Has anyone tried spray on bedliner inside? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-07-2010, 09:34 AM   #1
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Has anyone tried spray on bedliner inside?

I was looking at the neighbors truck yesterday. He had the spray on bedliner put in. It looks to be between 1/8" and 3/16" thick. It also looks like it is an extremely even coat and has a finish much like the ensolite inside the campers. I was wondering if anyone thought about gutting their shell and maybe using this stuff inside. It would ensure it was completely sealed and since you can get it colored any color you want it would already be finished. Since it is some sort of rubber coating it would also have some flex and not ever crack. Seems like it would last forever. I have seen it applied to the floors in Jeep wranglers in different colors as well. Randy
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:05 AM   #2
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I'd be concerned about out gassing in a living/breathing fairly sealed environment. It's not designed for indoor applications. I suppose you could check with the manufacturer....

hummm curious to follow this thread
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:11 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
I'd be concerned about out gassing in a living/breathing fairly sealed environment. It's not designed for indoor applications. I suppose you could check with the manufacturer....

hummm curious to follow this thread
I think I read that it was o.k. and that is why they can apply it in the Jeeps the way they do. Also in the Jeeps it gets heated by the floor heat and the heat rising from the exhaust without any problems. I think it is basically recycled rubber. I will check on it further but I think it would work great. I had no intention of doing a complete gutting of the interior but if this would work it would solve every concern I could think of with leaks. Heck if I wanted it to last forever I may even do the outside as well... They do have many colors including WHITE.
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:13 AM   #4
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As I recall, at least one other on this forum has gone down this path. I believe he did his walls, floor, and cabinets with the stuff. Do a search and see what pops up.

I'm curious if that stuff adds a lot of weight...
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:18 AM   #5
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Spraybedliner Seems to be safe anyway. I tried searching but maybe had the wrong keywords. Do you have a link so we can get the members input. Thanks Randy
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:20 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Gumpit View Post
It would ensure it was completely sealed
I'm not sure what you mean about ensuring that the trailer was completely sealed inside (?). The fiberglass itself is already a "sealed" shell, except where you (or the factory) put holes in it for windows, vents, and etc.

If there were any unwanted through-holes (say, in the case of the Trillium, for those pesky belly-band rivets), I would say they should be repaired with fiberglass and resin, not by "sealing" the inside with something like bedliner.

I may not be clearly understanding what you mean though.
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:21 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Gumpit View Post
I was looking at the neighbors truck yesterday. He had the spray on bedliner put in. It looks to be between 1/8" and 3/16" thick. It also looks like it is an extremely even coat and has a finish much like the ensolite inside the campers. I was wondering if anyone thought about gutting their shell and maybe using this stuff inside. It would ensure it was completely sealed and since you can get it colored any color you want it would already be finished. Since it is some sort of rubber coating it would also have some flex and not ever crack. Seems like it would last forever. I have seen it applied to the floors in Jeep wranglers in different colors as well. Randy
While all bedliner sprays dry like paint and offer no odor or outgassing problems after drying, there are several brands and qualities available.
some brands go on thicker and more flexible while others go on thinner and dry harder. I think Rhinoliner may be best suited for thickness and flexibility. Herculiner and Duplicolor are available in DIY versions for roll on and spray on applications. Duplicolor is offered in spray cans too, but I have only seen black around here.
There is a local company here in Illinois which offers a "rubberized" bedliner type spray for garage floors which may work for this application as well.
While this solution may look nice, block light and maybe offer a little sound abatement, I doubt it would insulate very well.
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:33 AM   #8
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I found the post about the Rhinoliner but it was from 7 years ago and I am sure the technology has come a long way. I was talking about ensuring it being sealed from the standpoint of not only rivet holes but also the future road chips that occur as well as the factory flaws as well in the application of the fiberglass over the seems. I know there are purist in the group. But I am in it for the fact it is lightweight. I have a 4 cylinder Tacoma that I will probably have for the next 20 years to pull it with. I don't think the spray on liner will add that much more weight to it. I also figured while winter is coming and I have until spring to work on it I can do what needs to be done now. I already have to address the belly band issue with the rivets, so I was looking at options to seal it and have peace of mind for any other leaks that would occur other than the windows and vent. Already ordered the butyl tape for that. I am new to the fiberglass camping world and learning a lot. Like butyl tape instead of caulking... Just asking about the liner as an option.Seems like a good idea but I bet the people who used caulk thought so too... lol... Just looking for options thanks... I also made a donation to this site for the information.It is great and I hope everyone makes a donation for the information they have received.Thanks again Randy
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Old 11-07-2010, 10:49 AM   #9
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The only spray on stuff I know that was designed for the inside of a living space is LizardSkin. Oliver used it between the hulls. Someone on Bolerama used it and is very happy with the results at the tune of over $1,000. I have two hot rod friends that used it inside old panel trucks....

