HUB Bearing/Repack DIY - 1976 Trillium 1300 - - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-15-2013, 08:22 PM   #1
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Name: Walter
Trailer: 1976 Trillium 1300; Invertec Falcon 190 class b rv
Washington
Posts: 75
HUB Bearing/Repack DIY - 1976 Trillium 1300 -

Just finished this little project on a Trilly that was purchased 6 mos ago, and to be honest, being a newbie, it was more work than I anticipated even after watching online videos, but it worked out well in the end. I am glad I did the job as the trailer really needed this complete service . It had not had the hubs repacked by a shop in 5 yrs, though one hub looked like it had recently been regreased which, as it turned out, was not enough.

The difficult parts of the job were:

(1) getting the correct rear bearings/races at Napa ( initially given the wrong ones even though I brought in the hub as there were 2 choices). The correct rear bearing/race was part no. BR13, front BR4, both made in Japan; the rear seal and front bearing were simple to get as there was only one choice ;
(2) getting the rear seal out was difficult, even going at it from the rear, in an attempt to avoid damaging the rear bearing ( damaged one of two ) . If I had tried to knock it out from the front, it would definitely have damaged the rear bearing.
(3) the rear bearing races were hard to get out and even harder to get in. It was a lot of pounding with a big hammer, using an 9" punch to get them out and straight pvc connectors sizes, 1" and 2" , to drive in the races, as they were the same diameter as these pieces.
(4) it was a mistake on my part to think I could get away with just removing the rear seal, replace it and clean/repack the existent bearings. As it turned out, both rear bearings showed signs of wear, and needed to be replaced which meant also replacing the races.
(5)It seems the going rate for repacking the hubs of a 2 wheel trailer is $150 labor. I don't know if this includes putting in new bearings/races.
(6) The price for parts is: rear seal FI 171255TB x2 $7.18, rear bearing/race X2 $26.88, front bearing/race X2 $24.88, for total of $58.94. Replacement cotter pins were cheap at $0.10 a piece. I had forgotten them on my first trip to Napa.

For someone not so adventurous who knew a good mechanic, could have the job done at their home or close-by with easy parking, would do the entire job ( 2 wheels, replace bearings/races and repack ) for $150 labor plus parts, I don't think you could go wrong.

Personally, I like challenges and learning new ways I can care for my Trilly, and didn't know a good mechanic or have a place close by to go to if I wanted to have someone else do the job. I was skeptical that just anybody would do a good job as I had recently seen a mobile repair person pack a rear bearing on a Class A when the rear seal went bad and didn't do it according to the book.

Hopefully, this info will help someone redo their hubs on a vintage Trillium and same themselves a 2nd trip to Napa for the right rear bearings.
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Old 10-15-2013, 08:31 PM   #2
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Name: Chuck
Trailer: tp
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repack bearings

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Originally Posted by georgewa View Post
Just finished this little project on a Trilly that was purchased 6 mos ago, and to be honest, being a newbie, it was more work than I anticipated even after watching online videos, but it worked out well in the end. I am glad I did the job as the trailer really needed this complete service . It had not had the hubs repacked by a shop in 5 yrs, though one hub looked like it had recently been regreased which, as it turned out, was not enough.

The difficult parts of the job were:

(1) getting the correct rear bearings/races at Napa ( initially given the wrong ones even though I brought in the hub as there were 2 choices). The correct rear bearing/race was part no. BR13, front BR4, both made in Japan; the rear seal and front bearing were simple to get as there was only one choice ;
(2) getting the rear seal out was difficult, even going at it from the rear, in an attempt to avoid damaging the rear bearing ( damaged one of two ) . If I had tried to knock it out from the front, it would definitely have damaged the rear bearing.
(3) the rear bearing races were hard to get out and even harder to get in. It was a lot of pounding with a big hammer, using an 9" punch to get them out and straight pvc connectors sizes, 1" and 2" , to drive in the races, as they were the same diameter as these pieces.
(4) it was a mistake on my part to think I could get away with just removing the rear seal, replace it and clean/repack the existent bearings. As it turned out, both rear bearings showed signs of wear, and needed to be replaced which meant also replacing the races.
(5)It seems the going rate for repacking the hubs of a 2 wheel trailer is $150 labor. I don't know if this includes putting in new bearings/races.
(6) The price for parts is: rear seal FI 171255TB x2 $7.18, rear bearing/race X2 $26.88, front bearing/race X2 $24.88, for total of $58.94. Replacement cotter pins were cheap at $0.10 a piece. I had forgotten them on my first trip to Napa.

