Features In A Full-Time Egg - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-30-2012, 09:45 AM   #15
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Name: John
Trailer: 2006 Bigfoot 25RQ
Florida
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We are planning to launch this year and have been planning and saving for a while now. I cannot agree more about getting into as many as you can. I also think you have to spend at least an hour in any you think you want. The excitement will start to wane and you can realistically begin to visualize how you'd live in it. We are partial to Bigfoot, ours has the thermal pane windows, but there are many really good FG manufacturers around.

Things I think should be considered are:
Camp ground preference. Do you like RV parks, State, Federal etc...
Camping style. Are you an RV'er or a camper?
Are you outside or inside people (or one of each)?
Power preferences? Always full hook-ups, electric and water, electric only, boon-docking...
What are you going to do? Climb mountains, raft or kayak, bike rides, photography, just sit and stare...
Length of stays. A month, a week, a couple days, turn and burn and fast as you can...
Average temperatures. Freezing, boiling...

Your answers will probably be percentage combinations to the above. You then have to figure out what you want vs. what you need vs. what your willing to put up with in a camper.
Things to consider:
Tank sizes. 12 gallon black won't last long while boon docking.
Fridge/freezer. What size will work?
An oven?
Television? Antenna, satellite, both?
Heated and enclosed tanks?
Solar? Number of batteries, inverter size...
CCC. Translates to weight, weight weight! Not you, all the stuff and options in the camper.

Once you have had about four migraines and your spreadsheets look like an actuarial training lesson you are ready to look at floor plans and tow vehicles... that's when it gets hard!

So my only real advice is make the camper fit you and not your stuff fit into the camper.

-John
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Old 01-30-2012, 04:37 PM   #16
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Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
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Trailer Size

There are so many factors to consider including comfort, cost and use. Here's a few thoughts from some of our experiences.

We started in a Motorhome with about 260 square feet of living space with 32' x 8.5' with 50 or so large draws, cabinets and storage compartments and now live in 65 square feet with 20 small drawers and storage compartments.

We are perfectly comfortable in the smaller space.

Cost
We were filled up our gas tank today. We have spent $800 for gas for 5500 miles since we left NH 10 weeks ago, that includes 2200 towing miles and 3300 exploring miles.

Ginny said we would have spent $1500 if we had our motohome, an additional $700 for fuel over 10 weeks. If we were towing with a diesel truck that got 15 mpg it would have been as much as the motorhome.

The size of the trailer also relates to the size of the tow vehicle. Bigger tow vehicles can cost more than smaller tow vehicles.

An additional $250 a month for fuel can be a big deal for some full timers. Cost is an issue.

Use.
We were never campers before we retired to RVing. We generally lived well and considered ourselves happy in ample dwellings. For 11 years we've lived in small and now smaller spaces. We have never been happier. The limited space pales next to the unlimited freedom and the limitless stimulation.

Hope this helps.... different strokes for .....
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Old 01-30-2012, 07:12 PM   #17
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Trailer: 2005 Casita Spirit Deluxe
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Quote:
We were never campers before we retired to RVing. We generally lived well and considered ourselves happy in ample dwellings. For 11 years we've lived in small and now smaller spaces. We have never been happier. The limited space pales next to the unlimited freedom and the limitless stimulation.

Hope this helps.... different strokes for .....
Wonderful perspective, Norm.

I am certainly not a full timer, but the most frustrated I've been in a camper is when I tried to deal with too much stuff crammed into it -- stuff that I considered necessary.

Our camping enjoyment has skyrocketed since we trimmed the stuff down to bare essentials.

I realize that minimalists like us are a small minority.

For most people, trying to fulltime (or semi-fulltime) in a tiny trailer like ours would probably be an exercise in misery. To me, it sounds like pure freedom.
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Old 02-01-2012, 07:25 AM   #18
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Name: Cathy
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We have a radio auction on our local station each year and it is running now and they usually bid off like a two-week use of one of those construction size dumpsters and I keep mentioning that would suit my purposes well. I am so overwhelmed by stuff and if I left now, I could probably put those things that make a difference in the car backseat and trunk. (teddy bear from my first Easter, stuffed monkey Grandma gave me for my 8th birthday, a small box of photographs, my raw food cookbooks, crochet and knitting loom, food dehydrator, some reference books on herbal medicine, etc - probably 6 books.............As I walk through the house each day, I visually cull those items that I have no real use for and the townwide garage sale is in April! My husband is taking the house, the barking neighbor dogs, high taxes, the drought, the dust, the lawn mowing, etc. We have talked about full-timing forever and I have decided not to wait any longer. Life is short.
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Old 02-01-2012, 08:33 AM   #19
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Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
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Small Advice

I would not fill the back seat and trunk with the 'special stuff" but rather with the items you need. The small amount of special stuff can easily be stored with a good friend.

