nose mask for Bigfoot - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-20-2007, 08:27 AM   #1
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Hello:

i am considering trading off my stick built trailer for another Bigfoot. I am thinking about the 21 or perhaps the 25. I will probably have to purchase new, which is expensive! I do some camping in Forestry site and off the highway campgrounds, and have concerns abour rock chips on the front of the trailer. My current trailer has a rock guard material sprayed across the front, but it looks unattractive. Has anyone had a 'bra' or front end mask made, perhaps the type of material used in boat tops. with stainless snaps for removal?

Thanks

Rick B
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Old 06-20-2007, 01:21 PM   #2
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I had this made out of the heaviest material the local upholstery guy had with a soft backing. However, I'm not sure it would protect against serious rocks but I'm comfortable with gravel.
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Old 06-20-2007, 04:10 PM   #3
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Great idea Steve.

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Old 06-20-2007, 08:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
I had this made out of the heaviest material the local upholstery guy had with a soft backing. However, I'm not sure it would protect against serious rocks but I'm comfortable with gravel.
That is what I had in mind, but into two halves due to the propane tank cover on the Bigfoot.

Thanks
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Old 06-21-2007, 06:17 PM   #5
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Rick...you should have known that having been a Bigfoot owner once, nothing else would ever do.

Paul
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Old 06-21-2007, 06:38 PM   #6
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The dealer recommends Rhino lining, a spray on product used for pickup truck beds etc. I got an estimate at $800
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Old 06-21-2007, 07:03 PM   #7
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And what makes the Rhino brand different than the My current trailer has a rock guard material sprayed across the front, but it looks unattractive. you mentioned in your first post?

I don't have anything like that on my trailer, my only experience was on a car. AND IT WAS A HUGE MISTAKE. There was just enough movement (air?) that caused the bra to move ever so slightly. Overtime the bra had chaffed the paint to the point the car was actually rusting in spots under the bra. I'll never have one again on any vehicle. Okay so fiberglass isn't going to rust, but the gel coat could be chaffed in the same manner.

This however is a possibility (sorry you have to be a member of the CasitaForum to view):
Trailer Protection
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Old 06-21-2007, 10:08 PM   #8
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Rick,

You might want to consider 3M protective film, certainly not cheap, but also does not detract from the trailer's appearance. A friend of mine had it applied to his Bigfoot several years ago, and it seems to work well. Both he and I refrain from extensive gravel road travel, so I cannot say it totally eliminates rock chips from personal experience.

I can say, however, that if I had a local installer for this product I would have it applied in a heartbeat. I think the film is too expensive to risk a botched do-it-yourself attempt, so I may yet be forced to journey a couple of hours to find a professional installer.



http://www.automotivearticles.com/Clear_Bra_3M.shtml



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Old 06-21-2007, 10:31 PM   #9
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Rick,

You might want to consider 3M protective film,


Steve.
+++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks Steve. It was suggested that the 'clear bra', being the protective film, as an option. I was advised that it may yellow with age, but with UV protection, should not be an issue. I would prefer the clear bra to Rhino, as you can't remove it after it is installed. I am weighting gelcoat repairs to pro-active treatment.

I don't do a lot of gravel, but some local campgrounds are being converted to residential uses, requiring me to consider more use of BC Parks or Forestry sites.

I am wondering how effective those broom style thingies are that hang below your hitch and parallel the bumper?

Thanks

Rick
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Old 06-22-2007, 12:00 AM   #10
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--><div class='quotemain'>
I am wondering how effective those broom style thingies are that hang below your hitch and parallel the bumper?
Thanks
Rick [/quote]
I was told, by one who had used these, that they do not work very well. He said that they tended to fly back due to air flow while moving, thus exposing the trailer to rock damage. Sure enough, I observed exactly this effect while watching passing RV's on the highway. Something much stiffer seemed to be needed.

I made up a extra full width "mudflap" out of old rubber conveyer belt attached to a removable square tube bolted to brackets on my hitch mounts. This was quite stiff and did not bend too much due to airflow, which protected the trailer well. The bottom edge was 2 to 3" off the road surface, but you have to be careful with this clearance on rough roads. If the bottom edge of the flap actually touches the gravel, it will spray up rocks and become a source of rock damage. If you are running on rough rutted roads, more clearance will be necessary. The rear overhang of the tow vehicle also comes into play here, I was able to have the flap closer to the ground because my Explorer had a short overhang. Changes in grade could cause the flap to drag, and this becomes more pronounced with longer overhangs. The key is to try place the flap as close to the rear tires as possible and as near to the ground as practical.

Unfortunately, I have recently changed tow vehicles so this fabricated rock guard will no longer fit, and there seems no easy way to implement a replacement due to hitch and exhaust pipe location. In the mean time, I have been avoiding long gravel road trips.

Steve.
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