TireTraker Tire Monitoring System – Review - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-06-2011, 10:27 PM   #1
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TireTraker Tire Monitoring System – Review

Ever since we had the tire blow-out on our TT we have been leery of RV tires. Since our vehicles have TPMS we thought it best to get something. We found the TireTraker and it’s perfect for our needs. We we’re luck and got it on sale for $239.00. A small price to pay for piece of mind and quite honestly the repair of bill would be way higher..

So, here’s our quick review: RV Travel TV » TireTraker Tire Monitoring System – Review
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Old 06-07-2011, 12:19 PM   #2
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TireTraker TPMS
The TireTraker™ TT-400C is a full-time wireless electronic tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) designed to monitor and display tire pressures from 0 psi up to 145 psi, and also to monitor tire temperatures from 14°F to 185°F. The system is capable of displaying current tire pressure and temperature. In addition to your RV, your trailer and tow vehicles can also be monitored, as the system is capable of monitoring up to 22 tires. Low pressure is the leading cause of premature tire failure and the
The TireTraker™ TT-400C consists of two basic components: Tire Sensors/Transmitters, which screw onto the valve stems of tires, and a Monitor/Receiver. Sensors transmit a coded RF signal and alert if pressure drops, pressure increases or temperature increases. The Monitor displays each tire's pressure and temperature per tire position and will display an audible and visual alert if tire pressure or temperature changes.
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Old 06-07-2011, 02:18 PM   #3
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I ordered it for the piece of mind.

Check their site for sale prices.
https://www.tiretraker.com/products.asp?cat=9
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Old 06-08-2011, 12:50 AM   #4
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Attachment 36706
TireTraker TPMS
The TireTraker™ TT-400C is a full-time wireless electronic tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) designed to monitor and display tire pressures from 0 psi up to 145 psi, and also to monitor tire temperatures from 14°F to 185°F. The system is capable of displaying current tire pressure and temperature. In addition to your RV, your trailer and tow vehicles can also be monitored, as the system is capable of monitoring up to 22 tires. Low pressure is the leading cause of premature tire failure and the
The TireTraker™ TT-400C consists of two basic components: Tire Sensors/Transmitters, which screw onto the valve stems of tires, and a Monitor/Receiver. Sensors transmit a coded RF signal and alert if pressure drops, pressure increases or temperature increases. The Monitor displays each tire's pressure and temperature per tire position and will display an audible and visual alert if tire pressure or temperature changes.
"which screw onto the valve stems of tires" thereby increasing the possibility of air leak. Thus will provide proof that they work and tell you when the tire went down caused by very poor pneumatic designed seal.

OK, that's my 2 cents worth.

Study the pneumatic sealing properties, such as what happens when the end of the valve stem get a bit rough, or the sensors aren't screwed to the right torque, the fact the design has air pressure blowing the seal apart instead of creating a tighter seal like the tire bead and the schrader valve provide.

No thanks.
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Old 06-08-2011, 01:14 AM   #5
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"which screw onto the valve stems of tires" thereby increasing the possibility of air leak. Thus will provide proof that they work and tell you when the tire went down caused by very poor pneumatic designed seal.

OK, that's my 2 cents worth.

Study the pneumatic sealing properties, such as what happens when the end of the valve stem get a bit rough, or the sensors aren't screwed to the right torque, the fact the design has air pressure blowing the seal apart instead of creating a tighter seal like the tire bead and the schrader valve provide.

No thanks.

To me, a second consideration would be the need to re-balance the tire/wheel combination after installing this thingy on a valve stem.

AND: Valve stems aren't all THAT strong - the effects of this thing on the valve-stem itself at highway speeds could also give one pause.

Just my $0.02 worth as well ......
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Old 06-08-2011, 02:06 AM   #6
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I have a different brand but have gone from Ohio to the west coast and back with no leaks.
Also I had all steel short valve stems installed and the tires balanced.

Works for me.

Bill K
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Old 06-08-2011, 05:24 PM   #7
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The TireTraker™ TT-400C consists of two basic components: Tire Sensors/Transmitters, which screw onto the valve stems of tires, and a Monitor/Receiver. Sensors transmit a coded RF signal and alert if pressure drops, pressure increases or temperature increases. The Monitor displays each tire's pressure and temperature per tire position and will display an audible and visual alert if tire pressure or temperature changes.
I don't see how monitoring the temperature at the valve stem provides any meaningful information. The temperature of the tire would be meaningful, but not the valve stem.
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Old 06-08-2011, 07:19 PM   #8
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They are connected and as the tire get hotter the valve stem gets hotter.

