How do you attach cabinets to walls of Compact - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-05-2013, 04:24 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: ruth
Trailer: currently shopping
Mississippi
Posts: 16
How do you attach cabinets to walls of Compact

Hi again all,

I have been viewing photo's and reading threads about total rip outs. My question is...how do new cabinets in trailers such as Compacts and Trilliums attach to the walls. I see that everyone starts with "framing". Do you use glue and if so what kind? Do you use lag bolts from outside in. (That makes no sense to put holes in fiberglass, but what do I know?)

I have tried to read thru all of the different threads going back to 2006 and have not found the information I need.

Thank you,
Ruth
__________________

__________________
R_ROTTON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 05:04 PM   #2
Commercial Member
 
Ian G.'s Avatar
 
Name: Ian
Trailer: 1974 Boler 1300 - 2014 Escape 19'
Alberta
Posts: 1,267
Registry
On my modifications I connected the base of the cabinets securely to the floor using mostly machine bolts and angle brackets. To secure the cabinets to the walls I either used epoxy to fasten anchor blocks or brackets to the wall the fasten the cabinet to these or in some cases used fiberglass to attach the cabinets directly to the wall. In this process I have eliminated every rivet going through the exterior walls of the Boler.

Do remember that in most FGRVs some of the cabinets are structural, they either have to be replaced or another method used to support the walls and roof.
__________________

Ian G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 05:31 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Name: ruth
Trailer: currently shopping
Mississippi
Posts: 16
Great reply, easy to understand. Thank you so much!!! We can sleep on this and plan.

Ruth and Chuck
__________________
R_ROTTON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 09:25 PM   #4
Moderator
 
Frederick L. Simson's Avatar
 
Name: Frederick
Trailer: Fiber Stream
California
Posts: 8,142
Registry
Send a message via AIM to Frederick L. Simson
I am in the middle of a "do-over" gut and restore on my Compact Jr. In agreement with Ian, the base cabinets are mainly secured to the floor. I also make use of the entry door frame to attach cabinetry on each side to. The bunk tops have a wood brace fiberglassed into the sides. I use the window frames to attach shelving around the front perimeter along the top of the windows.
__________________
Frederick - The Scaleman
1978 Fiber Stream 16 named "Eggstasy" & 1971 Compact Jr. named "Boomerang"
Frederick L. Simson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 06:08 AM   #5
Commercial Member
 
Ian G.'s Avatar
 
Name: Ian
Trailer: 1974 Boler 1300 - 2014 Escape 19'
Alberta
Posts: 1,267
Registry
One tip I should add, when attaching wood blocks to the fiberglass use epoxy based resins like the West System. These bond to the wood far better than the polyester resins used in normal fiberglass work and offer far greater strength.
Ian G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 09:59 AM   #6
Moderator
 
Frederick L. Simson's Avatar
 
Name: Frederick
Trailer: Fiber Stream
California
Posts: 8,142
Registry
Send a message via AIM to Frederick L. Simson
Quote:
Originally Posted by R_ROTTON View Post
Do you use lag bolts from outside in. (That makes no sense to put holes in fiberglass, but what do I know?)
Actually, my Compact Jr. did use one screw on each side from the outside in to secure the original dividing wall between the kitchen compartment and the dinette/sleeping compartment to the stationary part of the roof. These 2 holes are located close to the lip for attaching the canvass.

The mechanism to raise and lower the roof is also bolted to through the hull holes which need to be sealed well.
__________________
Frederick - The Scaleman
1978 Fiber Stream 16 named "Eggstasy" & 1971 Compact Jr. named "Boomerang"
Frederick L. Simson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 03:02 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Name: ruth
Trailer: currently shopping
Mississippi
Posts: 16
Great info all!!! I will be sharing this all with my husband when he gets home tonight. I am feeling much more confident now.
__________________
R_ROTTON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 05:46 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 4,753
I was once told by an epoxy mfr that epoxies can be made with polyamines, polyamides, or polyesters. To be more specific about the West System, I believe their epoxies are mostly polyamines. Polyamines are faster curing and less smelly to use than polyesters, among other differences.
__________________
To everything... there is a season...
and a time to every purpose under heaven...
--The Byrds
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 07:23 PM   #9
AJB
Member
 
AJB's Avatar
 
Name: Adam
Trailer: Scamp
Florida
Posts: 36
If your trailer is a scamp with carpet walls like mine is, then I'm not sure how you'd epoxy to the inside of the wall without removing the carpet first. This would seem unsightly in my opinion from the inside. Unless you were able to cut it just perfectly My cabinets are attached to the trailer with rivets and screws from the outside in. Yes you see the rivets and screws from the outside but it doesn't bother me. Anything that I want to attach, like a wood block for supporting a tv bracket, I use #10 ss screws with a galvanized washer and rubber grommet. This seals up nicely and makes the connection very strong. The ss screws are a bit more expensive however you wont have to worry abt unsightly rust stains down the road.
__________________
AJB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2013, 02:41 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
peterh's Avatar
 
Name: Peter
Trailer: 2005 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Oregon
Posts: 1,519
Registry
I've read a couple stories by people who have used epoxy to attach stringers/mounting blocks for their cabinets, only to have then fall off when they hit a large bump. I think this is likely due to a couple of things you should probably think about.

