Seasoning a new dutch oven - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-25-2008, 10:50 AM   #1
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We just bought a new 4 qt dutch oven. I read through the seasoning instructions and will try to do this in the next few days. We have another camping trip Sep 5 so I want Sherry to try her stuffed peppers in it. Looking for tips to make sure it is seasoned properly.
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Old 08-25-2008, 04:45 PM   #2
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We have tons of cast iron (figuratively, but close) and all I've ever done is coat the inside with peanut oil and heat it until it smokes, let it cool, and repeat. I usually do it three or four times. Using it for deep frying occasionally also helps. (WARNING: DO NOT USE GRIDDLE FOR DEEP FRYING! [This warning is required by OSHA and my lawyer. ])

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Old 08-25-2008, 06:25 PM   #3
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We just bought a new 4 qt dutch oven. I read through the seasoning instructions and will try to do this in the next few days. We have another camping trip Sep 5 so I want Sherry to try her stuffed peppers in it. Looking for tips to make sure it is seasoned properly.
Just go to Lodge.com and you'll find the instructions for doing it properly. The oil to use, the heat, and turning your pans upside down so the oil doesn't pool.

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Old 08-25-2008, 09:53 PM   #4
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We have tons of cast iron (figuratively, but close) and all I've ever done is coat the inside with peanut oil and heat it until it smokes, let it cool, and repeat. I usually do it three or four times. Using it for deep frying occasionally also helps. ([b]WARNING: DO NOT USE GRIDDLE FOR DEEP FRYING! [This warning is required by OSHA and my lawyer. ])

Pat
p.s.: Never wash seasoned cast iron with soap! I just wipe it clean with a paper towel. This drives my wife crazy, but when you pre-heat it you are sterilizing it.

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Old 08-25-2008, 10:05 PM   #5
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My sister's mother-in-law has always put a handful of salt in the pan and wiped it around with a paper towel. Her pans are who knows how many decades old and the inside is as smooth as a silver spoon. Someday maybe mine will be like that.

Another benefit of cast iron: friends of mine in their 80's were getting their yearly checkups. The doctor couldn't believe how high their iron levels were, considering their ages. Edna told him it was because she had cooked with cast iron all their lives.
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Old 08-25-2008, 10:30 PM   #6
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I put a light coat of Camp Chef Cast Iron Conditioner on all surfaces. Place upside down on the top rack of a cold oven. Place foil on the rack beneath to catch any drips. Set the oven on 500 degrees F. and leave for one hour. Turn the oven off and let the cast iron cool in the oven for several hours.
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Old 08-26-2008, 10:47 AM   #7
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all I've ever done is coat the inside with peanut oil and heat it until it smokes, let it cool, and repeat.
I wonder if this might effect people with peanut allergies. I doubt anyone with the allergy would use this method, but I was thinking about sharing the food with others. If they asked if you used peanut products in the preparation of the food would you remember the "seasoning"? I would think canola oil may be a better choice...
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:22 PM   #8
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Lars,

This can be a touchy subject. The old saying (not my saying, just an old saying) “Loan out your car, loan out your wife, but never loan out your cast iron” says it all.
I'm a collector of old cast iron, mostly Griswold and have done a lot of seasoning. I will only give three thoughts here though.

1) What Glen said: “Go to lodge.com and read what they say" Note: They recommend solid vegetable oil for seasoning.

2) For those that have not bought yet. Buy Lodge brand - they are now preseasoned and are a USA made product. Lodge is substantially better than the other brands.

3) Seasoning is like painting, several thin coats are better than trying to apply a lot at one time. If you put it on too thick and it pools, you may never get an even coat.

Here is a picture of one of my pieces of cast-iron. This one is a Griswold Tite-Top Dutch Oven from the 40's.
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Old 08-26-2008, 02:20 PM   #9
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Thanks for all the replies. Dean&Mary that picture almost looks identical to the oven we bought. I did see a Lodge or two I think but they only had the really big ones, the lids did not have the "lip" either? The one we purchased is a 4 qt and I think the brand is Texsport. I do believe it is imported but for $20 I didn't feel I could go wrong trying it out. I did check out Lodge's website (www.lodgemfg.com). Along with that and the posts here, I should be able to get this seasoned.

Another question about the lid. Haven't used it yet, but I can foresee ashes from the lid getting inside when removing the lid? Even a little breeze?
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Old 08-26-2008, 05:17 PM   #10
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Another question about the lid. Haven't used it yet, but I can foresee ashes from the lid getting inside when removing the lid? Even a little breeze?
Remove the lid downwind (with the wind). You can also make a ring of foil around the edge to increase the lip.

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Old 08-26-2008, 08:20 PM   #11
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Here is a link to a good discussion about seasoning.

http://www.dutchovendoctor.com/CastIronSeasoning.htm

About the lid and ashes, does your pot lid have a raised rim?
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Old 08-29-2008, 02:11 PM   #12
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Here is a link to a good discussion about seasoning.

http://www.dutchovendoctor.com/CastIronSeasoning.htm
Tom, Thanks for the link. I enjoyed reading it and learned some more about seasoning.

Lars, I have never found the ashes to be a problem.

Here is a picture of a one of my working 12 inch Dutch Ovens.


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Old 08-29-2008, 11:03 PM   #13
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The best way to keep ashes (boy scout pepper) out of the Dutch oven while cooking is to have a top quality lid lifter. There is none better than a Mair lifter. Once I bought one all the others have been left in the garage to gather dust.

Tom Trostel

http://www.mairdutchovenlifter.com/
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Old 08-30-2008, 10:18 AM   #14
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The Mair's lid lifter is definitely the way to go. That lid lifter and a pair of welding gloves and you're set. The Mair's lifter used to be mail order only, but I believe both Cabela's and Sportsman's carries them.
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