Karin's Campster Renovation - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-08-2016, 12:18 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by theresa p View Post
Karin----I have neither the need or desire to completely reno my trailer.....but I am really enjoying reading all about yours.

Thanks for documenting your step-by-step. It's not only greatly educational, but entertaining, too.

I look forward to seeing the finished product.
Thanks, I seem to have to amuse myself with renovating houses and now little fiberglass RVs. I should know better but always seem to go for the sweat equity since I have the skills and that is what I can best afford to do. I don't actually find it to be a lot of fun getting covered with various kinds of dirt, paint and adhesives but I do enjoy learning about methods and materials, problem solving and the planning stages of it.

Maybe it is just part of the cycle of the very young girl I once was who always dreamed of building her own home and liked making and fixing things and using tools. To thine own self be true, I have always been and still am who I was even at a very young age even before I was old enough to go school.

My best friend that I share workshop space with has a welder. He is going to do a patch up reinforcement on that weak area of the frame for me. But of course I will use that as an hands on lesson opportunity with his machine as I might have a need to weld more things in the future on this project. I once took a short course from an artist on basic welding but that was torch work. I just wanted to try it out of curiosity. I did have a good touch for it since I am a tool user.
__________________

__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2016, 12:45 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
finding a forgotten treasure

Yesterday I was prowling around in my friends garage looking for some tools and other stuff I knew I had. He lets me have some storage space in his garage. That garage it is an unholy mess but that is because it is a lifetime's worth of project stuff from a very creative person. While looking for stuff I discovered a 6 piece bundle of 8 foot long aluminum angles. When I walked to the other end and looked at the shipping label on the bundle I discovered it was my very own aluminum angle I had ordered it several years ago for my Sunrader project and then in the exhaustion and sometimes mental confusion created by a bad health episode (now resolved) I had forgotten that I had it on hand. Hooray for me now I have pretty much all the materials I need for building the cabinet framing for the Campster. No more stress worrying about trying to fit the purchase of it into an already too tight budget. I am glad I had put off ordering the angle, I had planned to do it last week but my progress was slow due to the heat wave so I delayed placing the order since I was not ready to start framing. There were also two 8' long pieces of square aluminum tubing, I knew those were lurking somewhere and was glad to see them turn up
__________________

__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2016, 05:25 PM   #31
Member
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Trails West Campster andTeardrop American
California
Posts: 73
Registry
Campster Windows

I got some pictures for you. 2 Surprises, one of my window pulls is also missing and I have screens on the windows. I will try to post more on the screens later.
Attached Thumbnails
Port window 1.jpg   Port window 2.jpg  

Starboard window 1.jpg   Starboard window 2.jpg  

__________________
rwilhelm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2016, 10:09 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
Looks like the only logical place to put a handle is at that leading edge of the inside pane that extends just past the center divider.

I will be interested to see more of the screen detail.

Thanks for taking the time to get photos. Eventually working together the collective owners who are members may well be able to gather all the facts and come up with a restoration plan and materials list for those windows.

I really need to take a drive up to Evergreen RV and pick the brains of the guy in the repair shop there who knows his after market exterior seal replacement supply catalogs. That is assuming he is still employed there.

I have a package waiting at my mail box service. I am hoping it is the felt gaskets I ordered but then again it might be my hitch anti rattle device.

If I can't find another way to make affordable window screens I am going to 3D print the curved corners in a profile to work with standard household window screen framing components. That will keep the cost under control versus ordering everything from the RV supply system. I can also print retaining clips to hold the screens in place if need be. I was wondering when I was going to take advantage of my friend's 3D printer that is here at the workshop for making RV parts.
__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2016, 10:55 PM   #33
Member
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Trails West Campster andTeardrop American
California
Posts: 73
Registry
Fascinating. Pretty handy having a 3D printer available. They are still relatively rare. I'm glad to help because I know I will need some help in the future. You've already helped with front window. I appreciate that. I'm taking a trip east to my nieces wedding in about a week or so. Was going to use the trailer, but that turned out to be a bit ...... ambitious, so I'm taking the train. Will be returning the 1st of July and then start looking at all the little things I want to fix. Don't know if I will have time to have the original refrigerator installed before I go. The place I'm taking the trailer is called Dr George, the RV Doctor. He has a salvage yard for rv's as well as a repair shop.

I'll get back to you on the screens, but I'm not sure when.

Roger
__________________
rwilhelm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2016, 11:30 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
Campster thru the frame bolts

I made a discovery pertaining to the bolts that tie the shell to the frame. They installed the those bolts while the epoxy slurry that secured the plywood floor in place was still uncured. Those bolts are basically impossible to remove without a ton of work as they are completely bonded in by the epoxy that is under the plywood. The nuts are rusted firmly on underneath and while I could use a nut splitter to remove those I would even then still be unable to take the bolts out. Without grinding them all the way down to the fiberglass shell they are there to stay. It makes no real sense to bother with removing the bolts at this point in time, I will save it for a future time when I replace the frame. So for now I will leave them in place since the bolts are functioning but I will also install some additional new bolts through the frame as a backup security measure.

