reposting generator mod - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-09-2006, 05:32 PM   #1
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Probably have seen this before but I haven't been on for a while so here is a dual Honda 2000 generator hookup with a 30 amp rv plug that I use with a 7 gallon marine tank.
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Old 03-10-2006, 12:37 PM   #2
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Presumably these are hooked up electrically in parallel, to give 110 VAC, but at the amperage of both generating units.

I was just wondering how these actually operate as a light load is applied, then as the load is slowly increased?

Does each unit share the load approximately equally from light to heavy load?

Or does one unit dominate, i.e., take all or most of the load until some point where it can't handle more, then the secondary unit begins to take on the increasing load up to its rating?

I don't have a need to know. Just wondering.
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Old 03-10-2006, 08:07 PM   #3
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Quote:
Presumably these are hooked up electrically in parallel, to give 110 VAC, but at the amperage of both generating units.

I was just wondering how these actually operate as a light load is applied, then as the load is slowly increased?

Does each unit share the load approximately equally from light to heavy load?

Or does one unit dominate, i.e., take all or most of the load until some point where it can't handle more, then the secondary unit begins to take on the increasing load up to its rating?

I don't have a need to know. Just wondering.
Hello Loren- You are correct that they are hooked together and they actually "sync" up automatically as the are technically inverters and not generators. Yes each unit shares the load equally no matter what load type is applied. I went this route instead of the Honda 3000 for a few different reasons. Weight and bulkiness of the 3000 for one. Secondly different times of the year I don't need both to do my camping as one unit will actually run most everything in my camper. Even during the hot season I can run my air conditioning as I have removed my original 13,500 btu rated @ 15.5 amps and replaced it with a high efficiency 13,500 btu rated @ only 10.5 amps. Therefore I can run the A/C and still have plenty of amps left for other things such as television, coffee pot, and other necessities. (Necessities for me, anyhow).
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Old 03-11-2006, 09:22 AM   #4
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Your picture shows them hooked up outside to what appears similar to a campground power outlet setup. Is this the way you normally use them?

Where do you you carry them? On your trailer tongue? In your tow vehicle?

How do you provide security for them?

Note: I still have a 3000 watt Honda that I used during one of my other lives as a market produce farmer. It was used to power a Coleman rooftop A/C that was modified to operate as a cooler for an insulated cargo delivery trailer. It was mounted on the tongue.

I would start it as soon as the day began to warm, about 8 AM, and it would run all day on a filling of gas unless the weather was abnormally warm. Kept the trailer about 45 deg. F., which was about right for fresh produce. The Honda is a good unit, has an auto-idle function, so it will only rev up when the A/C unit cycles on.

I wasn't aware at the time I bought the 3000 watt unit that there was an option of running two smaller units in parallel. Maybe they weren't available then.
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Old 03-11-2006, 04:38 PM   #5
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Yes, the way you see them set up is the way I use them when using both. The back of my truck is covered and lockable as far as security and this is where they are during transport also. The Honda 3000 is an excellent choice also but it cost almost exactly the same as two of the 2000's therefore allowing me to pick up an extra 1000 watts of power for the same money. Honda and other generator manufacturers now sell a 30 amp plug kit for the exact purpose of running these together but most I have seen are well over $200 and more. The pictured electrical box with the 30 amp rv plug under the lid and the support post cost me about $75.00 to fabricate myself.
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Old 03-11-2006, 09:07 PM   #6
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I'm surprised that the two inverters, which are generally used in isolation, successfully synch to each other by simply connecting the outputs in parallel. Is there something more in the usual parallel operation kits that is not needed with the current inverter models (to control traditional generators), or is there some reason that this simple parallel connection is not ideal? In the Honda U.S. generator page, the video describes the connection simply as a "cable", rather than a more sophisticated device, so it sounds like wiring both to one receptacle should be fine.

I can't find the post right now (maybe we lost it to the hack), but I recall from a previous discussion that the generators sold in Canada (EU2000iC instead of EU2000i) handle the grounding differently, and as a result cannot be connected in parallel this way. Maybe someone remembers the details.
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Old 03-12-2006, 05:50 AM   #7
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Hello Brian,
You are correct about the Canadian models not being able to do this. Also these inverters are the only models (EU series) that the dual hook-up can be done with as you can not and should not try this with a regular generator. This is basically a duplicate of the Honda parallel cable system the only difference being the Honda system uses three wires individually and my set-up uses the same three wires sheathed together in a 10/3 cord. As far as grounding.... unless one takes an 8' copper grounding pole and hammers it into the earth at every campsite they go to (other than campground provided power) it is virtually impossible to ground a self contained generator of any type. Next time boondocking using a generator take a receptacle tester and see if it gives you an "open ground" error code. (Although this could be a discussion for another thread)
As far as this set-up being less than ideal, it has been used successfully by myself for 4 years and by many others for longer than that and I don't think Honda would advertise and sell a parallel cable kit for this application if the inverters weren't meant for such a thing.
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Old 03-12-2006, 07:57 PM   #8
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Chuck, for the U.S. inverter models since the Honda setup is simply parallel cabling that's good enough for me I was just wondering if I was missing something about the connection method, but apparently not. Your cable and receptacle setup looks good, especially for providing an RV-style connection rather than the different style of receptacle which is built into the units.
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Old 03-13-2006, 03:15 PM   #9
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Hey Brian,
You aren't missing anything, what you think is how it is.. I have enclosed a pic below showing what is under the electrical box cover. If you go this route just make sure you get an outdoor weathertight box as seen here. They can be found at the big camping outlets for around $50.00 USD or maybe even cheaper at an electrical supply store. Any how my factory pull out camper cord and plug attach directly to this outlet.. no adapters or anything else. Just plug in, fire up the inverters and you're ready to go.
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