I really hope whatever you use works, I'm sure a number of folks would be interested in the results. I'd still check with a manufacturer and not assume anything... these are your lungs you're talking about and breathing in and out for 8 hours a night....
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:04 AM   #10
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Hmmm.... This LizardSkin sounds very interesting... Evidently can also be used on the exterior roof surface to further reduce heat transfer. The website doesn't expressly describe color options tho. Ordering requires a phone call.
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Old 11-07-2010, 12:32 PM   #11
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Gumpit,

I don't want to sound like a know-it-all, but from what I understand about fiberglass, and the construction of our campers, I don't really see some of what you are saying. Now, if you just want the interior coating, then that is a perfectly valid reason to do it. I just want to respond to reasons that don't make sense to me as a reader. I don't mean to sound too "frank," and I want you to feel welcome in the forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumpit View Post
I was talking about ensuring it being sealed from the standpoint of not only rivet holes

If you are talking about your Trillium, I don't think they actually have rivet holes in the same way that other campers do. Yes, the belly band is riveted on (not totally through, unless they have broken though from rust in the backing plates), but you say (rightfully) that you are going to repair that separately)
.

but also the future road chips that occur

How would coating on the inside of the camper protect against road chips (?)

as well as the factory flaws as well in the application of the fiberglass over the seems.

I think if you have flaws on the the inside of the seam (I have to assume this would be the seam where the upper and lower shells are joined unless there is another seam I don't know about) that you should repair them some other way. If they are cosmetic, and if you are removing the Ensolite (I wouldn't do that, myself) they should be faired (but would not need to be faired if you keep the Ensolite). If you have actual breaks, cracks or holes, in the seam, then they should be repaired with fiberglass cloth and resin from the inside. It's not necessary to be a highly skilled artisan, since this would be under the Ensolite on the inside.

I already have to address the belly band issue with the rivets, so I was looking at options to seal it and have peace of mind for any other leaks that would occur other than the windows and vent.

I don't believe that any internal bedliner type coating, no matter how wonderful, would seal either the belly band or any other leaks. Or am I misunderstanding something?

Like butyl tape instead of caulking... Just asking about the liner as an option.Seems like a good idea but I bet the people who used caulk thought so too... lol... Just looking for options thanks...

I don't see how bedliner and caulk could ever substitute for one another. Edited to add: Oh wait, I think I see that you are saying that people who used caulk were confident but were actually making a mistake, and you are comparing that to your "thinking outside the box" with bedliner for an inside wall treatment. Okay, fair enough, although just to be accurate, there is nothing wrong with using caulk to seal vents and windows. In fact, butyl comes in caulk form, and it's a great product. Polyurethan caulk is also another great choice, albeit not quite as easy to use as the butyl tape.

What you want to avoid is inferior caulking types (but not the form factor of caulk itself), and the practice of caulking over the outside of something to (supposedly) fix a leak, when what you really need to do is put the sealant under the flange.
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Old 11-07-2010, 01:00 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Gumpit View Post
I found the post about the Rhinoliner but it was from 7 years ago and I am sure the technology has come a long way. I was talking about ensuring it being sealed from the standpoint of not only rivet holes but also the future road chips that occur as well as the factory flaws as well in the application of the fiberglass over the seems. I know there are purist in the group. But I am in it for the fact it is lightweight. I have a 4 cylinder Tacoma that I will probably have for the next 20 years to pull it with. I don't think the spray on liner will add that much more weight to it. I also figured while winter is coming and I have until spring to work on it I can do what needs to be done now. I already have to address the belly band issue with the rivets, so I was looking at options to seal it and have peace of mind for any other leaks that would occur other than the windows and vent. Already ordered the butyl tape for that. I am new to the fiberglass camping world and learning a lot. Like butyl tape instead of caulking... Just asking about the liner as an option.Seems like a good idea but I bet the people who used caulk thought so too... lol... Just looking for options thanks... I also made a donation to this site for the information.It is great and I hope everyone makes a donation for the information they have received.Thanks again Randy
There's been a late 4o's Plymouth coupe running around here for about a decade with a bright orange Rhino liner "paint job". It has held up great and looks like it should say "SunKist" on the doors!
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Old 11-07-2010, 01:41 PM   #13
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One note is that the original poster is asking about using it on the inside of the camper. Not that durability would not be important of course.

Raya
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Old 11-07-2010, 01:47 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Raya L. View Post
One note is that the original poster is asking about using it on the inside of the camper. Not that durability would not be important of course.

Raya
That's how I read it too, but how do you get "road chips" on the inside of the camper? An outside "road chip" in the fiberglass would have to be pretty serious to cause a leak! That's the source of my confusion.
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