For someone not so adventurous who knew a good mechanic, could have the job done at their home or close-by with easy parking, would do the entire job ( 2 wheels, replace bearings/races and repack ) for $150 labor plus parts, I don't think you could go wrong.

Personally, I like challenges and learning new ways I can care for my Trilly, and didn't know a good mechanic or have a place close by to go to if I wanted to have someone else do the job. I was skeptical that just anybody would do a good job as I had recently seen a mobile repair person pack a rear bearing on a Class A when the rear seal went bad and didn't do it according to the book.

Hopefully, this info will help someone redo their hubs on a vintage Trillium and same themselves a 2nd trip to Napa for the right rear bearings.
You did the right thing repacking your trailer bearings yourself. At least you know the job was done right. I have seen to many people take their trailer to a shop. Some shops do good work and some don't.
I recently repacked the bearings on my 93 Casita. The grease was very old and smelled bad. Ater I cleaned up all the parts they were in good shape. I repaced the bearings and replaced the seals.
Chuck
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Old 10-15-2013, 08:39 PM   #3
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Name: bob
Trailer: 1984 u-haul ct13; 1996 Casita 17 Spirit Deluxe; 1946 Modernistic teardrop
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A class A would most likely have bearings lubricated by the rear end gear oil, therefore not packed with grease. Procedure is to oil the inner bearing and put it in the hub, install the seal with the correct driver tool, install hub, fill hub with oil, install outer bearing and nuts, install axle. Then check for proper oil level in the rear. I would usually then jack up the opposite side to get more oil to the hub or park the vehicle on a tilted surface. Some mechanics will put a small amount of grease on the bearings to ensure lubrication until gear oil reaches and fills the hub. When one of those seals fails it can result in a real mess. After 30 years as a truck mechanic, I have no desire to own a motor home. And where did you read procedure on packing that type of setup.
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:56 PM   #4
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Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
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Originally Posted by mary and bob View Post
A class A would most likely have bearings lubricated by the rear end gear oil, therefore not packed with grease. Procedure is to oil the inner bearing and put it in the hub, install the seal with the correct driver tool, install hub, fill hub with oil, install outer bearing and nuts, install axle. Then check for proper oil level in the rear. I would usually then jack up the opposite side to get more oil to the hub or park the vehicle on a tilted surface. Some mechanics will put a small amount of grease on the bearings to ensure lubrication until gear oil reaches and fills the hub. When one of those seals fails it can result in a real mess. After 30 years as a truck mechanic, I have no desire to own a motor home. And where did you read procedure on packing that type of setup.
--------------------------------------

Some full floating rear axles use grease packed bearings and are a PITA to pull and repack. Others depend on differential oil as mentioned.
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Old 10-15-2013, 10:07 PM   #5
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Packing Tips

[QUOTE=georgewa;425169]Just finished this little project on a Trilly that was purchased 6 mos ago, and to be honest, being a newbie, it was more work than I anticipated even after watching online videos, but it worked out well in the end. I am glad I did the job as the trailer really needed this complete service . It had not had the hubs repacked by a shop in 5 yrs, though one hub looked like it had recently been regreased which, as it turned out, was not enough.
==================================================

1. I pulled both drums off and handed them to the peeps at a trailer service company along with the parts I had purchased. 1 Hour and $50 they handed them back to me with races changed and fresh grease on everything. NO HAMMERING They only use a hydraulic press.

2. If you have to do it yourself: After everything is all apart and cleaned up, put the drums/hubs in a 200 degree oven and the bearing races in the freezer.

Down one cold one and after about 30 minutes, take out one drum and two races and, using a block of wood, quickly & gently tap them into place. Repeat with 2nd drum/hub. grease up new bearings and you are done.

The harder you have to hit a bearing race the shorter it's life will be....
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Old 10-15-2013, 10:34 PM   #6
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Name: Walter
Trailer: 1976 Trillium 1300; Invertec Falcon 190 class b rv
Washington
Posts: 75
Mary and Bob reply - the Class A did have fluid from the differential running into the hubs and was the reason why the technician only had to lightly grease the rear bearing. My criticism was probably unfounded if the greasing had to be only temporary.

Bob - I'll remember the chilling trick on the races for next time. Thank you!
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Old 10-18-2013, 12:44 PM   #7
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Trailer: Lil Snoozy
Michigan
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An installation tip: grind down the OD of the old cup (outer race press fit into wheel hub). Precision isn't important - it just has to fit freely in the hub. Use your new tool to tap the new cup into the hub.
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