Removing Propane Tanks - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-12-2018, 07:11 PM   #21
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Name: Mark
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Added tongue box storage is great for all your leveling tools. I keep a single 11lbs propane tank inside it at all times.
With September and October temperatures and a passion for free camping, boondocking and gourmet home cooked meals, its hard to think about life without propane..
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Old 10-13-2018, 04:07 AM   #22
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Name: Gerry
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We camp a lot in the spring and fall and mostly in State or National parks with no hook-ups.
Also I don't think that the little cube heater I have would be as efficient as the propane furnace in heating my Casita Deluxe and wife is always worried about fire with electric heaters so I have 2- 13 LB aluminum tanks on the Casita and if on an extended stay I carry a regular 20 pounder in the truck just in case.
I use this 20 pounder to run the grill outside anyway but can hook it up to the camper if needed.
In New England it gets cold in the spring and fall and the furnace works great.
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Old 10-17-2018, 10:15 AM   #23
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Name: Stephen
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Hi Brenda,

I'm about halfway through a Casita Freedom conversion that will be all electric featuring induction cooking. I'm still keeping the propane tanks as a backup.
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Old 10-17-2018, 11:15 AM   #24
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Name: Phillip
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Removing propane tanks

I pulled the two tanks off our 93 17ft Burro, removed the stove, refrigerator and water heater. Replaced the water heater with a high efficiency 10 gal electric unit with a bottom drain, stove was replaced with a hot plate and the refrigerator with a cooler that keeps ice 4 plus days. Bought a 2000 watt inverter generator plus 50watt portable solar panel. My LP gas equipment was old and pretty well worn out so I went this way instead of replacing the old gas equipment. I camp in state parks and National Forrest (boone docking). I put a storage box on the tongue where the tanks had been located and freed up a lot of additional storage space where I pulled the gas stove and water heater out of. This lightened my empty weight by almost 200 lbs, gave me lots of additional storage space and allows me to be comfortable on or off grid for days. My total cost for the new equipment including the purchase of the generator and solar cells was less than what it would have run me to replace the old LP appliances and lines (<$900). We've used this set up for over a year with no regrets.
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Old 10-17-2018, 11:51 AM   #25
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RVs are a great Plan B in the event of a calamity or natural disaster like those seen recently in the South and East. It's not hard to imagine extended power outtages. Your RVs give you options, and the more options in your rv, the better. Allow me to put in a plug for having a few of these stacked in a home closet, and some Aqua-tainers filled with water: (Sorry, an old Boy Scout here).

https://www.amazon.com/Mountain-Hous...7I/ref=sr_1_1?
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Old 10-17-2018, 10:45 PM   #26
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MREs are a good option too. All military chow gets a bad rap no mater what it is but MREs are not all that bad. If you are looking for a long storing solution with known nutritional value they make a lot of sense.

If you google "72 hour kit" you will have all kinds of help assembling your own stuff for a lot less than what Amazon wants.

If you have an RV of any sort, it just makes sense to have a little set aside just in case. Hopefully you will throw it out in a few years because it is unused and expired. Then you can replace it with fresh stuff. It is the kind of insurance that costs very little but can save you a lot.
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Old 10-18-2018, 07:36 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by mizterwizard View Post
MREs are a good option too. All military chow gets a bad rap no mater what it is but MREs are not all that bad. If you are looking for a long storing solution with known nutritional value they make a lot of sense.

If you google "72 hour kit" you will have all kinds of help assembling your own stuff for a lot less than what Amazon wants.

If you have an RV of any sort, it just makes sense to have a little set aside just in case. Hopefully you will throw it out in a few years because it is unused and expired. Then you can replace it with fresh stuff. It is the kind of insurance that costs very little but can save you a lot.
ABSOLUTELY:

We do that with stuff purchased at Sams and other sources when things are on sale. Wife keeps it monitored and rotates it before it expires. That way we can eat it and replace it with new "sale" stuff. Very little loss or expense as we are eating and using instead of throwing away.

Similar to purchasing insurance and being able to get the premiums returned in full. To purchase new insurance. Win-Win
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Old 10-25-2018, 04:57 AM   #28
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Wink "Boondocking" vs "Dry Camping"

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Originally Posted by BrendaG View Post
Has anyone removed the propane tanks and gone total electric for a while? We are not boondockers and feel the two tanks are just added weight ... If we remove them we could use that space for storage which is minimum in our 15 ft parkliner

Thanks,
Brenda
First off, Congrats on your Parkliner. If the company would settle down a bit I am still very interested in them and have been since they started.


