Kitchen or no kitchen? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-25-2016, 10:38 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Roger C H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: 2009 Trillium 1300 "Homelet"/2014 Subaru Outback "Rosie"
Washington
Posts: 2,172
Registry
Smile Tent? We don't need no stinkin' tent!

We bought Homelet to get away from wet canvas, wind, bugs, rain, etc.

We have a small toaster oven for toast and use the stove mainly for heating water. We also do dishes by heating water in our biggest pot, pouring some in the sink with detergent, wash in the sink, rinse in the big pot.

Donna is correct. THE INTERIOR STRUCTURE IS PART OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE EGG and you are asking for trouble by removing any part of it.

We carry drinking water in a couple of former apple juice jugs and forego use of the water tank. This avoids contamination, mold, freezing, and a lot of other problems. We got some water from the site faucet a week ago and it was the color of tea. We will use (clean) site water for washing dishes and (who cares) water for flushing the porta-potti. We heat with an oil-filled radiator. Of course this means always having electricity.

We use both beds. The rear one is permanent and the front one becomes our game table, eating table, etc as needed. The size of the bed is not the big thing, it is the crawling over the other person to use the porta-potti at night.
__________________

__________________
A charter member of the Buffalo Plaid Brigade!

Whether you think you can or think you can't, you're right.
Roger C H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 11:35 AM   #16
Member
 
Name: Tim
Trailer: boler
Ontario
Posts: 44
I have removed my kitchen from my 13 boler and done a slight mod to the bench. Everything inside is now wood which allows drawers under the front bench and a small corner cabinet for the coffee and tea makers. . I putnin a porta loo so we don't have to get out at night especially when it's raining. The bed is now a queen size. Allows more room for us and the 4 mini dogs. You'd be surprised at how much room they take up. When we had the kitchen inside it was too small to do anything and I felt the bigger bed and porta loo superseded the kitchen. If it's that crappy outside I rather enjoy a meal at the restaurant. Otherwise I get outside and cook. In mid summer cooking inside just adds to the heat that's already gonna make it hard to sleep.
__________________

__________________
slimmit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 11:49 AM   #17
Junior Member
 
Name: Alex
Trailer: Boler 1300
Alberta
Posts: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by slimmit View Post
I have removed my kitchen from my 13 boler and done a slight mod to the bench. Everything inside is now wood which allows drawers under the front bench and a small corner cabinet for the coffee and tea makers. . I putnin a porta loo so we don't have to get out at night especially when it's raining. The bed is now a queen size. Allows more room for us and the 4 mini dogs. You'd be surprised at how much room they take up. When we had the kitchen inside it was too small to do anything and I felt the bigger bed and porta loo superseded the kitchen. If it's that crappy outside I rather enjoy a meal at the restaurant. Otherwise I get outside and cook. In mid summer cooking inside just adds to the heat that's already gonna make it hard to sleep.
Ideally I'd like to design something that maximizes storage space but still allows room for the fridge and water storage, so maybe I'll make a stacked kitchen that utilizes vertical space instead of horizontal space. I figure if I can have removable water storage (20L at least) over top of a small sink and a 12V fridge on the bottom I'd have enough room on a front dinette table for a coleman stove if the weather gets really gnarly.
__________________
AJCmedia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 12:08 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Name: None
Trailer: None
None
Posts: 2,730
Coleman states that their fuel powered stoves /lanterns are NOT to be used indoors. Coleman does not give a reason nor and explanation just a definative statement .
__________________
steve dunham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 12:12 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Johnny M's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: '71 Boler, '87 Play-Mor II
Deep South
Posts: 1,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJCmedia View Post
Ideally I'd like to design something that maximizes storage space but still allows room for the fridge and water storage, so maybe I'll make a stacked kitchen that utilizes vertical space instead of horizontal space. I figure if I can have removable water storage (20L at least) over top of a small sink and a 12V fridge on the bottom I'd have enough room on a front dinette table for a coleman stove if the weather gets really gnarly.
That was kind of our thought too, we have a coleman stove we can use inside if we have too. Since making our bed permanent, I am working on a folding L shaped table so we can use it when sitting on our bed and the bottom bunk when in couch mode. There is room above our fridge for a toaster oven which will be removable when not needed. Our shower stall is a utility sink and so it does double duty as a sink for washing dishes/hand washing and can also serve as a tub for our toddler and for washing clothes if needed...I will also have a small outside sink too at some point for dishes/handwashing with our outdoor kitchen...
__________________
Johnny M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 01:34 PM   #20
Moderator
 
Name: RogerDat
Trailer: 77 Scamp 13
Michigan
Posts: 3,080
You are going to have a kitchen one way or another, inside or outside, unless you only eat at restaurants or eat packaged snacks. We cook outside almost 100% of the time. Even when we had a motor home cooking was outside but food prep was often inside Outside or inside you have to bring "stuff" that takes up space someplace.

You can adapt to have food that won't require cooking or prep. Eggs & Sausage on the griddle, or bagels & sausage sandwiches in foil over coals are good for breakfast but so is some yogurt and/or granola. Hamburgers on the grill with baked beans or ham and cheese sandwich with some chips. Or you provide small electric alternatives such as toaster oven, sandwich maker, hot plate, or electric skillet and make sure you have power.

You do need to have food that allows you to go with the flow because sooner or later weather or situation will come along that will make outside cooking unattractive option. Not all Walmarts or rest areas, or truck stops are going to be good with you firing up the stove on the tailgate so you have to plan for that situation. Rain and high winds may make outside canopy a poor idea unless you think sacrificing a canopy to the wind makes mother nature take pity on you and brings on good weather.

