What are the easiest meals to cook while camping? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-30-2018, 03:30 AM   #1
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What are the easiest meals to cook while camping?

Whether you go out with your family or alone, in a campsite or in the middle of the wilderness, sitting next to the campfire and enjoying a warm meal is one of the most rewarding experiences of an outdoor trip. Won’t you love to have the recipes of some of the easiest meals to cook while camping? Everybody loves them to be quick and easy because you don’t want to spend hours on cooking.

Pancakes: Pancakes can be super easy, as the mix is light and portable. Check to be sure your mix only requires water, or else be prepared to carry along eggs etc. With butter, cinnamon or syrup pancakes are amazing on a cold morning.

Pita Pizzas: Prepare a pita pocket for each camper by cutting full sized pitas in half. Fill each half with shredded cheese and tomato sauce (be sure not to overstuff!). You can also add toppings like pepperoni and veggies inside. Fry up each pocket in butter or oil in skillet over the fire, flipping quickly. It's almost like making grilled cheese.

Chili and Cornbread: If you've got a big pot, chili is a breeze. You probably have your own favorite recipe. Use a cast iron skillet over an open fire to bake cornbread (a dutch oven is perfect) which will make a super hearty dinner.

What is your favorite one during camping trip?
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Old 01-30-2018, 04:05 AM   #2
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Well Dennis, from the question you ask in your thread title, nuking something for a minute or two doesn't get much easier .
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Old 01-30-2018, 04:32 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Borrego Dave View Post
Well Dennis, from the question you ask in your thread title, nuking something for a minute or two doesn't get much easier .
Dave, while it’s a bit more work, our preference is to grill something. Paper plates for meals unless it is really juicy or requires a sharp knife. But when it rains, the nuke it is. Easiest of all, however, if the day has been spent sightseeing is to find an interesting place to dine before returning to the campsite. But as to the OP’s question, very easy and little work, any of a number of meat, potato, and vegetable combinations wrapped in aluminum foil and cooked on the grill. These don’t even have to be flipped.
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Old 01-30-2018, 05:26 AM   #4
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Easy, but not Fast...

We actually spend more time cooking and eating at camp than at home. It's our way of slowing down the pace of life, and we enjoy cooking from scratch with fresh ingredients. We don't enjoy washing dishes, though, so we do a lot of grilling and one-pot stir-fries.

One of our favorites is a two-fer. We grill meat and veggies in the evening on our Weber Little Joe, eaten with fresh, local bread. Then we chop and saute the leftovers with scrambled eggs in the morning. Wrapped in a tortilla it makes a great breakfast burrito you can eat out of hand. Pass the hot sauce!

When we return to camp late and tired, or the weather is lousy, and there's not a nice restaurant nearby... our back-up standby is spicy Korean ramen. We carry the individual serving bowls, so all you do is boil water. No clean-up.

We camp without power, so no nukes for us.
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Old 01-30-2018, 06:30 AM   #5
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We eat the same at home as on the road

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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
We actually spend more time cooking and eating at camp than at home. It's our way of slowing down the pace of life, and we enjoy cooking from scratch with fresh ingredients. We don't enjoy washing dishes, though, so we do a lot of grilling and one-pot stir-fries.
I'll agree with Jon about taking the time to cook adds to the "Zen" of camping for me. I've never asked Laura so I don't really know if she likes the things that I cook when we're camping but I know she enjoys it when we're at home. (I love to cook so I'm the official chef in our house.)

I like to use the freshest ingredients that I can find but that's not a deal breaker either. In summer, we enjoy the grill more than anything and we have even been able to make pizza from scratch as well as cookies on the grill. We even tried a birthday cake once that didn't go well, but that's my fault.

The dishes are more than a little annoying but I figure that's the price of eating. At home, we use the dishwasher but when camping we use a plastic tote with a battery operated shower sprayer for rinsing. It takes some time but I feel a lot of accomplishment when we're done. Sometimes, we'll just pitch the dirty dishes into the tote and leave them until the tote is full before we wash up. But that's rare and the tote would only accommodate two meals before we're out of space. This crazy plan works well when we just want to get out and hike or ride our bicycles somewhere after breakfast. Then, when we return for lunch, we can wash both breakfast and lunch dishes at the same time. We do figure it'd be a bad idea to hold dinner dishes overnight.

We have one of the little grills (Cobb Grill) that can cook a complete meal pretty quickly when we're cooking outside. We haven't had the opportunity to cook in the Bigfoot we've recently purchased but having double sinks will make clean up easier and there is a lot more counter space if we're relegated to cooking inside because of bad weather.

