Restoring the "Haunted Mansion" - Page 7 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-18-2015, 12:06 AM   #85
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
Posts: 286
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I've always been one of those people who've been motivated by a deadline - probably comes from my training in newspapers and magazines. And the Mansion is no different. With the school year winding down, we need to get the trailer into the paint shop at the technical college - it's supposed to be a learning experience for the students in the auto collision/refinishing department! After all, how many fiberglass trailers will they paint in their lifetimes?

Knowing that a deadline is coming, but not knowing a firm date, we paid a visit to Pickens Tech to talk to our wonderful mentor there to get some last minute advice on finishing up the body work on the trailer, set a date for painting, and...probably most important - pick out the paint colors!

Now we've been thinking about the decorations and colors ever since the very beginning -- after all, if you were going to give a trailer the moniker of "The Haunted Mansion," you better back it up with at least a little theming, right? We KNEW that it wasn't going to be your standard white Scamp trailer - where would the fun be in that? So, since we are decorating the trailer after our favorite ride at Disney - the Haunted Mansion - we thought we'd draw inspiration for the colors from the Disney palette (pictured below).

With the palette as our guide, we've been keeping our eyes open for things that would be suitable for decorating the trailer. One of the first things we picked out (totally just happened across it at the fabric store), was a wonderful upholstery pattern for the cushions that featured black and purple (and shown below).

We realized that the trailer is small enough, and the darker colors may make it seem even smaller, but we figured we'd offset it with the color of the walls and the cabinets. Picking up the beige color from the palette, we plan to paint our cabinets an off-white or almond color. As for the walls, we've opted not to go with the standard "rat fur" from Scamp - neither one of us liked the texture/feel of it...so instead, we'll be going with an automotive headliner fabric (desert tan).

Now back to our visit to Pickens. We wanted to continue the palette on the outside of the trailer. We looked at tons of different paint schemes on the Internet and found we really liked the one with a dark color (purple) on the bottom half of the trailer and a lighter color (tan/gold) on top. When I initially approached Pickens Tech about painting the trailer telling them our plan, we were taken back to the paint shop and presented with the "wall of paint" - actually, it was a small cabinet about 3 feet long and 2 feet high -- filled with small books containing just about every color in the visible spectrum. When we said we wanted a "purple," they asked, "Which one?" and showed us a book containing nothing but variations on a purple ranging from a light lilac to one that looked almost black. For the gold, the options almost doubled...at which point, my eyes started to glaze over. The instructor suggested that perhaps I should leave the paint choice up to Myka. Good idea!

Going through the thousands of samples would have been a daunting task, but it wasn't nearly as difficult as it could have been. Myka knew exactly what she wanted and went right for it! Within 10 minutes, she found the perfect colors -- she picked out an "aubergine" (it looked like a dark purple for us plebians) for the bottom half, and a "desert sand mica" (how appropriate!) which is a gold-ish color for the top half. Below are close representations of the colors. Both will have a metal flake in them.

The cool thing about the colors is that if you look at them directly, the colors will come out exactly as described -- purple and gold. However, if you look at them from an angle, the colors change -- the purple goes almost black and the gold turns a platinum color. It's gonna look great!

One of the first things on the last-minute to-do list was to order the gravel shield from Scamp. We were thinking we could just wing it an make one from scratch, but after reading on the forums about how others have done it, it sure seemed like a better idea just to bite the bullet and buy one. So we did - along with the right size plexiglass for the front window.

The blue thing in the pic above is the plexiglass still encased in its protective cover. The rock shield came without the Scamp logo (YEA!), so all we have to do is remove the protective edging and sand down the gelcoat so it can receive paint just like the rest of the trailer. We'll paint it the dark purple to match the bottom of the trailer. Why? Because we've got a really cool idea to put a vinyl graphic on it....and the graphic would be white, which wouldn't show up on the gold color...

Probably the most important piece we need to finish is the door. We have already taken care of the exterior piece, but the interior was still a mess. Well, not a mess, just unfinished.