Must be able to make coffee so no one gets hurt by the crazy people in the little white camper but that can be off of battery or just enough stove time to boil water to make a batch to store in the thermos. Decent instant is better than random slaughter and blood curdling sobs and screams. Tea will work in a pinch.

If you ever have had a flooded Coleman liquid fuel stove then you will know why they say to only use outside. Unless to signal a ship at sea for rescue, several foot high flame good for that too. I think the lack of low oxygen shut off and minor explosion potential from propane leaks are probably at least part of the motivation. I have stuff from back in at least the 60's that has that warning. On the heater I have always wondered what do they think I'm going to use this for outside? Maybe it has to do with using them in tents?

People check their RV propane system for leaks, they also own them in the event there is a leak any damage is on them not Coleman. The joints in an RV gas system are not screwed on and off the way a 1 lb. propane bottle is, who checks their propane lantern for leaks with soapy water every time they change the bottle? Not saying it will kill you but using a lantern for heat or a stove inside certainly does carry some risk. If nothing else that hot lantern will do some serious damage if it falls over as can the heat from a stove grate after it gets hot.
__________________
RogerDat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 02:39 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Name: Anne
Trailer: 2014 Parkliner2016
North Carolina
Posts: 135
We did a compromise that has worked well for us. For built-ins, we have a 3 way fridge and a sink, but no stove. (Thanks, Thom for that idea.) We have 2 separate butane cookers that can be used indoors or out. Since our dishes and utensils are stored in the camper, cleaning them in the sink has been more convenient than washing outside, though we can clean larger items outside if easier. If nice we eat out, if not so nice, inside is fine. And we have extra counter space.
__________________
neparker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 03:12 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Dennis mn's Avatar
 
Name: Dennis
Trailer: Scamp
Minnesota
Posts: 261
We moved from a tent to a pop-up with no kitchen. I continued to cook outside under an awning, or a rain fly. With the Scamp, I cook outside a portion of the time, I do however appreciate the stove inside of the trailer, and having hot running water for cleanup!
__________________
1999 Scamp Fifth Wheel, pulled by a 2014 Nissan Frontier Pro4-X
Dennis mn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 04:29 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Kai in Seattle's Avatar
 
Name: Kathleen
Trailer: Amerigo FG-16 1973 "Peanut"
Washington
Posts: 1,513
Registry
Hi; very interested in this thread--

OK- what's a PITA?

And just in case and off topic, what's SMH? Seeing it around a lot lately.

Thanks!

Kai, puzzled pup
__________________
Kai in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 04:35 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
sokhapkin's Avatar
 
Name: Sergey
Trailer: 2014 Scamp 16 layout 4
SW Florida
Posts: 598
Pain In The Ass
Shaking My Head

Internet Slang words - Internet Dictionary - InternetSlang.com
__________________
Sergey
www.callwithus.com
sokhapkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 04:36 PM   #25
Junior Member
 
Name: Bill
Trailer: Trillium 1300
British Columbia
Posts: 16
My wife and I have a Trillium 1300 that we are fixing up. Decided on taking out the stove so we can have more counter space. The sink is still in the origional spot. We cook out side as much as we can and if there is bad weather then we just use the coleman inside. Much prefer having the extra (flat) counter space than a second stove that does not get used very much.
__________________
Material Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 04:41 PM   #26
Junior Member
 
Name: Alex
Trailer: Boler 1300
Alberta
Posts: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Material Guy View Post
My wife and I have a Trillium 1300 that we are fixing up. Decided on taking out the stove so we can have more counter space. The sink is still in the origional spot. We cook out side as much as we can and if there is bad weather then we just use the coleman inside. Much prefer having the extra (flat) counter space than a second stove that does not get used very much.
Ya, that's what I may also consider. I'll likely remove the furnace and replace the fridge with a 12V fridge so if I can do away with the gas system on the trailer completely that would be ideal for me.
__________________
AJCmedia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 05:00 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,142
To me, cooking inside is much easier than cooking outside. For the latter I have to set up the camp stove and then make multiple trips out the door with stuff... followed by more trips to get the things I forgot. Then carry it all back inside after dinner. I think, why bother with all of that when everything's within reach inside the trailer?

The exception, of course, is when I want to grill. Can't do that in the trailer anyhow! But the rest of the meal still gets cooked inside, usually.
__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 05:09 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Name: None
Trailer: None
None
Posts: 2,730
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJCmedia View Post
Ya, that's what I may also consider. I'll likely remove the furnace and replace the fridge with a 12V fridge so if I can do away with the gas system on the trailer completely that would be ideal for me.
If I may ask ,What is the advantage of removing the propane and running the refrigerator on 12 VDC ?. I have a 100 watt solar system but even that is inadequate to supply enough power to run my refrigerator on 12 volts.
__________________

__________________
steve dunham is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Boler's new kitchen and other mods Lizbeth Modifications, Alterations and Updates 17 03-14-2008 11:28 AM
Casita Liberty Kitchen Remodel Chris B Modifications, Alterations and Updates 16 02-17-2008 05:18 PM
Surfside Front Kitchen Miriam Modifications, Alterations and Updates 20 03-20-2006 02:31 PM
Remodeling the Kitchen Jackie Modifications, Alterations and Updates 16 01-02-2006 09:12 PM
The kitchen is now a decent place Myron Leski Modifications, Alterations and Updates 18 12-04-2005 02:06 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.