Your reference to "boon docking" would generally mean you are camped away from actual campgrounds, generally without hookups of any kind. What you are describing would be termed "dry-camping" where you could be at a formal campground but without water/electric services at the site.
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Old 10-25-2018, 08:50 AM   #29
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I couldn't imagine camping without the propane. In our Escape we use propane for:

1) Fridge
2) Hot water heater
3) Furnace
4) Stove/oven
5) BBQ
6) Firebowl

Eliminating propane? I cannot even imagine getting by without!
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Old 10-25-2018, 08:57 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Ice-breaker View Post
I couldn't imagine camping without the propane. In our Escape we use propane for:

1) Fridge
2) Hot water heater
3) Furnace
4) Stove/oven
5) BBQ
6) Firebowl

Eliminating propane? I cannot even imagine getting by without!
I had thought of removing the propane tank from my camper. Only thing in it is a stove top and thought I could use an alcohol stove like what's used on boats to keep things simple (like Origo brand). But, seeing that list, might keep it around as I'd like to add a furnace in the Burro and might come up with other ideas as I fix it up.
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Old 10-25-2018, 10:47 AM   #31
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Not to mention survival use

You don't need to be a prepper to imagine using your RV in case of an emergency or calamity. It is fine to leave some systems dormant. But I wouldn't remove them. In addition to this list, propane would let you boil water in an emergency to purify it. The RV also gives you a way to wash up, and a dry place to sleep.

1) Fridge
2) Hot water heater
3) Furnace
4) Stove/oven
5) BBQ
6) Firebowl

Eliminating propane? I cannot even imagine getting by without!
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Old 10-25-2018, 11:00 AM   #32
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An empty 20 lb. propane tank weighs 17.6 lbs.

Not much in the scheme of things.
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Old 10-25-2018, 12:17 PM   #33
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Name: Michael
Trailer: Currently Shopping
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Removing Propane Tanks

Our first trailer was a completely restored 1974 Bell 16 ft trailer. Because the propane equipment was outdated, combined with many of the reasons cited above for not having propane, we decided to go 100% electric during the rebuild. In November 2016 we (my wife, our cat, and I) were crossing the Cascades in somewhat crappy weather on our way from Washington State to Arizona, when I noticed the outside air temperature gauge on our Toyota FJ Cruiser tow vehicle was showing 5 degrees F. Had the FJ had a problem at that point, we could have been in BIG trouble! A few days later we submitted an order for a new, 19 ft Escape trailer. I suggest you carefully think through when and where you will be traveling before you eliminate your propane tanks.
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Old 11-21-2018, 10:15 AM   #34
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Iím in the process of eliminating our propane tanks and moving the battery to the front on our Casita too. For years weíve traveled thousands of miles and always camp at state parks with electricity and water. I could carry empty propane tanks, but then what would be the purpose? As far as living in a what if world, like being ready for the zombie apocalypse, I donít think so. In case of a disaster, I can always hitch up and move! Iím not staying and risking my life. Besides I like the taste of a fresh sirloin served in a restaurant vs dehydrated steak! We can even stay in a hotel!
We used to ďboondockĒ in our tent, carrying everything we needed in our backpacks. Sometimes hiking for miles before we pitched our tent (weíre retired and still run 5Ks, 10Ks, and half Marathons). We never roughed it with solar panels , hot water heaters, refrigerator, stoves, led lights, full size beds, and heaters. As we got older we wanted amenities. We carry a Harbor Freight Honda knockoff generator we use when ďBoondockingĒ at Walmart or truck stops. We like the purr of our genny when its 110į. We canít even hear it inside over our AC and the Soundbar on or television. We also enjoy the smell of plastic from our Kindle with its 60+ books and led paper white display. We only have to recharge it once a month! We really like the boondocking pictures on the forums or Facebook, from the iPhone Xís or the Samsungís using the Internet! Welcome to the 21st century! You only live once, enjoy it!
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Old 11-21-2018, 10:32 AM   #35
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What are your thoughts about having the trailer for a Plan B, after a Paradise, CA event, or tornado, hurricane, blizzard, or other natural disaster? Zombie apocalypses happen.

There's also resale. I would not consider a trailer with propane removed.

The nice part, is it is your trailer and you are free to decide. Good luck.
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Old 11-21-2018, 11:16 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkyVasquez View Post
Iím in the process of eliminating our propane tanks and moving the battery to the front on our Casita too. For years weíve traveled thousands of miles and always camp at state parks with electricity and water.
Many of the state and national park campgrounds around here have no hookups.

On our recent month long trip to Alaska, we had electricity at most ten days. No hookups at Denali NP, no hookups at Yellowstone (they do have one C/G with power, but its very hard to get a site), no hookups at Yukon Provincial Park, no hookups at the BC provincial park we stayed at, no hookup in nice Wyoming State Park we stayed at, and so on.

Not interested in a debate on this topic, but I use propane to power the refrigerator while I am on the road. 12V would not keep up.

Removing one option to power a camper is something I would never do.
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Old 11-21-2018, 04:27 PM   #37
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Texas
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Removing Propane Tanks

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Originally Posted by Tom 72 View Post
What are your thoughts about having the trailer for a Plan B, after a Paradise, CA event, or tornado, hurricane, blizzard, or other natural disaster? Zombie apocalypses happen.

