LED lights in Original light sockets - tail lights - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-27-2009, 02:08 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
The Hobo's Avatar
 
Name: Ulysse
Trailer: 1976 Triple E Surfside
Posts: 172
Quote:
My tail lights are not very bright. The Surfside has 8" not-quite square lights that don't seem to be easily replaced with the new LED tail light units (which was my first choice). Plan B - I was thinking of replacing the bulbs in the stock tail light units with LED replacement bulbs. Anyone with experience or comments?
I just changed all my lights on my Surf Side with LED.
I used lights from [b]Princess Auto.
The marker lights are part [b]#8122194 (Red) and [b]#8122202 (Amber).
Now for the rear tail lights,I used the Led#8024899 6" Oval assemblies(they will fit right into your existing lenses),and you can,t even tell they,re there ti,ll you have/use the lights.

I did however cut out the oval shape inside the old lens assembly itself, so it would fit properly,
then simply glued the new assembly, to the inside of the old lens rear assembly.

The difference between the bulbs, and the LED,s is[b] INCREDIBLE.

And for added safety, I purchased a rear brake light assembly, and mounted it on the rear of the trailer.

Sure don,t want anyone rear ending my Baby.!!!!!!
__________________

__________________
1976 Surfside Tripple-E
The Hobo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2009, 04:56 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Roy in TO's Avatar
 
Name: Roy
Trailer: 1972 boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500
Ontario
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
There are many good things about LED taillights, but the one thing that drives me nuts is how bright the taillights are (as opposed to the brake lights). Regular old taillights always seemed perfectly visible to me, as they should be
I feel the advantage to the LED's being brighter is when the weather is not so great, i.e. fog or rain, it makes your visibility better. Same thing for when in bright sunlight. If I can't clearly see the tail lights on in front of me, my headlights go on to make my rear end more visible. We are not talking butts here either.
__________________

__________________
Roy in TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2009, 05:30 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Raya's Avatar
 
Name: Rachel
Trailer: 1974 Boler 13 ft (Neonex/Winnipeg)
Posts: 3,014
Roy,

I agree that visible is good. Now, maybe this comes from my boating background, but I just feel that lights are not only to be seen, but to convey a message. In boating, for example, you don't just put on as many lights as possible (even though that might make you more visible), because certain patterns or numbers of lights mean certain things, and when you violate those, the meaning is lost. So when a boat just "puts on all the lights to be visible," you might know something is over there on the water, but you no longer have any idea what that something is doing. With the proper pattern/number of lights, you know, for example, "Oh, that's a dredge, he's got minimum maneuverability, and I can safely pass to his right but not his left side."

So to apply this to vehicles on a roadway, lower-intensity red lights mean "I'm here driving" and really bright red lights mean "HEY, I'M PUTTING THE BRAKES ON HERE!" I find that the LED taillights in their non-braking position are as bright as brake lights. Very distracting, and they convey the wrong message (yes they get brighter when you brake, but they are at "brake light intensity" normally).

I know for myself, really bright red taillights are starting to have a lot less meaning to me now that they don't specifically mean "I'm braking." They're so bright that I basically try to tune them out so they are not so bothersome. End result, I'll be ignoring your vehicle (or any other one that looks like it has brake lights on 24/7), and concentrating on the vehicles whose lights can tell me something besides just "I'm braking! No, wait, I'm not. No, I am! No, I'm not..."

Now separate fog lights (in the rear) for fog or low-light conditions are great, in my book. But then they don't distract me from the meaning of the tail/brake lights. (My car has separate lights in the back, for example, for driving in fog or other low-visibility conditions.)

I realize that most people here (myself included) cannot control the brightness of LED lights. It's too bad the manufacturers don't. (Does anyone know if there are lumens [intensity] guidelines for things like taillights vs. brake-lights?] Or, even better, perhaps do something like boats and have different colors for different functions, vs. just a brighter version of the same color (not likely to happen, I know).

I was thrilled when cars started coming with amber rear turn signals. On cars that have them, you can now tell the difference between just "seeing" (what you think is) one brake light up ahead (that was really a left lane-change signal) and seeing a real left lane-change signal. Also, with my amber lights in the rear, I can put on my four-way flashers AND my brake lights at the same time (e.g. when all traffic is coming to a sudden stop on the freeway). You can't do that without the ambers that I know of. I use that feature often and hate to be without it when I'm towing. I wonder if I could wire up some amber lights on my trailer, come to think of it...

