Preparing a 1991 Scamp 16 - Page 13 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-15-2011, 09:53 AM   #169
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I went out and measured the current draw of one of our 64 LED bulbs. It was about 0.23 amps.

This compares to about 2.0 amps for the typical incandesant bulb.

This equates to about 1/8th the current to run an LED.

Norm
Thanks Norm for sharing this info. I installed some 68 LED bulbs in our Scamp and am happy with them so far. I only bought four of them and put them in lights that get used the most. Now I'm thinking I might do the rest of the lights.
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Old 08-15-2011, 12:32 PM   #170
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Norm... How much cooler are they? I've heard a few people say that once they install the LED lights that they notice a difference in how much heat that is given off.
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Old 08-15-2011, 03:48 PM   #171
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I did buy 8 of them, enough for all lights plus a couple of spares.

The LED's are cool compared to an incandescant. Certainly at least 1/8th the power being dissipated per bulb. It really means you can no longer use your lights as a 150 watt electric heater.

It will definitely help us on this years trips when boondocking.

Norm
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Old 08-19-2011, 03:05 PM   #172
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Screen Door

We've been considering a number of screen door options. The least expensive solution was the hanging curtain with the center magnets; we saw it on sale for around $10 and bought it. In part we choose this solution because we rarely seem to need mosquito protection.

Yesterday we tried it on the trailer. It works pretty well. You simply walk thru the center forcing the rather weak magnets apart. After you go thru they snap back together thru the magic of force at a distance.

(Force at a distance is the property of magnets where opposite poles attract. Actually no one in our world knows how this works. How do two things without any physical connection pull themselves togther? It's true magic.)

The curtain is designed for a 36" door so it's too wide and will need a little needle work. As well it needs to be hung above the door.

I mounted a board over the door to support the screen curtain. I also added a little shelf to the top of the board for things like our badges and keys. The mounts for the screen curtain will allow quickly remoxing the curtain when its not needed.

In the picture you'll notice a piece of red yarn, used to sub-consciously remind us of the top of the door way.
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Old 08-19-2011, 03:59 PM   #173
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Norm... How much cooler are they? I've heard a few people say that once they install the LED lights that they notice a difference in how much heat that is given off.
Can't speak to the 68 element LEDs but using an infrared thermometer I get 133F on a 36smd in a nozzle-style fixture as against 167F for an 1141 incandescent in same fixture. I have four 36s in the aft berth and two 68s in the galley; I will have to check the temp on the latter.

jack
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Old 08-19-2011, 05:17 PM   #174
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Jack, I went out and tested the temperature of our LEDs using the touch method. (The maximum temperature that one can keep their fingers in contact with something is between 114 and 120 degrees F.) I turned our lamp on for 5 minutes and was able to keep two fingers on the LEDs.

Norm
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Old 08-19-2011, 07:13 PM   #175
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Jack, I went out and tested the temperature of our LEDs using the touch method. (The maximum temperature that one can keep their fingers in contact with something is between 114 and 120 degrees F.) I turned our lamp on for 5 minutes and was able to keep two fingers on the LEDs.

Norm
Have to take it up with Rat Shack, Norm. You can each check the calibration of the "digits" on your--uh--instrumentation. I believe both you and I purchased the same 36 element bulbs but perhaps not. It is possible that the aluminum hood or nozzle is both collecting and holding heat on my 36s. I tried the rule of [scorched] thumb and I am too wimpy to keep my paws on the end elements of those for even 5 seconds. The elements in the 36s are larger in area than those in the 68s which I have. I took the plastic shields off the dome lights over the sink and I could keep thumb and forefinger on the 68s for 5 seconds but wouldn't have enjoyed 10 seconds. Not quite like leaving your fingerprint stuck to bearing cap but uncomfortable. After five minutes the 68s read 122F on the Ratshack thermometer.

I believe you will find that the lumens game with these is counterintuitive. I was told by the seller Shun Tam that his 36s produce more "light" than his 45smds. I'm not an electrical "train driver" but think that generally where there's light there's heat (resistance is resistance no matter whether in chips or wires). I checked the size of the elements in his illustration of the 45smd bulb and as expected they were smaller than those of the 36. So light and heat should correlate with total surface area of the smds and perhaps the 68s which I have also have a smaller total area of "smuds" than do the 36s which I have. One possibility of using a descriptor or rating based on number of light-producing elements (this n that quantity of smds) is that the potential customer will assume a higher no. promises a higher level of illumination and buy, say, a very long tower bulb with 102 elements and really not get that much more illumination. I'm betting the real correlation is to price of the bulb (the 45s were cheaper than the 36s, as were the 68s from a different seller). What think you?

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Old 08-19-2011, 07:41 PM   #176
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Jack 122 F is probably in the ball park for the finger test; I'm old and may have reduced sensitivity.

I did purchase the 68s. I have no quantitative way to measure temperature or light output other than my fingers and eyes. As to light output they look similar to the incandescents. Tomorrow I'll leave them on for a more extended period and see how the 'digits' hold up.

In general I would assume the light emitting area of the LEDs is the key parameter since I suspect most similarly colored, commonly available LEDs operate in the same efficiency range.

It would be interesting to measure the amount of current your 36's draw compared to the 68's.

Norm
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Old 08-19-2011, 08:39 PM   #177
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Norm, how do I check the current draw? Need a lead with gator clips and a multimeter or is there more to it than that?

jack
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Old 08-19-2011, 08:52 PM   #178
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Yes, set the meter to DC current and insert the meter between the base and 12 volts while touching the outer case to ground.

The way I did it was to loosen the bulb and pull it forward in the socket a little. With the meter on the current mode, I touch one probe to the contact of the lamp that normally contacts the bottom of the bulb amd the other to the bottom of the bulb.

Norm
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Old 08-19-2011, 10:09 PM   #179
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Yes, set the meter to DC current and insert the meter between the base and 12 volts while touching the outer case to ground.

The way I did it was to loosen the bulb and pull it forward in the socket a little. With the meter on the current mode, I touch one probe to the contact of the lamp that normally contacts the bottom of the bulb amd the other to the bottom of the bulb.

Norm
Kool, thanks.

jack
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Old 08-20-2011, 04:46 PM   #180
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Cool Air Pressurized Plenum for AC

Our air conditioner gets it's intake cool air via three holes in the closet floor and exits the hot exhaust thru another hole in the floor.

The exhaust hole has two muffin fans to push the air out of the bottom of the closet. My plan had been to use a baffle to seperate the exhaust from the intake. This works but it's not the best solution; I had always considered adding fans to the intake side.

To accomplish this I made a wooden duct about a 1.5 feet long whose opening is towards the center of the trailer. Two 100 cubic feet per minute, 12 volt muffin fans will be located in the duct. My feeling is that this will reduce the temperature of the exhaust air.

I will provide pictures in the morning.


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Old 08-21-2011, 01:58 PM   #181
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Wooden Duct

I completeted the wooden duct to be used to supply cool air to the air conditioner. This effectively seperates the hot exhaust from the cool intake air. With 2 muffin fans on the exhaust and 2 on the intake the air conditioner should have a more than adequate air supply.

Cool air enters on the right side of this picture and exhaust air exits in front of the sloping side.

And yes I painted the bottom of the trailer Rustoleum white.
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Old 09-02-2011, 12:40 AM   #182
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Hi Norm, Had a look at your A/C install very nice ,I like the ductwork under the trailer . You should have no air flow problems with that setup. Your whole trailer is full of great ideas you did a nice job. Thanks for sharing.
Take care, Ken
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