I have balanced out my side to side weight to even out the temps.

It is much easier to do after dark. LOL

Bill K


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I don't see how monitoring the temperature at the valve stem provides any meaningful information. The temperature of the tire would be meaningful, but not the valve stem.
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Old 06-09-2011, 10:14 AM   #9
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I've used those screw on pressure caps that have the green, yellow and red indicators on 3 vehicles for years and have had no problems at all. The tires lose about 1lb of air a year and when the yellow flag shows, I check and add air.

I Will be using the new electronic ones on a 6 thousand mile trip and will give an update upon return.

Should they cause the tire to lose air, I will be notified at once.
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Old 06-09-2011, 12:41 PM   #10
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I emailed the concerns and received the following is a reply from Progressive Industries Electrical Protection Systems.

Mr. Maring,
You may copy this reply, and post on the forum if you like. Yes, the warranty does cover leakage.

The poster is absolutely correct in stating that a sensor added at the end of a wheel stem does increase the possibility of leakage. However, if pressure does drop, the sensor will indicate that drop with an alarm (whether it is leaking tire, valve stem, faulty seal, etc.). So, even a problem with the sensor will be detected.

I have sold TPMS for over 7 years, and have seen less that 1% of the sensors leak. I estimate that over 100, 000 systems have been sold by various companies, and again, you will find very minimal amount of problems with sensor leakage. Also, the weight of our sensors is .03 ounces, not enough to throw the tire balance off. I believe the pros definitely outweigh the cons in purchasing a TPMS.

Thank you,

Daryl Lawrence
Lawrence RV Accessories Inc
TireTraker Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems
Progressive Industries Electrical Protection Systems
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Old 06-09-2011, 12:49 PM   #11
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race cars have popoff valves like that that are cheaper...you can set them to desired pressure....thing is most trailer tire problems come from being low not high and theres no way to add while driving.....only let out
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Old 06-10-2011, 04:06 PM   #12
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They are connected and as the tire get hotter the valve stem gets hotter.

I have balanced out my side to side weight to even out the temps.

It is much easier to do after dark. LOL

Bill K
The tire stem is connected to the rim, not the tire itself. The tire stem is surrounded by outside air and when the tire is rotating there is a significant amount of outside air traveling fast over the surface of the stem increasing the heat transfer coeficient. The air inside the tire is not traveling rapidly in and out of the tire stem and will not transfer the heat from the tire to the sensor at the end of the valve stem very effectively. Because of the high rate of heat transfer from the outside, and the low rate from inside, the temperature at the end of the valve stem will be more closely linked to the outside temperature than to the inside temperature. Many valve stems are made of a plastic or rubber type material that does not conduct heat very well. It does not seem like a very good location to measure the tire temperature. If there was a temperature probe that was inserted down the valve stem into the tire cavity, that would give a good reading. This is not an issue for pressure because any location inside the tire or valve stem will be at the same pressure.
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Old 06-10-2011, 05:33 PM   #13
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It works for me and I can see it working.

BTW all valve stems are not made out of rubber or plastic.

I have very short metal stems that are held on with a nut.

Bill K


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The tire stem is connected to the rim, not the tire itself. The tire stem is surrounded by outside air and when the tire is rotating there is a significant amount of outside air traveling fast over the surface of the stem increasing the heat transfer coeficient. The air inside the tire is not traveling rapidly in and out of the tire stem and will not transfer the heat from the tire to the sensor at the end of the valve stem very effectively. Because of the high rate of heat transfer from the outside, and the low rate from inside, the temperature at the end of the valve stem will be more closely linked to the outside temperature than to the inside temperature. Many valve stems are made of a plastic or rubber type material that does not conduct heat very well. It does not seem like a very good location to measure the tire temperature. If there was a temperature probe that was inserted down the valve stem into the tire cavity, that would give a good reading. This is not an issue for pressure because any location inside the tire or valve stem will be at the same pressure.
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Old 06-10-2011, 05:39 PM   #14
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I think the temperature function may be very useful even if it does not provide the absolute tire temperature.

Though the monitor may not show absolute tire emperatures it will probably show differences between tires, a true indicator of a problem.

Certainly using metal stems is prefered, for their strength and for better heat flow.

Norm
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