Our approach was to figure out what we need. Only after the needs can we think of what we want.

Full timing needs are first, it's sort of like the Conestoga times. As people progressed west the route was littered with stuff they 'wanted' versus 'needed'.

When we started in the motorhome we carried books. Now all our favorite recipes are in the computer's memory. When we want a recipe that's not in the computer we find it on the Internet.

When we bought our first RV we parked it in the front yard, loaded it with what we need and moved in for a couple of months just as if we were on the road. At the end of the time consider what you used and didn't use. Good practice for reality.

Some thoughts from our experience.....
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Old 02-01-2012, 09:18 AM   #20
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Trailer: LiL Snoozy
South Carolina
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My two cents

It seems that I have come a little late to this discussion, but I wanted to put my two cents in. I will restate what Bill said, since we (Lil Snoozy) are building our campers one at a time and by hand, we can accommodate some custom features requested. Extra cabinets are not a difficult change. Bill knows this first hand because we are adding an some to his.
A crystal chandelier or jacuzzi might be a little more difficult.

Sweating is something common with anything made out of fiberglass. Fiberglass acts like metal in this respect, it is completely solid and air tight. It also has very little (if any) insulating properties. Correct me if I am wrong, but Scamp and Casita both use "Rat Fur" for insulation and sweat control.
The Rat Fur treats the symptoms of the sweating (the actual moister build up on the inside). It soaks up the moister and if not dried out periodically it can mold. I believe it is the Egg that uses a double shell system with an airspace between them. (also correct me if I am mistaken) To my knowledge this works very well. At Lil Snoozy we attack the problem from a different angle. Our cored fiberglass construction laminates 3/8in foam between two bulk layers of fiberglass. This negates the cause of sweating while adding strength and insulation.

One easy solution that I have found in my boating experience is, if you have a sweating problem currently, crack a window slightly. This small bit of ventilation should exchange enough air to combat a decent amount of the sweating.

Cathy,
As Donna D said, you cannot go wrong with a fiberglass camper. We where at a Home/trade show this past weekend and I spoke with a couple that purchased their current fiberglass camper (I think if was a Boler) new in 1968. Talk about getting their money's worth! I wish you the best of luck in finding your perfect camper!

Nicholas Smoak
Lil Snoozy Campers
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Old 02-01-2012, 02:17 PM   #21
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We did have 3 people and a 75 lb. dog that full-timed for two years in a 24 foot stick-built and I am weaning that down to myself, a 60 lb. dog (perhaps a little dog added to the mix) and my teddy bear and Zippy - the stuffed monkey. The teddy bear has been following me for 56 years and the Zippy for almost 50 years so they are family, not stuff. Because I left home when I was 20, joined the military and continued to move, I lost the sense of "home" and the bear and Zippy are, therefore, my connection to my "roots".

I was studying the information online and noticed that Lil' Snoozy was wider on the outside and then saw that was due to the wheels being on the outside. I am betting it pulls very nicely too. We had, at one time, considered building a teardrop and I always thought that wheels on the outside would give one an edge on stability. When we were in the desert in AZ, going out to Gilbert Ray Campground, the edges of the road were rough - loved that place! So, I see this as a real plus.

I know before we moved into the 24 foot stick-built that we had the full-size van loaded with those plastic totes but as time went on, we were able to make a couple stops at a thrift shop and everything fit in the trailer. Stick-built was new but did not hold up and we dealt with the moisture especially with 3 people in a small place. We had so much time to spend doing things other than maintenance and upkeep.

I realized after moving back in a house that I "staged" the house rather than making it my home but the intention was to sell it when we finished the work it needed or, at least for me that was the plan. It looks totally "home" to others and I can hardly get them out of the house if anyone manages to get inside.

