Foot-operated washing machine - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-08-2017, 03:54 PM   #1
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Foot-operated washing machine

yirego

This could definitely improve the boondocking experience. The design seems to be better than other human-powered washing mashines currently on the market. I can't wait to see one when they become available. If anyone has experience with any of the other human-powered washing machines out there, I would appreciate it if would share your opinion.
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Old 01-08-2017, 04:02 PM   #2
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Here's a really annoying video:

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Old 01-08-2017, 05:05 PM   #3
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Hummm, the FAQs say you can wash one pair of jeans at a time (Each load requires approximately 10 liters (2.6 gal) of water. We recommend 5 liters (1.3 gal) for a wash, and 5 liters (1.3 gal) for a rinse.)

The machine weighs 20 lbs.
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Old 01-08-2017, 05:16 PM   #4
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I'm thinking if you choose the right fabrics for your boondocking wardrobe- i.e., ditch the heavy all-cotton stuff- you shouldn't need a fancy washer/spin dryer. A quick hand wash in any old tub, squeeze dry, and hang. That's from my backpacking past… Shoot, I had stuff you could wash and wear dry in the right season!

I agree, Donna- this seems pretty heavy and bulky for a single-function item. And $240? Yikes! That's a lot of quarters...
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Old 01-08-2017, 05:37 PM   #5
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I agree with you Jon about the quick wash with the right fabrics. However, in my experience, all the lightweight synthetic fibers will always hold on to the funky smells no matter if they are infused with silver, bamboo, coconut, or whatever anti-smell technology is used. The only fibers that didn't smell after washing was high quality merino wool and that stuff is not cheap either. I figured Some people might balk at the cost of spending $70 dollars on a shirt or $$150 on a sweater. I love the stuff and think it is worth the $$ when used for intended purposes. However, I'm not going to buy that type of clothing for my child who will likely outgrow or destroy the garments before I get my money's worth. Then again, I read somewhere else this Drumi was just over $100, not over $200. Guess I needed to do a little more research.
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Old 01-08-2017, 05:43 PM   #6
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Or....
For $40 - $50 you could get the Scrubba. https://thescrubba.com/
Vic picked this up for me last year. I was doubtful but it really does a great job. It also does double duity as a dry sack for kayaking!
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Old 01-08-2017, 05:53 PM   #7
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I really can't see the Virego machine working very well. Washers work because they have a large drum turning at a low speed that allows the clothes to tumble, rub against each other and constantly change shape in the machine. The water can circulate freely between them. Simply taking a wadded up ball of clothes and spinning it in soapy water doesn't do that.
A few minutes washing a few items in the kitchen sink works well and it's no harder or time consuming than standing there pumping that foot pedal. Plus you don't have to buy the machine and find a place to store it.
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Old 01-09-2017, 07:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BASE1360 View Post
I agree with you Jon about the quick wash with the right fabrics. However, in my experience, all the lightweight synthetic fibers will always hold on to the funky smells no matter if they are infused with silver, bamboo, coconut, or whatever anti-smell technology is used. The only fibers that didn't smell after washing was high quality merino wool and that stuff is not cheap either. I figured Some people might balk at the cost of spending $70 dollars on a shirt or $$150 on a sweater. I love the stuff and think it is worth the $$ when used for intended purposes. However, I'm not going to buy that type of clothing for my child who will likely outgrow or destroy the garments before I get my money's worth. Then again, I read somewhere else this Drumi was just over $100, not over $200. Guess I needed to do a little more research.
My experience has been different than yours. My Polartec jacket (which I've had for years and never go anywhere without) often gets full of campfire smoke and cooking odors during the evening and early morning. Hang it in the sun for a couple of hours in midday where the air can circulate, and it's as good as freshly washed. Same thing happens to a high-cotton sweatshirt, and nothing but soap and water will take it out (and it takes forever to dry).

I know the latest name-brand outdoor clothing can be expensive. I would never pay those prices. Online, clearance, discount retailers- decent, lightweight synthetics (and appropriate natural fibers) don't have to cost a fortune. A couple pairs of rip stop nylon pants, several long and short-sleeved non-absorbent athletic tees, the trusty Polartec jacket, my favorite wool camping sweater (less than $20 on a clearance rack), an unlined Gore-Tex rain parka (discontinued color, label clipped, $40). It's possible to put together a low-maintenance outdoor wardrobe on the cheap, provided you don't insist on the latest style, color, or gimmicky technology.

