Downsizing - the tiny house trend - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-13-2016, 06:18 AM   #1
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Downsizing - the tiny house trend

The next step for those who have already downsized to a fgrv 😉Click image for larger version

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Sometimes I think this is where I'll end up....
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Old 02-13-2016, 10:18 AM   #2
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That Winnabuggy is getting really tiny!! I cannot understand the huge interest in tiny stik built homes since they are not cheap by any means, and as we all know you can buy a very deluxe fiberglass trailer for prices they charge for these stick tiny homes which will not last near as long as a good FG trailer. Personally I would never consider buying a tiny home over a FG trailer. Just doesn't make sense to me. Massive weight, is a big downside.
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Old 02-13-2016, 10:22 AM   #3
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Thats pretty funny. Would that be considered a travel trailer or a mobile home?
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Old 02-13-2016, 10:50 AM   #4
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WOW maybe I will no longer be considered homeless with my shopping cart!

If you build one from an Aldi cart you can get your $.25 back when you park it as well.

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Old 02-13-2016, 11:15 AM   #5
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The Tiny House movement as a response to an emerging reality

That's a humorous reference to an underlying emerging reality (sorry to say). The fact is, America's economy appears on a slow downward slide, and it is an unfortunate fact that most people believe that future generations won't have as good a life as we have now (think college kids who graduate and can't find jobs; think of millions of adults currently living in their parents' basements; think of the millions of people who have simply given up trying to find a job, and thus don't show up on unemployment figures; and lastly consider the fact that a higher percentage of the American population today is on food stamps that ever before in our history). If all this is true, Americans are going to be living much "smaller and cheaper" in the future. Thus, the tiny house movement is driven only in part by fashionable concern for the environment and simpler lifestyles...it is also being driven by an emerging economic reality. If it turns out to be a permanent trend, "tiny houses" will be one solution to the problem. As others have noted here, travel trailers---especially fiberglass ones!---can be an even less expensive and simpler solution to needing to live a far more frugal life than in the past. Me? I'm planning on it! :--)
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Old 02-13-2016, 12:55 PM   #6
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Having watched far too many episodes of these Tiny House programs I must say that a solid travel trailer or 5th wheel would be far better than the overweight cramped disasters on wheels these folks create. Any quality RV has better appliances in the kitchen area, proper bathroom facilities, holding tanks, heat and A/C plus a water heater. It is like these air heads have never even layed their eyes on a RV in their lives. I have to question how they can even register these rolling disasters.

The issue the program series fails to address is local building codes and town approval for placement of these units without sewer and water connections.
Most towns and villages would not issue a certificate of occupancy to any of these creations.

Better off buying a small bungalow or cottage sized home that complies with building codes if they want a permanent location...or...a Travel trailer/5th wheel and park it at a campground if they seek mobility.

The program does follow the first golden rule of television production...
"audiences is stupid". This one hit the mark.
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Old 02-13-2016, 01:03 PM   #7
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I concur Uplander. I watch Tiny House for the comedy.
They spend far too much for far too little and they don't include the cost of the land to park the thing on, if you are even allowed to.
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Old 02-13-2016, 07:38 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uplander View Post

The issue the program series fails to address is local building codes and town approval for placement of these units without sewer and water connections.
Most towns and villages would not issue a certificate of occupancy to any of these creations.

Better off buying a small bungalow or cottage sized home that complies with building codes if they want a permanent location...or...a Travel trailer/5th wheel and park it at a campground if they seek mobility.
This is the exact reason why you are seeing the emergence of "Park Homes" as some call them. They meet construction codes, move onto a lot, hook up the utilities and your are living large!

Quite a few shown at RVIA last December in Louisville. This "homes" are transportable with permit and escort to a fixed location. They can again be moved but are not considered mobile as they require a permit and escort to transport like a mobile home. You see quite a few of these now for rent in resort areas.

Modular homes will certainly be a larger trend in the future. Quite a few great factory built modular homes available NOW and yes you can spend $500K building one.

Here are some pics from the "Park Homes" at RVIA. Quite a few interesting design features in these homes.
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Old 02-13-2016, 07:40 PM   #9
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Mo Pics

ALL of this for $60K OR LESS!!!!

Don't like the neighbors????


Saddle up the house and MOVE it!!!
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Old 02-14-2016, 08:27 AM   #10
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In response to some of the very negative comments about Tiny Homes (and the people who like them):

1) Tiny Homes are completely customized, built by the owner themself or to their exact specs. WAY more so than any RV trailer.

2) Tiny Homes offer any building products the owner wishes, can go entirely "green" if you wish. No limits to the finishes used.

3) Tiny Homes offer the asthetics and feelings of a more conventional home. Virtually no particle board/plastics/fiberglass unless you want them.

4) The typical Tiny Home is light years above the best of the RV trailers in regard to insulation and control of condensation.

5) Tiny Homes are designed and built for more permanent locations. They are easily movable, not intended to take on a two week vacation. Like comparing apples to bananas.