The frame was solid - the conduit pipe worked out great, and the wood frame pieces will support the lock and the window well. But what about the rest? Well, that's where the foam comes in. Using a piece of inexpensive 3/4" insulating foam with foil on one side from Home Depot, we cut pieces to fill in the voids in the door. For the big piece at the bottom, the foam was flexible enough to bend to fit the curve of the door, so we didn't have to make any kerf cuts in the insulation's foil side! YEA! Then, using a generous amount of spray adhesive, we coated both the door and the foam and pressed them into place.

The next step was to resin the door. Initially, we had planned on using fiberglass mat right over the top of the framing and foam - the mat is much thicker than the regular fiberglass cloth. A couple of drawbacks, though - first, it would require a LOT of resin to soak the mat and second, we were concerned that the resin placed directly on the foam would result in the foam's melting down. We decided that it would probably be best to put a barrier between the foam and the resin...should we use some sort of wood panel? Plastic? Those would add a ton of weight to the door -- which we've worked really hard to get rid of...so what to use?

And that's when it came to me...I remembered the project I had worked on with our son --he made a Star Wars costume helmet using nothing but paper, bondo and fiberglass. I wondered if we could use cardboard...after all, we'd fiberglass over it anyway providing rigidity, and the whole inside of the door would eventually be covered with headliner fabric, so no one would ever see it.... Hmmm.

You know, the Internet is a wonderful place. We read a few articles, surfed a few pages, looked at a few forum posts. We found out that there are folks out there that actually build custom bodies for cars that start out using cardboard as their base and then apply fiberglass over it. If they could do it, then why couldn't we?

We have tons of cardboard around to use as templates and such for the interior so we picked out a fairly substantial piece - part of a box from a large screen TV - which was thicker than your average run-of-the-mill cardboard box. It seemed like a perfect choice to use as a substrate for the fiberglass. Using a utility blade, we cut out the shape around the inside raised portion of the door, and using more of the spray adhesive, we glued our cardboard into place.
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:10 AM   #86
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
Posts: 286
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Now it was time to get down to some serious business - fiberglassing. We cut strips of fiberglass cloth to go around the edges first. Pay no mind to the gallon bucket on the door in the pictures below...it was just being used as a weight to hold the cardboard down while the adhesive set. The same is true for the 2x2 held down by the clamps. We wanted to ensure a good bond between cardboard and door.

Then, in small batches, we began the application of the resin until we had completely glassed in the edge of the door.

With the edge secured, it was time to let the resin cure overnight. We'll apply resin and glass cloth to the rest of the door and around the window next time!
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:17 AM   #87
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
Posts: 286
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Well, the last few workdays were truly those kinds of days when there was lot of activity on the trailer, but none of it seemed connected. Truly, it was a smorgasbord of things to be done.

First up was the door. We continued the work we started and completely fiberglassed the interior surface. Once we had it all coated in resin and glass, there wasn't much more we could do on it, so we set it aside to cure. The goal was to get it to the point where we could mount it back on the trailer - it had to be that way so it could be painted.

Once the fiberglass hardened, it was time to rehang the door. We repaired the hinge holes on the door since the original holes allowed the door to hang crookedly in the doorway. After placing the door as squarely in the opening as possible, we redrilled the holes and replaced the bolts with some new hardware. We'll probably remove the door once it gets painted so we can install the butyl tape under the hinges to prevent any possible chance of leaks...but we had to put the door in so the crew at Pickens can paint it.

The door still didn't fit as nicely as we would like. It was still a little out of square with the frame. So, we decided it was time to fix that. We added a bit of fiberglass on the outer edge on the lower left side of the door to bring the door closer to square. We'll have to trim off the top left and lower right corners of the door. That will be easy. Taking off material is easy. Adding it is the hard part.

Using file folders to give us a base upon which to build, we layered fiberglass inside and out. It'll need some more work than this, but at least it's a start. And the door will actually look like it fits properly now. It really wasn't a problem for the seal of the door before...it just LOOKED crooked. And that bothered us. So we fixed it.