I agree that kids make it a lot harder. Got a couple myself, but I've never gone boondocking with them longer than 4 days, so no laundry in the field.

Best wishes figuring out what works for you. If you decide to give one of the laundry devices a spin (haha), I hope you'll post a follow-up report. Product reviews are always helpful.
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Old 01-09-2017, 08:24 AM   #9
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While this machine may work and work well, I see water as being the main issue while boondocking. I still can't get past needing 2.6 gal of water to wash one pair of jeans. Might be able to get by washing several items before rinsing, but I know if there's soap left in my clothes, I get itchy.
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Old 01-09-2017, 03:18 PM   #10
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There's also a hand cranked washing machine that gets pretty good reviews. https://www.amazon.com/Laundry-Alter...ashing+machine
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Old 01-09-2017, 03:43 PM   #11
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Or you could really keep it simple and use this with your bucket.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00YQCOCAM?psc=1
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Old 01-09-2017, 06:36 PM   #12
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When I visited my brother in Idaho last July, he showed me a small antique hand-crank, drum washing machine made of wood. His wife's mother passed and they found this old thing, and he was listing it that day on CL. It was about 18" or 20" across IIRC and about the same in height, with 4 wooden beater bars inside the drum that would go around as you turned the crank. The wooden drum was no longer watertight, but the mechanism still turned just fine. We could make out a bit of the company and product name on the side, though not very well, and I think it was from the 1920s. It was a really neat piece. Just goes to show, the idea has been around for at least a hundred years.
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Old 01-09-2017, 08:05 PM   #13
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When I left on a several month trip in my old motorhome, I did just a little bit of research on clothes washing and the best, cheapest option I found was a plastic 5-gallon bucket and a toilet plunger, much like what they're selling in the Amazon link. I think that kind of setup would work really well. I bought a bucket and plunger...

I never used it. It was just me, and definitely no kids which I know changes everything, but I was out at one spot often for up to 6 days and just never needed to do laundry. And by "out" I mean 40-60 miles down a highway from a town, then another 10-30 miles down a dirt road, hours from the nearest business. If I was within an hour of a town I'd just drive in and do laundry every now and then. And I found that if I traveled from one spot to another once a week, doing laundry then when I was back on the road was plenty.

But that's me and everyone has their own idea of how they want to do it, and I can see the allure of sticking around camp, doing the laundry by hand and being self sufficient.

There were a lot of things I bought, figuring I'd need them during months on the road, leading up to the trip. A lot of what I bought I never used. A lot of what I never even considered buying, I had to grab somewhere along the way.

Not sure how experienced of an RV'er you are but if you haven't been out boondocking much yet, I'd wait until figuring out what you really need before spending much money on anything. If you've been there done that and know you need boondocking laundry services, then definitely go for it.
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Old 01-09-2017, 08:24 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZachO View Post
When I left on a several month trip in my old motorhome, I did just a little bit of research on clothes washing and the best, cheapest option I found was a plastic 5-gallon bucket and a toilet plunger, much like what they're selling in the Amazon link. I think that kind of setup would work really well. I bought a bucket and plunger...

I never used it. It was just me, and definitely no kids which I know changes everything, but I was out at one spot often for up to 6 days and just never needed to do laundry. And by "out" I mean 40-60 miles down a highway from a town, then another 10-30 miles down a dirt road, hours from the nearest business. If I was within an hour of a town I'd just drive in and do laundry every now and then. And I found that if I traveled from one spot to another once a week, doing laundry then when I was back on the road was plenty.

But that's me and everyone has their own idea of how they want to do it, and I can see the allure of sticking around camp, doing the laundry by hand and being self sufficient.

There were a lot of things I bought, figuring I'd need them during months on the road, leading up to the trip. A lot of what I bought I never used. A lot of what I never even considered buying, I had to grab somewhere along the way.

Not sure how experienced of an RV'er you are but if you haven't been out boondocking much yet, I'd wait until figuring out what you really need before spending much money on anything. If you've been there done that and know you need boondocking laundry services, then definitely go for it.
Zacho, I would love to know which things you went out and bought because you found you needed them and which things proved to be of not much use. Willing to share?
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