I know I'm ranting, but I just hate to see new stuff that's (to my mind) not an improvement in safety.

Okay, back to my formerly mild-mannered self

Raya
__________________
Raya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 06:45 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Carol Ann in TO's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1972 Boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500 (plus 2 Rhodesian Ridgebacks)
Posts: 367
Registry
Raya: Believe me, it WILL be an improvement when Roy is able to change out the tail lights for LEDs. It's me that checks the back end before we leave and I have had to go up within a couple of feet some days to see if the lights are really doing what they are supposed to be doing. The originals just do not have enough lumens to be safely effective.

Carol Ann
__________________
Carol Ann in TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 07:07 PM   #19
Member
 
ddayton's Avatar
 
Trailer: 2007 Casita 17 ft Spirit Deluxe
Posts: 84
Send a message via Yahoo to ddayton
Quote:
<snip>I have had to go up within a couple of feet some days to see if the lights are really doing what they are supposed to be doing. The originals just do not have enough lumens to be safely effective.
Carol Ann
Carol Ann here is an example of what daytime improvement you can expect. In each photo the light on the left is LED and the one on the right is OEM - daytime conditions. The first photo is tail/running lights and the second is brake lights. (Click to enlarge the photo)

Click image for larger version

Name:	070_Talilight___LED_left___OEM_right.jpg
Views:	75
Size:	83.8 KB
ID:	17679


Click image for larger version

Name:	080_Brakelight___LED_left___OEM_right.jpg
Views:	75
Size:	83.4 KB
ID:	17680

Don
__________________
ddayton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2009, 09:11 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Raya's Avatar
 
Name: Rachel
Trailer: 1974 Boler 13 ft (Neonex/Winnipeg)
Posts: 3,014
Quote:
Raya: Believe me, it WILL be an improvement when Roy is able to change out the tail lights for LEDs. It's me that checks the back end before we leave and I have had to go up within a couple of feet some days to see if the lights are really doing what they are supposed to be doing. The originals just do not have enough lumens to be safely effective.

Carol Ann
Hmm, I wonder if the grounds are all good? Dim bulbs (in my experience) are often a result of poor ground connections. Although LEDs are bright, to be sure, regular bulbs shouldn't be "dim" if everything is working properly. Mine seem as bright as my car (I don't know yet if they use the same bulbs, but they may).

It sounds like you're going LED anyway, but perhaps this will be good information for someone else who thinks that regular bulbs just "are" dim.

Raya
__________________
Raya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 12:09 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Roy in TO's Avatar
 
Name: Roy
Trailer: 1972 boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500
Ontario
Posts: 4,954
Sorry Raya, we are doing it anyways.

I don't do anything with out thoroughly investigating it 1st. Some have gone so far as to label me as being anal retentive with my attention to detail. I've looked at thousands of tail and marker lights on the road while travelling. In my mind LED's give a better indication day and night in both good and inclemate weather. There has to be a reason all the buses, tractor trailers and now vehicle manufactures are opting to install much more expensive lights other than the cool factor.

The one line here that made up my mind was someone posting that once they installed the LED's, they found that they were more likely to be given room to change lanes They felt more people could see them signal during the day light. Considering any trip we take starts off on North America's busiest highway (14 lanes at our exit), I'll use any advantage I can get to help get onto the highway safely while towing.

I apologize if this bothers you, but I'd like to suggest that if you are having trouble trying to determine what the vehicle in front of you might be doing and worrying about it, then maybe you should back off a bit to give yourself more reaction time.

Light intensity is an inverse square proportional over distance. That means if you double the distance between you and the vehicle in front. The light intensity will be 1/4. Triple the distance and it will be 1/9.

OTOH I have no intention of switching out the tail lights on my pick up. Oh yeah, forgot to mention the grounds are all good, they are all new wires.
__________________
Roy in TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 03:05 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Raya's Avatar
 
Name: Rachel
Trailer: 1974 Boler 13 ft (Neonex/Winnipeg)
Posts: 3,014
Roy,

No need to be sorry about changing your taillights (?). They are yours, after all. I was just describing how I feel when driving behind vehicles with taillights that are as bright as brake lights have traditionally been. I figured that people might be interested to know how those behind them might feel (assuming I am not that unique). But as long as they are legal people can choose whether or not to install them. And even though they may have that one problem, they also have benefits, such as lasting a really long time, etc.

