Rewiring - input please! - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-08-2013, 02:04 PM   #15
Raz
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Does anyone know why the fuse in both the battery line, and then again just inside the scamp on the same line? This seems redundant. What am I missing?


It's nice to have a fuse at the battery in case the charge line shorts. It also makes a convenient disconnect.

If you have any interest in a replacement fridge, this one is down to $200 and might be in your neighborhood. Raz

http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...tor-60389.html
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Old 09-08-2013, 02:08 PM   #16
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Service....

There is usually 20 and 30 amp AC service for 95% of all RV's. Much bigger Class "A" behemoths may have a 50 amp service line. That figure is for 120VAC.

12 volt amperage is divided by 10 to get equal 120 volt load. i.e, a 45 amp converter, running with maximum load (not very common, if even possible) would draw but 4.5 amps from the 120 power line.

30 amp service is more than enought to run the converter and an AC unit and a microwave all at the same time.





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Originally Posted by DaMScampers View Post
Steve, that is great input! With all that being the case:

1. How does one prewire for Solar?
2. Is 30amps limiting in regards to anything you have said?
3. Right now, with an adapter I can safely plug into my normal garage outlet (nothing on in the scamp other than lights). Can one do the same with 45 amp service?
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Old 09-08-2013, 03:19 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
The cost is an issue, but so are the fit of the wire into terminations, the flexibility of the wire for installation, the space taken by wiring, the weight of all the wire in the trailer, and the sheer waste of resources that results from putting in twice as much copper as appropriate. Bigger is not better without limit; if you had 0-gauge battery cable available, would you really use it to run a 5 watt light bulb?

Geeesh....
I think that the discussion was about 10 ga. vs 12 ga. or 14 ga. wire, any of which are adequate for MOST 12 VDC loads.

About the only issue I see is that it is a PITA to get good crimp-on terminals for larger wire and they do cost a bit more. But weight, space consumption and wire bending ability might be critical in building a Mars Rover, but, perhaps not so much so in a FGRV.

Personally, I shop for my wire stock at the local Swap Meet and Garage sales, buy end rolls that are 14 ga. or bigger, and use what's on hand when I run wires. If my black stock happens to be 12 ga and I am wiring an LED porch light, so be it.....

And, as far as conserving resources..... How many out there are using F-150's to tow a 13' Scamp?????
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Old 09-08-2013, 03:59 PM   #18
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I think that the discussion was about 10 ga. vs 12 ga. or 14 ga. wire, any of which are adequate for MOST 12 VDC loads.
Okay, valid point, but why stop at 10 gauge? If David had asked "8,10,12,14?" would we be telling him to wire the whole trailer in 8-gauge? Someone wiring their basement might list common household wiring gauges - 12, 14 - and I hope people wouldn't tell him to wire the entire house in 12 gauge.

16 gauge is more than adequate for most 12 VDC loads, if we're picking wire size without considering the load. Take a look at the wiring in the tug: there's not likely much wire that's even as large as 14 gauge in there.

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But weight, space consumption and wire bending ability might be critical in building a Mars Rover, but, perhaps not so much so in a FGRV.
It's good that your trailer has no wiring in cramped spaces, Bob.

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And, as far as conserving resources..... How many out there are using F-150's to tow a 13' Scamp?????
Lots. And lots of members are not willing to do that. It's a good thing not everyone on the planet hogs resources the way many of us do.
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Old 09-08-2013, 04:10 PM   #19
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There is usually 20 and 30 amp AC service for 95% of all RV's. Much bigger Class "A" behemoths may have a 50 amp service line
...
30 amp service is more than enought to run the converter and an AC unit and a microwave all at the same time.
50-amp service may be much more common than you think - it is very common on Class A motorhomes, larger Class C motorhomes, and large travel trailers... essentially anything that might have two air conditioners, or one high-capacity air conditioner plus the ability to run something like a microwave and anything else at the same time.

I agree that with a single air conditioner of moderate size and the appliances typical of a small travel trailer, no more than 30 amp AC service would be required or appropriate.

David - do you have the distinction between 120V AC current and 12V DC current clear now?
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Old 09-08-2013, 04:35 PM   #20
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The cost is an issue, but so are the fit of the wire into terminations, the flexibility of the wire for installation, the space taken by wiring, the weight of all the wire in the trailer, and the sheer waste of resources that results from putting in twice as much copper as appropriate. Bigger is not better without limit; if you had 0-gauge battery cable available, would you really use it to run a 5 watt light bulb?
I agree with you ab the nonsense huge gauge of wire for conducting electrial current unnecessary to the load and my implication lies within reasonable size from the poster's range. Regarding to the huge gauge of wire available for battery to run a 5 watts light bulb, my answer is...YES and why not if cost and weight are not put into account. That's why THE FRAME IS USED AS NEGATIVE PORTION OF BATTERY ELECTRICAL CIRCUITRY.... Just my thought...
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Old 09-08-2013, 05:04 PM   #21
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That's why THE FRAME IS USED AS NEGATIVE PORTION OF BATTERY ELECTRICAL CIRCUITRY.... Just my thought...
As I have learned from many years of working on and rewiring FGRV's, frame ground is just a cheap way to provide a poor ground. I have lost count of the number of electrical problems were traced to the frame ground connections.

I always run both a hot and a ground lead to everything I wire, and have a common ground buss near the battery and/or the negative side of the converter. But I guess I will just have to live with all that extra weight.
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Old 09-08-2013, 05:28 PM   #22
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That's why THE FRAME IS USED AS NEGATIVE PORTION OF BATTERY ELECTRICAL CIRCUITRY...
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Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
As I have learned from many years of working on and rewiring FGRV's, frame ground is just a cheap way to provide a poor ground. I have lost count of the number of electrical problems were traced to the frame ground connections.

I always run both a hot and a ground lead to everything I wire, and have a common ground buss near the battery and/or the negative side of the converter. But I guess I will just have to live with all that extra weight.
Now I get to completely agree with Bob!
Wire for the negative side isn't pointless extra material, because it is performing a useful function. In a non-metal structure (such as our eggs, but even stick-built RV bodies), a significant length of wire is needed for the negative side anyway (to reach the frame from the light or appliance) so going through the frame just reduces the wire length somewhat at the expense of adding problems.
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Old 09-09-2013, 06:54 PM   #23
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First, I'd suggest installing a 12v fuse panel with separate fuses and wire to your furnace, water pump, refrigerator (if 12v), inverter (if you build one in . . . I did, a 150w unit with a shore power/inverter crossover switch, and love it), 12v sockets, and lights. It makes trouble shooting easier on down the road.

As for wire gauge, I'd go with 10g or even 8g from your battery to the fuse panel, same gauge as the mains for your inverter, then 12g to everything else.
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Old 09-09-2013, 07:28 PM   #24
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...When one using frame as actually negative branch of battery circuitry, he/she should treat it as an actual conductor, not a dumping ground for complicated negative wirings, then everything would be OK, in my opinion...Thinking and talking is also different. Practice and reality is another story. I am not an electrical expert as said thousands of times but in reality I did all my wirings, including frame as negative branch with no problem, whatsoever so far. Now, let's take a look about my practice:....
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