There's also resale. I would not consider a trailer with propane removed.

The nice part, is it is your trailer and you are free to decide. Good luck.


Well my plan B is if I survived:
CA event - hold my beer while I hitch up and move!
Tornado - hold my Bloody Mary while I hitch up and move!
Hurricane - hold my Wine glass while I hitch up and move!
Any other natural disasters- hold my Jack Danielís while I hitch up and move!
Zombie attack! - die come back as a zombie and join the party forever!!!
Iím not going to stay in a disaster area, eat dry food and drink dehydrated alcohol. Im traveling to a park, hooking up and taking out my television, connecting my cable or satellite. Putting my feet up and enjoying my delivered steak I ordered on the Internet!
As for resale I didnít buy my Casita as an investment. I have a financial advisor and my investments. During the last RV boom fiberglass RVs were expensive. A few years later you could get a used Scamp or Casita for $5,000. Ask me how I know! RV companies were dropping like flies! Most of the fiberglass RV companies today have been closed and reopened. With all the new shows on television and baby boomers retiring, RVs are hot again. People will find out itís not the glorified hotel room where you just go in, drop your suit cases, leave, and when you get back your room is clean. RVs are a lot of work and not everyone who goes out on vacation wants to work. The RV boom will end soon and used RVs be low in price again. Casita just announced yesterday that they have over 6 fully built trailers on the lot if anyone wants one. Not one or two that were canceled, but six! In any model you want! No more waiting a year and a half for one! Hmmm, what does this tell you? [ATTACH]126307
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Old 11-21-2018, 05:27 PM   #38
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Name: K C
Trailer: 1971 Trailswest Campster
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Originally Posted by BrendaG View Post
Has anyone removed the propane tanks and gone total electric for a while? We are not boondockers and feel the two tanks are just added weight ... If we remove them we could use that space for storage which is minimum in our 15 ft parkliner

Thanks,
Brenda
Of course you can do that as long as you still have a way to cook and run your refrigerator and heat water... if those are functions you like having.



The newer all electric models have different appliances than the ones meant to use gas for the fridge and cooking. So eventually if you always want to be all electric you might consider changing your cooktop to an induction unit and your fridge to a 12v/110v unit and your water heater to electric.



But until the time you are ready to optimize your trailer to be efficiently electric you might just want to keep on using the propane for its superior functionality over a making it do conversion. If you are afraid of propane then keep on practicing until you are comfortable using it. I grew up learning to cook on natural gas, our water heater was natural gas as well as the furnace so I guess the fear of it just never took hold of me.
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Old 11-21-2018, 05:39 PM   #39
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Camping is an ill-defined term. It means different things to different people. I suppose an Arab sheikh might consider staying in a 6 star hotel suite as camping out. Not that I know any sheikhs. My daughter lived in a one room shack in the woods near Telluride for a year or so and they went camping (to get away from it all) with a sleeping bag and a small back pack.

What makes sense to some is foolishness to others. There is just no accounting for taste. May we all have what our hearts desire!
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Old 11-21-2018, 06:37 PM   #40
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Removing Propane Tanks

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Originally Posted by k corbin View Post
But until the time you are ready to optimize your trailer to be efficiently electric you might just want to keep on using the propane for its superior functionality over a making it do conversion. If you are afraid of propane then keep on practicing until you are comfortable using it. I grew up learning to cook on natural gas, our water heater was natural gas as well as the furnace so I guess the fear of it just never took hold of me.
You need to go back and reread the post! Itís not about a ďfearĒ of propane!!! Itís about getting campsites with electricity and not using propane!!! I also grew up with natural gas and my home has natural gas. We bought an induction oven for our Casita for only $50 with a stainless pot and pan. It will boil water in less than 30 seconds! We also travel with a generator for quick stops. We can also boil water in our microwave faster than any gas stove! Our refrigerator has 12V operation and our water heater has the 120 VAC option. We have never had any use for propane. Besides I bet I can get more for an all electric Casita than a propane one! There arenít any!
We still have the original propane bottles on our 2001 and they are still full! Iíve tried using propane on our air conditioner when it was 110į, but it wouldnít cool. I also got tired of fanning myself with the solar panels. So I turned on the generator! If anything they should ban the new Coleman air conditioner on Casitas that sounds louder than a 747 taking off! The new Colemanís are not as loud, itís down to about an F-16 fighter jet!
I know generators are frowned upon, especially by those driving clanking diesels for hours getting to the campsite. Then driving in at night with their 1 million candlepower headlights and fog lights on with their clanking diesels. Backing up with their lights on, illuminating all the RVs in the campgrounds to the point that you need to put in SPF 50 lotion so you donít get sunburned! Waking up hibernating bears in the next county! Then complain about the tiny little yellow led porch light on that RV! Oh well! Godspeed!
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