We also had to deal with the old rivet holes that held the metal bar on the hinge side of the door and the closet cabinet on the latch side. We didn't want to invite trouble with leaks by letting them go, so we used the Dremel, ground out the gelcoat to the glass and then fiberglassed the inside and put bondo on the outside.
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:28 AM   #88
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
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And while that was drying, we took to finish up the framing on the dinette. We needed to add supports for the "hatch" openings in the seat. We opted to keep it simple and go with a recessed panel instead of a hinged lid - after all it's better to keep it simple. The original fiberglass benches had recessed panels, so we figured that was good enough for the rebuild. It would also be a lot less hassle since we wouldn't have to install hinges. The water tank, pictured in the lower right corner of the picture below can fit through the opening, should we ever need to take it out.

As we mentioned before, the tabs that Scamp installed along the walls to support the bench seats were not installed at equal heights. The tabs on the driver's side were 3/4" lower than the ones on the driver's side. In the photo above, you can see the gap just below the 2x2 frame. A simple shim of scrap 3/4" plywood solved the problem.

We placed a diagonal brace to provide support to the corners of the dinette. We also installed a frame on the back bench, too, so we could have access to storage there. The plan is to put the water pump in there so access would be necessary.

Once that was done, it was time to move on to the pantry/closet by the door. The first thing we did was create the face frame for the cupboard. In the photos below, you can see the frame. This was our first time using pocket screws...and boy was it easy using the newly acquired jig! We love new tools! The frame is made of 3/4" pine that we scored from the culled lumber rack at Home Depot (hence the splotches of purple paint). The lumber was fairly straight...it wasn't twisted, just slightly bowed -- which would be easily fixed when we made the cabinet.

Using scrap 3/4" plywood, we added a "floor" to the cupboard too - one that wrapped around the wheel well. The first picture below shows the forward side of the cupboard, the second one, the rearward side.

Once the frame was all put together, we took it inside the trailer and squared it up to the floor. We then used our trusty cardboard template we created to make the struts that have been glued to side of the trailer.

Using the same template, with a few additional pieces, we created the shape for the rearward side of the cabinet, and transferred the shape to the sanded plywood.
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Old 04-18-2015, 12:35 AM   #89
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
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A test fit of the wood for the rearward side of the cabinet was successful -- we just needed to do a little sanding along the back edge and we had a good,tight fit.

Once both sides were cut, it was time to glue and staple them to the face frame using some wood glue and our trusty air nailer. Then it was back to the interior for another test fit. We'll need to do some sanding and filling in some of the imperfections/nail holes in the face frame but overall, it looks great.

We also needed to do a little more work on the door side of the lock to accommodate the strike plate. When we glassed the inside of the door, we put down the cardboard over every place but the lock catch area, so it wasn't quite thick enough for the strike plate. We took care of that.

The next part, now that we had the cupboard in and the lock in the door, was to create the receiving strike plate. Using a scrap of 1/2" ply, we cut a semi circle and notched out where the latch and the deadbolt are supposed to go. Works great. And we'll sand down the edges and paint it when we paint he rest of the cupboard.

Initially, we thought about making our own gravel shield for the front window, but decided against that. We bit the bullet and ordered one from Scamp. In order to get it painted, we needed to sand down the gelcoat. The shield came with the molding around the edge, so we first had to drill out the two rivets holding the molding on. Once done, the molding just slipped right off. We then sanded the gelcoat with some 220 grit sandpaper and viola! The gravel shield is ready for paint!

Only a few more days and we'll have our trailer in paint! Can't wait!
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:10 PM   #90
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
Posts: 286
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Well, it seems like it's been a long road getting to this point - but we're almost there! We're almost ready to paint the Mansion! But there's still a couple things to take care of.

The Door. Oh, yes, The Door. This has been a problem since the very beginning. We've worked out most of the problems -- we fixed the weight, fixed the curve (for the most part), fixed the latch, fixed the hinge holes...but the darn thing still didn't sit quite right in the door frame. And part of that isn't the door's fault; it's the door frame. It's nothing that would keep it from functioning correctly, but it just didn't LOOK right.

