 1986 -- got it 7/2013
Virginia
Posts: 32
Registry
The last two posters got it. I'd add two things:

Gorilla Glue (and I suppose any other moisture-curing polyurethane) is very strong and also slightly flexible. It does require a trace of water to cure fully, so you might have to wipe down one of the surfaces with a lightly-dampened towel. NOT wet, that will interfere with the bond.

When working with epoxy, it's good to keep the mix in a shallow container, and if it's warm out, to put that container in another one holding cold water. That will absorb enough of the exotherm to keep the stuff workable significantly longer. And it's also a good idea to keep a bucket with some vinegar in it, because vinegar will kill the epoxy hardener, making it possible to remove the stuff from your hands/tools/whatever. I've used plain white table vinegar but I suppose "cleaning" vinegar (stronger) would work better.

Cheers... PeteH
__________________

Pete Hein is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What glue is the best to glue the fabric on the sealing. Falicea Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 11 10-31-2017 09:22 PM
Epoxy, Gel Coat, Bondo, fiberglass repair KevinScamps Modifications, Alterations and Updates 17 09-27-2016 07:07 PM
Building a bunk.. Epoxy or PL ????? babs08 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 7 03-15-2015 07:34 PM
Which epoxy/resin to seal belly band on Trillium? Gumpit Modifications, Alterations and Updates 4 11-10-2010 02:38 PM
an epoxy on both your houses Ian-Vicki Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 12 06-14-2008 09:20 AM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.