To me, cooking is a part of the camping experience and I like to do it right.


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Old 01-30-2018, 09:18 AM   #6
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While Pancakes are "Easy" they are messy. French toast is MUCH easier. Having been a Boy Scout leader for 10 years (and an Eagle Scout) we have many easy camping meals. On our long trips, Gettysburg, South Dakota, etc. We smoke pulled pork and turkeys ahead of time and shred all of the meat at home. We put them in baggies and freeze them. Once on the road, they slowly defrost in the cooler and are perfect when ready to eat. We just pull them out and warm them up.

Another easy breakfast is breakfast burritos. Basically we just take any left overs from the previous meals and warm them up in a skillet, add scrambled eggs and wrap them up in a flour tortilla. Thrifty, tasty, and easy to make, easy to clean.

Hope this helps!
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Old 01-30-2018, 09:28 AM   #7
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I guess I'm the odd man out, but I don't like to grill much on the road. Too messy.
My favorite cooker is the Coleman propane skillet.
It can handle almost any breakfast all by itself: On one side, eggs almost any style, or pancakes; on the other side bacon or sausage, (don't much care for ham) and still room for a buttered English muffin or two.
For dinner I do a lot of stir frys with veggies or potatoes and onions, often some mushrooms preferably crimini, and cutup pork, chicken or beef. I also do pan fried fish a lot, no breading, but various seasonings, depending on the fish.
All on the skillet with very easy cleanup, just the removable, cast aluminum top.

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Old 01-30-2018, 09:51 AM   #8
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The fastest, easiest breakfast is Wisconsin deer hunting / camping oatmeal
Take 2 pkgs of instant oatmeal with fruit and place in a paper bowl
Add 1 heaping teaspoon of instant coffee to the bowl
Add boiling water to the oatmeal & coffee mixture and stir.
When done dispose of paper bowl in wood stove or camp fire

Remember your eating breakfast at 4:00 AM
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Old 01-30-2018, 10:11 AM   #9
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We think hot dogs on a stick over the campfire are pretty easy. You can also wrap scrubbed, pierced potatoes in heavy aluminum foil and put them in the coals if you're not in a hurry.

If you have a fire.

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Old 01-30-2018, 10:38 AM   #10
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For simplicity, pie irons make great breakfast and lunch sandwiches. I'm surprised they aren't more common.

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Old 01-30-2018, 10:50 AM   #11
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For a while, I was under the impression that several of my old friends were coming to visit me. Turns out one of the bigger reasons is my wife's Chinese cooking. She makes an incredible spicy beef, jalepeno, onion stir fry and always makes extra that turns into burritos for breakfast or lunch. Out camping, it only takes a couple minutes to warm up a flour tortilla, make a burrito and sit down outside with a nice cup of coffee.

Since we're not in a hurry, it's nice to fire up the grill and make a more traditional bacon and eggs breakfast with home fry potatoes. Takes a while, but the scenery is excellent.

Or just a quick bowl of oatmeal. But it doesn't live up to the pleasure of being outside and camping.

Coffee adds a lot to the situation. A big insulated mug that can be savored and re-fiiled a couple of times, starts the casual morning off right.

Morning or evening, it's funny how the cooking, eating and campfire are such a big part of the whole experience. It's also where plans are made for the day's activities.
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Old 01-30-2018, 10:51 AM   #12
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For simplicity, pie irons make great breakfast and lunch sandwiches. I'm surprised they aren't more common.

Walt
I just got one and haven't tries it out yet. Looking forward to it. Any pointers?
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Old 01-30-2018, 10:58 AM   #13
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The "Trough"

Golden Corral if it's close.

All you can choke with lot's of vegetables and salad!

Clean up is pretty easy also!
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Old 01-30-2018, 11:00 AM   #14
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I just got one and haven't tries it out yet. Looking forward to it. Any pointers?
Not really. Almost any sandwich'll do well as long as you coat the iron with something, like spray oil, etc. Or coating the sandwich on both sides with butter before cooking makes a really rich morsel.
My fave is grilled cheese, bacon and tomato.
And you aren't limited to sandwiches either. There are a few good, inexpensive pie iron cookbooks available on Amazon.
BTW, if you find you like it, consider a dual model for either bigger appetites, or sharing with a companion.

One tip though, I hope you bought an iron model. The aluminum ones don't stand up to intense heat well.
Good luck and let us know how you fare (pun intended).

Walt
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