So, as we posted previously, we decided to actually shape the door to make it look right. That required adding a little bit to the lower right side (latch side) of the door, and take off a bit on the lower right (hinge side) and on the top left (latch side). In the photos below, you can see how much we needed to take off the top left and add to the bottom left. THIS is the last we need to take care of before we send the trailer into the paint shop.

We tried to sand the door while still attached to the trailer, but it was too cumbersome. So we took it off and put it up on the saw horses for sanding. The pic below shows the door after we took down the bulk of the fiberglass. The addition we put on the door is kinda visible about 6"-8" up from the bottom.

The next part was to smooth out the glass and feather it out. Out came the Bondo. (You know, for as much Bondo as we felt we used, we have only used about 3/4 of a quart can...and a good amount of that was sanded off!) The door is a little thicker near the bottom, but that's OK. There is still a slight gap on that corner anyway but nothing the rubber seal won't fix.

We put the one cabinet by the door back into the trailer so that the door would latch and we wouldn't have to come up with some way to secure the door while the trailer was in transit. We were concerned about the new latch and this would be a good test to see if it held the door shut while the trailer was in motion. We recently saw a post on one of the forums that Scamp owners were having trouble keeping their doors closed with the original locks...we certainly hoped we had fixed that with the new lock. (And SPOILER -- we did!)

Then the trick came in rehanging the door by myself. That was fun. Not. But with a little struggle, I finally got it. And the effort of taking it off and adjusting the "square" of the door was worth it. In the photos below, you can see how even it looks now.

And THAT, as they say, is THAT! We are done with the body work! YEA! And there is much rejoicing!

The task now is to get the trailer to Pickens so they can paint it. This is the first time the trailer has been out of the garage in one piece since we put it in there. As we pulled it out, the trailer cleared the door with ease thanks to the small "storage wheels" we put on it! It looked like a bug emerging from a cocoon as we pulled it out into the night...
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:15 PM   #91
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
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The driveway slopes away from the house to the street, so we just manhandled the trailer down to where it was level. There we swapped the tires back to the sporty aluminum wheels that came with it, and hitched it up to the Doombuggy.

And that's an interesting little aside... We HAD a 2004 Honda Pilot with 250,000 miles on it...but after a visit to the dealership to diagnose a check engine light, we discovered that the poor thing had a laundry list of things that needed to be replaced -- totaling a whopping $12,500! We knew we were going to have to get a new tow vehicle in the near future, but we didn't think it was THAT near in the future! So the Doombuggy II (the original Doombuggy was a 2004 Honda Odyssey that was destroyed in a hail storm) was traded in for a 2012 Honda Pilot which is now Doombuggy III. Not only will we get a "new" trailer, but also a new tow vehicle as well!

Anyway, we got the trailer all hooked up, ran some temporary lights through the shell, attached the license plate temporarily using a couple of clamps, and called it a day.

In the morning, we made a quick pitstop at Walmart to do some shopping on our way into the tech college and while we were there, we took advantage of the space and the light to get some good pics. The Mansion looks pretty dilapidated, missing all its windows and filled with all manner of holes and all, to say the least, but to us it looks great!

The old Pilot's hitch was a little lower than the on on Doombuggy III...so we'll have to get a drop down insert to get that hitch level; right now it's pitching upward a little bit. Even so, the trailer tows really well...though it still bounces around, which is to be expected...there's hardly anything inside. Photos and shopping done, we were off to Pickens where they were waiting for us!

The auto collision instructor, Anthony Larson, and his students met us at the door and helped us wheel the Mansion into one of their paint booths. The students were fascinated with the little guy...having not seen one before.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:19 PM   #92
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
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Once in, we got some final pictures of the trailer in it's all its original white glory. The next time it hits the road will be with a fresh coat of paint!