I am also working on removing the old steel angles that bolt only through the fiberglass shell. Those were the tie down support for the old wood cabinets. Two are out and four more to go. The bolt heads also have to be ground off to remove those angles as those bolts were also epoxied in. So for now they too will have the bolt shaft with a nut in place underneath the trailer. It does not matter if I do that, they are doing no work except for plugging a hole in the floor. One of these days I will grind it flush to the fiberglass and put fiberglass cloth and resin over the hole. But that is not high on the priority list this summer.

I only need to replace 18 inches worth of the plywood floor area that starts at the door as that is the only rotted section in the floor. The rest of it just needs sanding to remove the dirt then I will coat the surface with some epoxy paint and seal all the edges too. Then I will put a fillet of caulk around all the cut edges and seal it to the fiberglass so that no water can get into the voids underneath. Nothing difficult about that part of the job except for too much bending and kneeling. It is times like that when I literally do lay down on the job
__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2016, 10:07 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Name: Talia
Trailer: Hunter Compact Jr.
USA
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by k corbin View Post
My best friend that I share workshop space with has a welder. He is going to do a patch up reinforcement on that weak area of the frame for me. But of course I will use that as an hands on lesson opportunity with his machine as I might have a need to weld more things in the future on this project. I once took a short course from an artist on basic welding but that was torch work. I just wanted to try it out of curiosity. I did have a good touch for it since I am a tool user.
Nice to know a good welder, isn't it? I can't pick up my newly-purchased 1972 Compact Jr for another week (it's three states away from me) but when I do, I want to get a friend of mine who is a professional welder to reinforce the frame, since I hear that it can be weak at the tongue/body point. Are you planning to just add steel reinforcement bars there, or are you going to add a central beam going under the front center, and out to the hitch? I'm not sure exactly what to tell my buddy to do when I get mine home.
__________________
Talia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2016, 06:13 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talia View Post
Nice to know a good welder, isn't it? I can't pick up my newly-purchased 1972 Compact Jr for another week (it's three states away from me) but when I do, I want to get a friend of mine who is a professional welder to reinforce the frame, since I hear that it can be weak at the tongue/body point. Are you planning to just add steel reinforcement bars there, or are you going to add a central beam going under the front center, and out to the hitch? I'm not sure exactly what to tell my buddy to do when I get mine home.
Unfortunately I do not yet have a decent background knowledge of trailer framing specifics or hitches and tongues. So I will have to take a pass on this question.

I would suggest you re-post your question in the section designated for towing, hitching, axles and running gear. I would very much appreciate it that no one answers your question in this thread as it will then be lost from easy access by others who also are also very much in need of that valuable specific knowledge.
__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2016, 08:36 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
removing a section of rotted floor

I have been working on removing a section of flooring just inside the door that had significant rot in it. Along that doorway wall the rot went fully along the edge of the 4' wide area against the entry wall and also extended further up the sides. Then there was a large area right as you walk in the aisle that extended in about 15".

If the rot had just been a small area I would have cleaned it out and filled it with thickened epoxy. However this being an area that will have a lot of stress on it from the in and out traffic and also while standing there to prepare meals I decided that structurally I really needed to replace a wider panel that ran all the way from side to side so that the point load of a human body would be spread out over a wide area for stability and longevity of use over the years.

The plywood floor in my Campster was installed with thickened epoxy onto the fiberglass under shell. I do appreciate that it was done that way even while I am doing the fairly miserable task of prying up that old plywood. At least that is what I keep telling myself as I am working.

The first task was to decide on how large a section of flooring needed to be removed. I settled on 17" as being the minimum and of course it had to be at least 4 foot wide as was the original flooring. My piece is a little longer as they had also added some addition plywood sections at each side of that 4' width. The original floor is 3/8" thick, my plywood piece is metric so it is very slightly thinner which is nice as that leaves room for adhesive under it to level it up to the rest of the floor.

I did some testing to see what would be the easiest way for me to remove the old flooring given the tools I had and also my hand strength and comfort. I do have some wear and tear arthritis in my hands so I do want to take it easy on them to avoid getting into too much inflammation. Slow and steady is the speed I drive My test quickly sorted out that if I scored the plywood into approximately 3/4" inch squares I could quickly pop out the chunks using an old garage sale purchase chisel. This is not a task for your good chisels.

First I used my replacement piece of plywood to mark my line onto the old floor for the area I was going to remove. Then guiding along that line with a straight edge I cut that line down into the original plywood floor using my small Porter Cable circular saw that was set to just shy of 3/8" in depth. That nice straight line will give me a good fit between the original floor and the replacement piece.

To create the hash grid of small squares I used a carbide coated, grinding type of blade in a Dremel Saw Max. That carbide grit coated blade is forgiving of not being guided with a straight edge or run in a perfectly straight line since it is a grinder rather than a regular saw blade. So that made cutting the small squares go very quickly as I did not have to stay as focused on not binding up the saw blade while making cuts. My back is not as limber as it used to be so being able to be a little sloppy in cutting the hash grids was of real benefit as far as personal comfort went. I can work very precisely but don't always need to . The grinding blade also gives me a wider space for getting a chisel into the kerf. This saw depth was set just shy of 3/8" to avoid any possibility of cutting into the shell.