I do feel a bit hurt that you would assume I'm a tailgater. I have a commercial driver's license with well over a million miles on it, and have never had an at-fault accident. I drive conservatively, yet competently. I don't habitually speed or tailgate. I signal my turns, drive politely, and don't have a phone to my ear while doing so. I'm not saying that I'm the ultimate driver, but I do drive consciously, and with awareness, and I try my best to concentrate on the job at hand.

I now understand that your wiring is fine. The way Carol described your taillights they sounded dimmer than usual, and I've found that poor grounds can often cause that, so I mentioned it as something to check, not knowing at the time that you had replaced it.

I'm going to have to check my trailer now. I had assumed it used something like the "standard" 1157 bulbs that light up car taillights, but you know, I haven't actually looked yet. Perhaps they're smaller. All the lights on my Boler worked for the drive home when I bought it, and I haven't taken it out on the road again yet, so I haven't looked them over (before I take it out I'll check them out and make sure to have spare bulbs on hand).

Raya

Thinking about this a bit more I just wanted to add that my issue is not an "uncomfortable" brightness when I'm close to vehicles with LED taillights. It's more of a "big picture" thing. Here's a real world example: I was driving through the outskirts of a major city a couple of weeks ago, at night. There were about six lanes of traffic going in my direction. So I probably had about fifty vehicles on my "I'm not staring right at each individual vehicle but I'm still keeping an eye on all of these guys" list.

Of course I watch as many vehicles as I can directly. But since there is a limit to how many vehicles I can do this for at once, there is another tier of vehicles for whom I am only "watching" for something out of the ordinary to strike my driving sub-conscious. These are the vehicles that are not the few immediately adjacent to me, but maybe two lanes over and four ahead, or something like that.

There was one vehicle that night, in that tier, that had LED taillights, and they were about the brightness of typical brake lights. So that vehicle kept saying "Whoa! I'm braking!" to my subconscious. The first few times I just took my foot off the gas to assess (not wanting to cause chain reaction of braking behind me until I knew there was a reason to). After the fourth or fifth time I basically just put that sector on ignore, as I felt it was distracting me, and by this time I knew these were not brake lights that were catching my attention.

I don't know how it works for other people, but this is how I drive. I guess I internalized those "Smith System of Driving" filmstrips in school "Get the Big Picture," they intoned, "And Always Leave an Out!' I can still picture those cars, the black-and-white film strip with it's "boop" to advance the strip, and each of the (presumably Smith) men in "man hats" and suits. Hee!

I'm sure some of you are rolling your eyes at this point and wishing I'd shut up. But I like driving, and I take pride in being a good driver, so when someone perhaps thinks that I've been tailgating or etc. it's very hard not to explain myself further. Especially when this is a forum that somewhat revolves around driving.
__________________
Raya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 05:46 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Donna D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Donna D
Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
Oregon
Posts: 24,433
The one thing I've noticed about the old wedding cake style taillights on my Scamp, is they get dirty on the inside, certainly not a sealed unit. If an individual chooses to keep the old skool lights, it might be a good idea to take the lens off occasionally and give it a good scrubbing. Polishing the outside may help too as the reflecto plastic gets foggy. Sorta like the plastics used in headlight covers... ever noticed how foggy and yellowed some of those are on some cars? Light may pass through the lens better.
__________________
Donna D.
Ten Forward - 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Double Yolk - 1988 16' Scamp Deluxe
Donna D. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 09:17 AM   #24
Member
 
ddayton's Avatar
 
Trailer: 2007 Casita 17 ft Spirit Deluxe
Posts: 84
Send a message via Yahoo to ddayton
An excellent point Donna!

Plastic lenses and ammonia are not compatible. The plastic will discolor and that absolutely does reduce the amount of light that will pass through them.

In yesteryear I had a set of the plastic headlight covers discolor on my beloved car. After a bit of checking I determined that it was my fault. When cleaning a car I had always used Windex, with ammonia, on the windows and the glass headlights. Continuing that practice with the plastic headlight covers was the cause of the discoloration I remember that changing out those lenses was not cheap for a low ranking GI. Guess the same could happen to the taillights.

Don
__________________
ddayton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 11:21 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Greg A's Avatar
 
Name: Greg
Trailer: 2015 Escape 19
Arizona
Posts: 1,828
Changing over to LED taillights and marker lights is light years better when compared to the originals.
We changed ours over almost immediately two years ago and the difference is astounding in the visibility of the trailer in daytime and nighttime conditions. The original trailer lights were just inadequate and the higher visibility has to equate to much safer towing conditions, especially since we seem to be prone to folks riding our bumper when we go 60 out on the interstates.
This is one Mod that everyone should look into and consider doing, as the cost is not that great but the return could be huge....