One interesting discovery: Once the Mansion was inside the paint booth, their lighting, which is much better than the cheap flourescent lights in my garage, revealed something we had not seen before. In the photo below, which we increased the contrast, you can see the ghosts of four distinct letters just above the belly band: USMC. That confirms what we thought based on the research we did early on. The trailer had a sticker on the front from MCAS El Toro (a Marine Corps Air Station - now closed - in California), a Marines sticker on the rear bumper, and the number 4 on the right front and left rear corners.... This was definitely a rental unit for servicemen out in California. Not that it matters now, but it is still a cool find that reveals a little more of the history of our Mansion. Ooh-rah!

Well, now that the Mansion has been delivered, it's time to head home and clean up the garage and await the call from Anthony to let us know that they are getting ready to paint...I asked him to give me a call when they started so I could come take some pictures! We can't wait to see what the trailer will look like when they get through!
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Old 04-24-2015, 07:47 PM   #93
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
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Well, we have turned a corner and the Mansion has a new look: a fresh coat of gray primer! Next up, the guys are going to put on a "marking" coat (whatever that is), then a sealer, then color then a clear coat. We are getting excited! In the photos, you can see Anthony Larson, the auto collision instructor who is in charge of getting the Mansion painted. In the photos, you can see the rock shield and the door which were removed for painting.

BTW...we talked with the executive director of Pickens Tech, who happens to own a canned ham trailer that's been glammed up in a cowgirl motif, who asked if we would be willing to bring the trailer back to the school's open house to show off what their students can do! We would gladly do that!
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Old 04-24-2015, 09:13 PM   #94
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Name: kootenai girl
Trailer: 2004 Casita Liberty 17
British Columbia
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The suspense is building.
I can't wait to see it with the new colours. From looking at the samples its going to look great and so unique.
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Old 04-25-2015, 08:07 AM   #95
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Name: Joe
Trailer: 1999 Casita 17' SD
Ohio
Posts: 552
Tony
You remind me of myself and my many and varied "projects" over the years.
I'm no longer as ambitious as I was 40 years ago but still enjoy keeping our 1999 17' Casita SD looking good and hopefully keeping it from getting into the shape your Scamp was in.
I've your read every word and looked at every picture. Your an inspiration!
The only thing I would have done differently, no criticism intended, would have been a continuous conduit door frame welded at the joints. But that's just me.

Keep the pictures and updates coming!

Joe
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Old 04-25-2015, 12:25 PM   #96
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Name: Tony
Trailer: Scamp - The Haunted Mansion
Colorado
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Joe -- I thought about that but it didn't seem necessary. And honestly, its pretty darn solid...and lightweight, considering. I think it'll be fine. If I had the skills, tools and the $$, I would've done an aluminum tube frame...but overall, I think it turned out pretty well.

Thanks for the encouragement!
- Tony
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Old 04-29-2015, 11:47 PM   #97
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We are so excited! We got a late-afternoon email on Tuesday alerting us that the Mansion had gotten it's first coat of color! So we made a stop at Pickens Tech this morning to snag some pics!

The color that Myka picked out is one that is used by Honda on some of it's cars - it's an Aubergine - a really deep purple - the color of an egg plant. When we first saw the trailer this morning, the color looked almost black and I was concerned that it was too dark. But was I in for a wonderful surprise!

In the photos below, you can see the door. The top half will be painted the same color as the top half of the trailer - which will be a champagne-like gold - but for now, only the bottom has the glossy color. The top half still shows the "marking coat" (which I'm still not clear what the "marking coat" is for...)...which is a dull black coat.

The surprise came when we took the rock shield, which is painted the same color as the bottom half of the trailer so it will contrast with the top color, out into the sunlight where the almost-black color turned into the a brilliant purple! The pearl and metallic flakes really make it pop! If all goes according to plan, the gold color on top should be done next week! We can't wait!
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Old 04-30-2015, 12:58 AM   #98
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Trailer: Casita SD17 2006
California
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Wow, sunlight really makes it pop! Looking good. Back in the late 80's I was at a large car show in San Diego and was on my way out after a long day. Was walking by one car that stopped me in my tracks because of the paint and hidden flames that popped when the sunlight was just right. Found the owner and talked about the paint job.....the paint was $1500.00 a gal . I made a special trip back the next day to take pics.
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