I did need to be sure to avoid cutting into the bolts in this area that tied the fiberglass shell down to the trailer frame. I could not get them out because they were epoxied in place with wet epoxy engaging into the threads when the original floor was set in place. You can see in the photo below where I stopped that lowest line on the left where I stopped the cut line just short of one of the bolts. Oh well, no big deal, I just cut around them and leave them in place. They are not hurting anything being there. I will make clearance holes for them in the new floor panel and add in two new hold down bolts through the new floor section. Someday a new frame underneath but not this year.

Hooray, only 15 more inches of old plywood to remove then some cleanup work with a different style of carbide grit grinding tool to get rid of the last of the old wood fibers. Tomorrow I can mix up thickened epoxy and install the replacement plywood piece. Of all the remodeling work that needed to be done this is actually the most yucky of the jobs with all that sawdust it generated. (Yes of course I take safety precautions and I use respiratory protection!)
__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2016, 10:48 PM   #38
Member
 
Name: Elizabeth
Trailer: TrailsWest
Washington
Posts: 40
More window handle/latch pix

Passenger side window from the inside. The handle/latch is missing from the other side so I'm interested in what you come up with to replace it. It appears to be held on by glue or some such (no rivets or screws in sight)

There is a spring clip that latches into a grove in the vertical bar. The window is NOT latched in these pictures but you can see the grove where the latch fits...

I figure that a piece of wood or some such in the track should be a good enough latch so I'm not obsessing about the latching part. Besides, right now the windows are hard enough to open without messing with the latch.

I'm also really interested about the screens. I tested a piece from one of the build-it-yourself screen kits in the grove outside the sliding part of the windows and its a good fit. Actually maybe a bit tight. I think I'm going to use some old bits from that kit to rig up something temporary if the bugs get bad when I go camping in a couple weeks. Not a big trip but the first time I'll actually get to sleep in my trailer.
Attached Thumbnails
campster window interior2.jpg   campster window interior1.jpg  

__________________
Elizabeth in Eastern WA
Elizabeth EWA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2016, 11:25 PM   #39
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
My back was locked up today so I thought it was going to be a get nothing done day but then a friend came to the rescue I decided in order to get that old resin and plywood remnants leveled without making a long term career out of it that the job it would be best done with a nice sized belt sander and some coarse grit sandpaper. That meant I needed to borrow my friend's sander since I had sold mine several years ago. Fortunately the man came with the tool and he job got done with no stress on me. He also got out his offset grinder and took care of removing some old rusty bolts for me.

Tomorrow is plywood installation day! That is a big step forward. I would have done it this evening but I crawled in bed with a muscle relaxer and the two cats.

It is good to celebrate whenever I get to cross something major off the list such as the floor repair. I think I will celebrate with buying a much needed new 30 amp electrical inlet. Gee I sure do know how have a wild celebration
__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2016, 06:17 AM   #40
Senior Member
 
theresa p's Avatar
 
Name: theresa
Trailer: Outback (by Trillium) 2004
New Brunswick
Posts: 1,339
Registry
Karin---you party animal, you!

Hoping your back is feeling much better. I am looking forward to seeing the new floor.
__________________
theresa p is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2016, 08:29 AM   #41
Senior Member
 
Bobbie Mayer's Avatar
 
Name: Bobbie
Trailer: Trails West Campster 1970/Escape 15A
Washington
Posts: 3,042
Registry
Ironically, I have screens. But the windows aren't opening (again). When I have time I'll clean them out again and now that I store the trailer inside they'll probably stay cleaner. No handles on my sliding glass, though. I was just pushing them from the outside. I just don't need them to open often up here in Washington. But if anyone needs screen pattern or pictures let me know.
__________________
Bobbie Mayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2016, 09:22 AM   #42
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1980 18' Sunrader Motorhome and 1971 Trails West CampMite Campster
Washington
Posts: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbie Mayer View Post
Ironically, I have screens. But the windows aren't opening (again). When I have time I'll clean them out again and now that I store the trailer inside they'll probably stay cleaner. No handles on my sliding glass, though. I was just pushing them from the outside. I just don't need them to open often up here in Washington. But if anyone needs screen pattern or pictures let me know.
I will get my handles made sometime in the next few weeks. If I have enough material I will make some extra pairs. They will be very easy to install, just clean the glass, peel of the backing paper on the adhesive strip. Press the handle to the glass, then wait 72 hours before pulling on the handles.
__________________

__________________
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
campster


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lite House Renovation Bill&Pat General Chat 13 08-25-2012 07:28 PM
1970 Campster Renovation Chris McGurk Modifications, Alterations and Updates 4 06-03-2012 04:24 AM
Renovation/Fix-Up... Easier or Harder than you thought? Buck62 General Chat 22 02-18-2007 04:00 PM
1973 Compact Junior Renovation Barb Egeland Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 01-10-2006 04:25 PM
Closet Renovation Legacy Posts Modifications, Alterations and Updates 8 06-18-2003 04:14 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.