Seasoning a new dutch oven - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-07-2008, 02:17 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
I made a lifter out of a three-prong garden tool by bending the center prong all the way back -- I can lift or shift the lid easily and the tool packs in the pot.

I recall reading in a tips column in Yankee Magazine that the best way to 'unseason' cast iron to start the seasoning process again was to put the pot and lid in a pile of oak leaves in the Fall and set the pile alight, letting it all burn down and then cool down slowly.

If anyone is in the vicinity of the Lodge factory in Tennessee, I understand they have some really good deals on seconds (which I am told are extremely hard to detect from firsts).

I recall seeing one family camping in Great Smokey Mountains Natl Park, where the Dad had the entire Lodge outfit including the table to cook on (Heavy!!). Mom thought it was a tiny tad overkill, but she wasn't about to criticize as long as Dad was eager to cook -- And he was a good cook, sharing with his camp neighbors, of course.

http://www.lodgemfg.com/images/gear_category_Img.jpg
__________________

__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2008, 03:58 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
Posts: 4,365
If you buy Lodge you get quality. You get lids that fit. You go cheap and you get lids that don't and that is a critical element for cooking.

But, over to peanut oil. Maybe I know nothing. But, a freind of ours teaches at a school in a low-income area. She notes that the kids at her school don't have peanut allergies, because that's what they can afford to eat. We've now got a whole industry built on allergies, and I'm not buying it.

As a kid in Africa, I ate all kinds of stuff that you either were supposed to wash or not eat at all. And, I, and the other kids did a lot better than our parents who took their pills and were careful what they ate.

baglo
__________________

__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2008, 09:49 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
Quote:
Another benefit of cast iron: friends of mine in their 80's were getting their yearly checkups. The doctor couldn't believe how high their iron levels were, considering their ages. Edna told him it was because she had cooked with cast iron all their lives.
Remember when SunMaid raisins were mentioning iron as one of the benefits to the product? They don't mention it anymore -- Reportedly the iron was coming from processing with cast iron vats, but when they upgraded the system to stainless steel pots...
__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2008, 10:04 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
I agree fully with regard to bacteria-based upbringing; studies have shown that farm-raised kids develop so many immunities that they get sick far less than city kids. That's sort of a Nurture kind of development.

Allergies, however, are a different story because they seem to be encoded in our DNA from our genes. Shellfish allergies run through my family, apparently from my mother's side -- I didn't have an allergic reaction to shrimp (and I've eaten many quarts of the tasty little bugs in my time) until I was in my 60's-- That's sort of a Nature kind of development.

Unfortunately, they don't have any cures yet for food allergies.

I was also allergic to bee stings, having been stung many times as a kid, but after a severe incident in the service, where I was falling unconscious and had to be med-evaced, I took the shot series and am no longer allergic to insect stings (which I have field-tested many times). I sure wish I could get back to eating shrimp, crawfish (fresh water and Florida Spiny), lobster, scallops, clams, mussels, etc.

My ex-wife has all sorts of food and vegetation allergies, which she has apparently passed on to our daughter, but our son has shown no allergies yet. Both raised in the same household.
__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2008, 11:48 AM   #19
Moderator
 
Frederick L. Simson's Avatar
 
Name: Frederick
Trailer: Fiber Stream
California
Posts: 8,151
Registry
Send a message via AIM to Frederick L. Simson
Talking

Quote:
2) For those that have not bought yet. Buy Lodge brand - they are now preseasoned and are a USA made product. Lodge is substantially better than the other brands.
I watch the Discovery Chanel and recently saw a "new" show: Some Assembly Required.
Quote:
EPISODE 6
[b]Brian travels to South Pittsburg, Tennessee to the Lodge Cast Iron Cookware to learn how to make cast-iron cookware. Then, on to Old Town, Maine where for the last 100 years the craftsmen of Old Town Canoes have made some of the world's finest watercraft.
Airs Thursday, August 21st at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT
__________________
Frederick - The Scaleman
1978 Fiber Stream 16 named "Eggstasy" & 1971 Compact Jr. named "Boomerang"
Frederick L. Simson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2008, 11:45 AM   #20
Member
 
Trailer: 1992 Scamp 13 ft
Posts: 56
Our dutch oven worked great. I followed the directions for burning off the wax coating. then scrubbed it clean and dried it on low heat. I used Olive Oil to season. There was a website and I will have to see if I can find it again that listed all the smoke points of different oils. It was recommended to use oil with a high smoke point and to season at high temperature. Olive Oil has a high smoke point. I ended up doing 2 full coats and heating, the first didn't seem to set in certain spots. The 2nd turned out good.

I do have another question though I read several places that said that your cast iron should be pre-heated. So I did pre-heat and everything turned out fine. But I have also seen warnings to not put cold liquid in/on heated cast iron? We made stuffed peppers, so tomato paste is used and it was at room temp. Could we have put all the food in the dutch oven and then put it on the coals? Or should we pre-heat both the oven and the ingredients?
__________________
Lars H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2008, 11:32 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 1998 17 ft Casita Spirit Deluxe / Red F150 X-Cab
Posts: 335
I don't think room temp is a big deal. I think they're saying don't do what I did many years ago: I forgot my cast iron pan on the stove and when I remembered it was actually so hot it was glowing. I grabbed it off the stove and stuck it in the sink and ran cold water over it to cool it down...CRACK!!!!!! It was immediate! So I was stupid, in my 20's, what can I say?

Quote:
Our dutch oven worked great. I followed the directions for burning off the wax coating. then scrubbed it clean and dried it on low heat. I used Olive Oil to season. There was a website and I will have to see if I can find it again that listed all the smoke points of different oils. It was recommended to use oil with a high smoke point and to season at high temperature. Olive Oil has a high smoke point. I ended up doing 2 full coats and heating, the first didn't seem to set in certain spots. The 2nd turned out good.

I do have another question though I read several places that said that your cast iron should be pre-heated. So I did pre-heat and everything turned out fine. But I have also seen warnings to not put cold liquid in/on heated cast iron? We made stuffed peppers, so tomato paste is used and it was at room temp. Could we have put all the food in the dutch oven and then put it on the coals? Or should we pre-heat both the oven and the ingredients?
__________________
Lisa M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 09:41 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Tom Trostel's Avatar
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: 1980 Bigfoot 17 ft
Texas
Posts: 1,300
Registry
Send a message via AIM to Tom Trostel Send a message via MSN to Tom Trostel
Lars,
Don't worry about preheating unless a recipe calls for something like browning meat as a first step. I've cooked at several dutch oven gatherings (DOGS) with 50+ others cooking and nobody was preheating their pots.
Tom Trostel
__________________
1980 Bigfoot 17' & former owner of 1973 Compact Jr
Tom Trostel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2008, 10:51 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 2006 (25B21RB) 21 ft Bigfoot / Dodge 2500 Diesel
Posts: 109
Most of the time pre-heating is not required. When I do breads or when I want to speed things along, I do the standard practice of preheating the lid while preparing the ingredients in the dutch.
__________________

__________________
Dean & Mary is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New dutch oven! Lisa M. Camp Cooking, Food & Recipes 5 08-18-2008 10:44 PM
Dutch Oven Thanksgiving Byron Kinnaman General Chat 6 11-25-2007 11:41 PM
Dutch Oven Questions Emmit D. Acklin Camp Cooking, Food & Recipes 2 11-18-2005 11:17 PM
Dutch Oven Cooking Legacy Posts Camp Cooking, Food & Recipes 23 07-17-2003 11:17 AM
Dutch Oven Legacy Posts Camp Cooking, Food & Recipes 22 01-07-2003 01:01 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.