6) You can install any appliances you wish in a Tiny Home, not at all limited to "RV" appliances. You can have as many or as few as the owner deems necessary.

7) Most Tiny Home folks have adopted "on demand" water heaters as standard - makes much more sense to me than being limited to 4 or 6 gallons.

8) Most folks derive immense satisfaction from designing and building their own home - a primal feeling one does not get buying a ready-made trailer.

9) Most Tiny Homes are built by conventional means, so ANY reasonable carpenter or handyman can repair any problems that may occur, the owner is not at the mercy of RV Service Centers and their inflated prices when you encounter a repair you cannot handle yourself. Plus, every town/community has multiple handymen.

10) If one chooses to build thier own Tiny Home, there is virtually NO repair to the home itself that you cannot do yourself. Not so for most folks who buy their more conventional trailer.

11) Allows younger folks, who may be more job mobile, to start their careers in one location and move to another as their career progresses, without starting over with a new home.

12) Finally, you can build a completely serviceable, comfortable, and attractive Tiny Home for the same or less than our eggs new. The exorbitant prices that that TV show quotes are for the homes built by custom builders. The show is about earning big bucks for all involved. Do some better research before passing judgement.

Just a few of the reasons to choose a Tiny Home over a Travel Trailer. They are two very different beasts, meant for very different purposes. About the only commonality they have is a set of wheels, and those are not even necessary for a tiny home. Most of the time they are only there to enable the owner to build something this small - too many government regulations written by the building industry and financial institutions that favor, or should I say REQUIRE, homes to be way larger than is necessary. Bigger is more profitable for these institutions.

I love my Scamp, very appropriate for frequent travel. That said, if I were looking for a more permanent living arrangement, placing a home on a peice of land that I own, which I may well do in the future, a Tiny Home would be much more appropriate and cost effective for heating, cooling, all round comfort. Especially someplace like here in Michigan.
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Old 02-14-2016, 08:44 AM   #11
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Well said Lyle. While a Tiny House may or may not be in my future, I understand what I want or like is not the same as others. So... YMMV.
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Old 02-14-2016, 10:55 AM   #12
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I was discussing the TV show, not the movement to build small houses.
Lived in my 800 sq. ft. house for 35 years. I'd rather live in my trailer than those examples shown on the show.
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Old 02-14-2016, 11:32 AM   #13
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Why reinvent the wheel....a travel trailer is for travel...a park model is for a semi-permanent unit in a campground.
If you are seeking a permanent home and for whatever reason (money-space-need to satisfy some strange compulsion) then go knock yourself out and build one of these strange fad structures.....however if you want superior quality, energy efficiency and customizable living space look into modular construction.
These well designed homes come anyway you want then from small to huge.
You work with professionals. You can elect to do the interior finish as a do it yourself project. The structure will meet and/or exceed building codes in all areas of North America and certificates of occupancy are all but automatic as these structures are all certified BOCA Code compliant.

Yet another way to go is to work with Amish builders who produce those sheds you see sold almost everywhere. They offer larger structures that are "Factory Built" in their barns and delivered in large sections designed for on site assembly. Once these are erected on your foundation you can finish the interior to your own desires. Note I said "on your foundation" and not on a steel frame like most of the "Tiny Houses" I have seen on TV. Because both the Modular units and the Amish units are delivered in sections and assembled on site they need not be as narrow as a travel trailer making them more livable and not cramped narrow torture chambers.

All things to consider that beat the Tiny House fad while offering sound cost effective alternatives for those hell bent on downsizing.

Downsize...simplify....and...economize...but not in an 8 foot wide box on wheels
unless you are camping in a FGRV !

The best thing about the Tiny House Fad is it has supplied countless hours of television programming that supply a few laughs to veteran RV campers who have to be wondering why bother when better living units were created decades ago.
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Old 02-14-2016, 11:58 AM   #14
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Lyle, Building codes apply to any structure over 100 sq ft designed for human habitation. They were developed to insure safety and cover items like framing strength, electrical safety, plumbing, sanitation and local code requirements.
You will discover that many towns, villages and cities require a minimum number of square feet in order to be certified and issued a certificate of occupancy. This is done to maintain the character of the area. I for one do not want a shack built next to my home that reduces my property value.

You will also discover that "on demand gas hot water systems are currently being offered by most RV manufacturers.

What is or is not required in building codes is not designed by the building industry to increase the size or cost of dwellings but by duly authorized officials attempting to protect consumers from substandard building practices and dangerous corner cutting. Fact is the number one complaint source for consumer protection authorities nationally is about home builders and home remodelers.
This industry is overpopulated by rip-off artists.
The rules, building codes and minimums are there to protect consumers and not increase industry profits.

Consumers who are captivated by this Tiny House Movement are ripe targets for fly by night building contractors.
Some of the top heavy Tiny Houses on wheels I see on TV are frightening !
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