My two cents.
__________________
Owner:
Fiberglass-RV-4Sale.com
Scamp Owners International
2015 Escape 19 & 1997 Scamp 19
Greg A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 11:48 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
The Hobo's Avatar
 
Name: Ulysse
Trailer: 1976 Triple E Surfside
Posts: 172
Quote:
Changing over to LED taillights and marker lights is light years better when compared to the originals.
We changed ours over almost immediately two years ago and the difference is astounding in the visibility of the trailer in daytime and nighttime conditions. The original trailer lights were just inadequate and the higher visibility has to equate to much safer towing conditions, especially since we seem to be prone to folks riding our bumper when we go 60 out on the interstates.
This is one Mod that everyone should look into and consider doing, as the cost is not that great but the return could be huge....

My two cents.
Amen to that!!

Another bad thing about the "old bulbs type", is at times they work, and sometimes act up(usually grounding issues).
However,what happens when/if bulbs don,t come on, at the very time you need it to come on,???=Bang.!!

You can never be too safe,
and swaping out the type of lighting is a very small price to pay for "everyone's Safety"

JMO
__________________
1976 Surfside Tripple-E
The Hobo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 03:58 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Raya's Avatar
 
Name: Rachel
Trailer: 1974 Boler 13 ft (Neonex/Winnipeg)
Posts: 3,014
Quote:
Another bad thing about the "old bulbs type", is at times they work, and sometimes act up(usually grounding issues).
However,what happens when/if bulbs don,t come on, at the very time you need it to come on,???=Bang.!!
Ulysse,

So the new, LED bulbs do not rely on a good ground to work properly? That's good to know. I understand the basics of wiring, but only the very basics, so I hadn't realized this.

I assume they need some level of grounding to work at all though, right? So the difference must be that they are able to be very bright with even a somewhat faulty ground, whereas the traditional bulbs require a good ground in order to be bright? Live and learn

Tangent note on non-LED bulbs: On my previous trailers (non-camping type), I've always wired a dedicated ground wire back to the vehicle connector, because I found that the "built in" ball ground too often produced dim lights. That just didn't seem like it should be so, since the same bulbs in a car produced fine light. The lighting did improve immensely with a proper ground. I haven't even looked to see how the Boler is wired yet (lights were bright for the drive home and havne't camped away from home yet).

On the faded/clouded plastic lense issue:

I've had quite good results in clearing up discolored/scratched plastic lenses with the plastic lens restoration compounds such as from Meguiars and 3M. They are basically a kit of two very find grades of rubbing compound. I first used them on the really opaque windows of a friend's Jeep-like soft top (Tracker). Prior to that (pre-Internet searching), I had used "Brite Boy Chrome Polish" for my headlights; I think it's just another fine rubbing compound.

I've seen the "Windex"/ammonia thing has cause more damage to polycarbonate (Lexan) hatch lenses on boats (in the form of crazing)! Of course it's totally natural to squirt some on when cleaning "glass." Argh.

Raya
__________________
Raya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 08:05 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Greg A's Avatar
 
Name: Greg
Trailer: 2015 Escape 19
Arizona
Posts: 1,828
Actually, the poor performance and intermittent operation of the old style taillights that Ulysse is referring to is very rarely a grounding issue.
It is usually a problem with the old style bulb sockets, the spring loaded contact piece and the way they rely on making contact with the bulb at two small contact points with the spring pressure keeping that tight. Very poor design and as they age they get corroded, rusty and/or the spring gets weaker and as the trailer bounces the bulbs go on and off, or they dim.
The new LED tailights don't have that type of setup and are a direct connection which is more reliable in addition to being more visible.
__________________

__________________
Owner:
Fiberglass-RV-4Sale.com
Scamp Owners International
2015 Escape 19 & 1997 Scamp 19
Greg A is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
led lights, lighting, lights, tail lights


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Very Dim Tail Lights Will Wi Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 2 07-16-2008 10:23 AM
New Original Trillium Tail Lights D Martin Modifications, Alterations and Updates 9 01-23-2007 03:29 PM
LED lights in Original light sockets Gerry Modifications, Alterations and Updates 21 01-05-2007 02:03 PM
Adding 12v Sockets & Lights peterh Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 17 12-13-2006 04:24 PM
Original 1976 Boler interior Lights Gord Plowright Classified Archives 0 06-20-2006 09:11 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.