First, stringers/mounting blocks are usually straight, flat, and smooth, where our trailer walls are curved, irregular, and rough, making it difficult to form a full-contact connection betrween board, epoxy, and trailer wall. The result is the typical epoxy only really connects board to wall in a handfull of places where the two actually touch. If you're going to use an adhesive to connect stringers to your walls, get an epoxy that creates a thick paste and apply enough that is gushes out from the edges of the board when you put it up. An alternative to more expensive epoxy might be Bondo Glass; just be sure to clearly mark the locations and pre-fit your boards before mixing up enough Bondo Glass to liberally cover the entire mounting surface of the board in one mixing, and then work very, very, very fast. Bondo Glass sets up in five to ten minutes from the time you mix it. Remember the board has to be held securely in-place for about 20 full minutes to give the Bondo Glass time to both set and cure before you release it.

Another thing that can lead to failure is not cleaning the mounting surface thoroughly. Little bits of wall covering and adhesive will interfere with the adhesive bond, so wire brush the area to which the board will be attached clean and wipe it down with either MEK (wear gloves and be careful, MEK is a powerful, toxic solvent that can dissolve your wall coverings) or acetone (safer, less effective).

You are better off attaching a rough-sawed board or rough-sawed side of a board to your trailer wall than a sanded or planed-smooth board. The adhesives we've mentioned here don't absorb into wood very well, like wood glues do, and the rough texture gives the adhesive more "tooth" to grab on to.

For applications requiring strength, trailer manufacturers "tab," or attach strips of fiberglass mat that wrap the stringer/mounting block on three sides and then attach to the wall. Tabbed-in stringers/mounting blocks are the gold standard for strength and durability.

One last bit of advice: clamping. Whatever adhesive you use, it won't do you any good unless it's held firmly in-place until the adhesive has not only set, but has actually cured. When installing ribs into our Surfside, we used both Bondo Glass and tabbing to secure them, and held them in-place while the Bondo Glass set using screws with fender washers inserted and tightened through pre-drilled holes in the shell that ran every 8-10" down the center line of the boards. After the Bondo had set and the tabbing went in, we removed the screws and used Bondo body filler to fill in the screw holes.

The attached picture, courtesy of Mike Morrison who posted a picture Escape Trailers sent him of his trailer being built in the Tabbing fiberglass cabinetry?? thread, shows a trailer that employs both techniques. You can see where the adhesive has gushed out from under the stringers and been flattened out with a putty knife, and other stringers that are held in-place by fiberglass tabbing.

__________________
peterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2013, 05:53 AM   #11
Commercial Member
 
Ian G.'s Avatar
 
Name: Ian
Trailer: 1974 Boler 1300 - 2014 Escape 19'
Alberta
Posts: 1,267
Registry
Good post Peter, another important item is the type of Epoxy used, you will notice that I specifically identified West Systems. Epoxies like any product need to be the correct formula used for the items being attached and used in the correct manner. Preparation is key (no you cannot epoxy to carpet and expect it to hold), always work from the raw fiberglass and make sure it is clean, any mold release, oils, silicon's, etc on the surface will not allow full adhesion (probably the reason behind the stories of epoxy not holding. Research the product, I would hesitate using a 5 minute fast cure as it probably does not allow enough time to position the fixtures before it begins to skin and set.
Ian G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2016, 12:23 PM   #12
Junior Member
 
CrazyTimmy's Avatar
 
Name: Jeff
Trailer: Boler
MB
Posts: 3
Sorry to resurrect such an old thread but I have a few questions for this topic and it was the first result in my search. (If there is a newer thread you think i should be posting to let me know)

I have a few leaky rivets we found out this past weekend and it got me thinking about how I want to go about our renovations since I'll be resealing the windows and likely painting and fixing up the fiberglass.

My question, you mention using epoxy to attach wood supports for the cabinets, I was wondering about glassing them in rather then epoxy. On our boiler there are already a few supports like this and it seem like it might be the better option to me. My goal is to remove all rivets from the exterior. Thoughts on this?

A concern of mine would be condensation as I would keep the ensolat insulation and just cut out where my wood supports would be glassed in to keep the cabinets at the same location depth wise as they are now. Of course that means no insulation on those parts for when there is a temperature difference that might cause condensation buildup. Anyone have experience doing something like this or similar?

Thanks for your time,

Jeff
__________________
CrazyTimmy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 10:04 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Name: Todd
Trailer: in the market
Kentucky
Posts: 5
what about a Burro?

So I'm considering buying a Burro 13' and of course it has very little storage, but no carpet on the wall. Would I still "rough up" the painted fiberglass on the inside in order to fiberglass in some stringers or blocks?
__________________
gallahadion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2016, 04:48 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Name: john
Trailer: Compact Junior
Michigan
Posts: 190
Have you got a photo Frederick?

I would like to see a photo of shelving attached to the Company's window frame.

Thanks!
__________________

__________________
john madill is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Compact jr- cabinets Sherry A Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 07-06-2013 06:26 PM
Success with Int paint walls,countertops,Cabinets, Carpet for floors. Walls, too? Gigi Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 2 08-31-2012 11:13 AM
Painting Cabinets in a Compact Jr. Ricky 4 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 15 01-27-2010 10:20 PM
Why not Rhino liner on the inside walls/cabinets? Gigi Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 14 04-25-2006 09:52 AM
How did you attach your sway bar? Chris Z Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 9 04-11-2006 06:59 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.