The issue with the cookbooks for raw foods is that it is a new thing for me and yes, I did compile my favorite recipes the last time we moved into a trailer.

This is a really big decision and I realize that. I over analyze every detail of everything - can't believe I have not driven myself totally bonkers yet or maybe I have? My life has been good and I am sure it shall continue that way. Attitude is everything, it truly is!
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Old 02-01-2012, 06:46 PM   #22
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Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
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Condensation

"Sweating is something common with anything made out of fiberglass. Fiberglass acts like metal in this respect, it is completely solid and air tight. It also has very little (if any) insulating properties. Correct me if I am wrong, but Scamp and Casita both use "Rat Fur" for insulation and sweat control.
The Rat Fur treats the symptoms of the sweating (the actual moister build up on the inside). It soaks up the moister and if not dried out periodically it can mold. I believe it is the Egg that uses a double shell system with an airspace between them. (also correct me if I am mistaken) To my knowledge this works very well. " Nicholas Smoak


Nicholas,
I believe a double wall structure does offer advantages. Over the last two years we have traveled in a Casita 16 and a Scamp 16. We travel 7-11 months a year.

In two over two years of travel in both a 1995 Casita 16 and a 1991 Scamp 16 I have never seen condensation on either trailer's carpeted/cloth surfaces.

We use our stove about two times a day and always for breakfast.

We have seen condensation on windows in both rigs because neither trailer has thermopane windows similar to most trailers.

We have seen condensation on the fiberglass bathroom walls of the Casita but have never seen condensation on the Scamp's fiberglass bathroom walls. I believe the Scamp has insulation in it's exterior bathroom walls that prevents condensation.

As well it seems to me that the carpeted surfaces of the Scamp has insulation between the carpet and fiberglass which would work to prevent condensation.

This may be unique to me but I have never heard anyone describe their carpeted walls of having condensate on them other than from a leak.

One owner's experience....
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Old 02-01-2012, 06:57 PM   #23
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Name: Cathy
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The stuff called "rat fur" is that like a marine grade carpeting rather than a floor carpeting? I noticed that Parkliner called it a "fuzzy", I believe, wall covering. What I saw in the Casita that I enlarged was not "fuzzy". My concern with anything "laminated" is, of course, is that it can separate. Saw 5 star trailers that delaminated in the stick-built industry but am not sure if there are different processes or something more updated with that. I also was looking at the difference between those with molded in cabinets and those that added wood-type. So many variations!
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Old 02-01-2012, 07:16 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiL Snoozy View Post
we can accommodate some custom features requested. Extra cabinets are not a difficult change. Bill knows this first hand because we are adding an some to his.
A crystal chandelier or jacuzzi might be a little more difficult.
No jacuzzis? geez, customer service is just not what it used to be!
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Old 02-01-2012, 08:22 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by jen b View Post
No jacuzzis? geez, customer service is just not what it used to be!
Yeah... I saw a crystal chandelier in an Aliner once. Of course, it was plastic!
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Old 02-02-2012, 05:23 PM   #26
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Name: Hazel
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Saskatchewan
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We have never spotted condensation in our Ventura. I don't know whether it is insulated or not - but I doubt it. It sleeps two adults and two small dogs but we always have the roof vent cracked, and almost always the small window in the 'kitchen'. If the weather is truly ok we open all the windows and enjoy the breezes.
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Old 02-03-2012, 09:48 PM   #27
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Hi Hazel, your ventura has about 3/4" of fiberglass batting in it. I torn the whole interior out of mine in October so know it quite well! Did mine in pine paneling.
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Old 02-08-2012, 07:52 AM   #28
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Name: Cathy
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After looking and looking at layouts/photos on the net, I have decided I really like the permanent bed option which is somewhat limiting a choice of manufacturers. I know that Lil' Snoozy and Escape offer the permanent bed with that nice storage under but do any others? I have to look over my notes again. I am not opposed to a used unit at all but they are so hard to come by especially here in the central US. The fifth-wheel because of the climbing, I'm not sure about as I did care for the larger 5th wheel we had and negotiating the steps in the middle of the night, I was never very graceful.
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