Live FT in RV in AZ or NV? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-21-2019, 09:39 PM   #1
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Live FT in RV in AZ or NV?

Last year I left my job on the East Coast, and got one in Texas, where I now live in an apartment. My current job will probably end in 6-9 months, so I am thinking about where to go next. I want to live in my Casita full-time in a place that doesn't have tornadoes. I was thinking of planning to move to Arizona or Nevada. I would need to work, so I imagine I could stay at a year-round RV park in my Casita, and drive to work at a nearby city. Probably Phoenix or Las Vegas, since I work in IT. My RV has A/C, and I would treat it like a little mobile apartment. I originally got it so I could save money on rent, and assume AZ/NV campgrounds are similarly cheaper than AZ/NV apartments. If I go to AZ/NV, I wont have to worry about ice/snow, and I can get rid of a lot of my snow survival gear. Less is better! Any reason I may not want to go to AZ/NV?
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:11 PM   #2
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Any reason I may not want to go to AZ/NV?
If you like semi desert with generally dry weather. And you don't mind hot summers with low humidity, you're good to go.

You also get wonderful monsoon rains, fantastic views for endless miles, no crowds outside of the larger areas like Las Vegas and Phoenix. Down to earth people. Unlimited camping opportunities with lakes, rivers and mountains. Etc, etc.

If you want it a bit cooler, with easy access to Yosemite and the fantastic Eastern Sierra, go north to Carson City.

What's not to like?
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:20 PM   #3
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June - August anywhere below about 5000í is going to be pretty hot for RV living in Arizona, even with A/C, in a thinly insulated camper like a Casita. That covers about 2/3 of the state, including the Phoenix and Tucson metro areas. If you can park your rig at a higher elevation and telecommute... perfect.

Arizona has great RV weather twelve months of the year, provided youíre mobile.
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:25 PM   #4
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June - August anywhere below about 5000í is going to be pretty hot for RV living in Arizona, even with A/C, in a thinly insulated camper like a Casita. That covers about 2/3 of the state, including the Phoenix and Tucson metro areas. If you can park your rig at a higher elevation and telecommute... perfect.

Arizona has great RV weather twelve months of the year, provided youíre mobile.
Is it realistic to stay at a campground close to Phoenix during the 9 cooler months, and commute from a more elevated campground during the 3 hottest months? Or maybe there are no elevated campgrounds anywhere near Phoenix. What would be a cooler city to live in, everyone mentions Flagstaff - are there others?
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:26 PM   #5
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If you like semi desert with generally dry weather. And you don't mind hot summers with low humidity, you're good to go.

You also get wonderful monsoon rains, fantastic views for endless miles, no crowds outside of the larger areas like Las Vegas and Phoenix. Down to earth people. Unlimited camping opportunities with lakes, rivers and mountains. Etc, etc.

If you want it a bit cooler, with easy access to Yosemite and the fantastic Eastern Sierra, go north to Carson City.

What's not to like?
That all sounds great!
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Old 08-22-2019, 01:31 AM   #6
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the greater Reno area is hard to beat. thats where my son has been living these past 4-5 years. Carson City is kinda on the Tahoe side of Reno IMHO. hah hah.

winters can be damn cold.
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Old 08-22-2019, 02:04 AM   #7
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We're in Smith Valley. It's just great to be able to go to Tahoe for lunch. North to Reno, or south to Yosemite and the whole Eastern Sierra so easily. Death Valley in about three hours. I never get tired of it after living in the Bay Area for 40 years. While driving on 395 and passing near here, in my 20s, on the way to LA from Reno, and back, I always thought it was too quiet for me. Not enough action. Now, that's just how I like it. Lots of high desert thundershowers in the summer, are just icing on the cake.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:52 AM   #8
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Live FT in RV in AZ or NV?

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Originally Posted by whoot View Post
Is it realistic to stay at a campground close to Phoenix during the 9 cooler months, and commute from a more elevated campground during the 3 hottest months? Or maybe there are no elevated campgrounds anywhere near Phoenix. What would be a cooler city to live in, everyone mentions Flagstaff - are there others?
Flagstaff is the only larger town (or small city) at a high elevation. It has the opposite problem for RV living: too cold in winter. High cost of living, terrible traffic, but fun college town.

Prescott is a mid-altitude large town that could allow year-round RV living. Donít know about employment opportunities. Large retiree population.

Commuting during summer... Payson is a livable summer elevation about a hour plus from the eastern suburbs of Phoenix (Mesa, Tempe, Chandler). Chandler is the tech hub. Long but easy drive on a good four-lane highway.

Donít know as much about Tucson area.
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:17 AM   #9
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Why do you want to live in your Casita? Just for the cool factor? To save money?

I get wanting to live in a camper. But the RV park thing, not so much. More crowded than an apartment building with less privacy. And even where I live, in a small ranching community of 5,000 people, it would be around $400/month to live in an RV park. I love living out of my camper, by I'm not paying $400/month to do it.

Your reasons are your reasons and your decision doesn't need to make sense. You can do something just cause you want to and that's cool. But do it with open eyes. RV parks cost at a minimum typically $50/night with hookups. Places which allow monthly rentals may give a discount, but you can do the math. For those costs, why not spread out in an apartment and save gas money and time commuting? For me, no moderate savings in rent is worth 2 hours of my time every day commuting that I can never get back.

Right now I pay nothing to live in my camper in the summer, and make some money on the side house sitting. But I do track my gas expenses. Luckily the farthest out of town I have to camp is 20 miles, down a 70mph road where the traffic that annoys me is if I actually see more than 10 cars. Or get stuck behind a tractor. And my job has no set hours, so I'm not rushing out of the camper at 7am every morning. I can relax, take my time, catch up on emails in the camper before heading in to the office etc.

Anyway, I really like when people start thinking like you. But I don't see the benefit of paying $5-900/month or so in rent to live in a tiny, tiny space surrounded by people 15 feet away, driving 40 miles each way to work. I have to question the motive. If it's just for the experience of the thing, fine. But it doesn't sound like it would save a ton of money, and to be honest the quality of life sounds like a step down.
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Old 08-22-2019, 10:15 AM   #10
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Showlow seemed just right to me, as did Payson. Showlow is higher elevation and has winter. Payson is where we stopped in the winter and changed into summery clothing when going down to The Valley to shop in the winter.

I lived for a couple years "up on the rim". Our population tripled in the summer. I enjoyed the less populated time of year. I lived in Overgaard. We got snow in the winter, but it usually melted quickly. Cold nights with days above freezing was the way winter worked there.

You still have to deal with thunderstorms starting in July. No tornados but tree tops can be blown to pieces by a lightning strike.

It was excellent country for mountain biking.

Being a PNW native, I found the lack of natural lakes to be a problem.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:46 PM   #11
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Why do you want to live in your Casita? Just for the cool factor? To save money?

I get wanting to live in a camper. But the RV park thing, not so much. More crowded than an apartment building with less privacy. And even where I live, in a small ranching community of 5,000 people, it would be around $400/month to live in an RV park. I love living out of my camper, by I'm not paying $400/month to do it.

Your reasons are your reasons and your decision doesn't need to make sense. You can do something just cause you want to and that's cool. But do it with open eyes. RV parks cost at a minimum typically $50/night with hookups. Places which allow monthly rentals may give a discount, but you can do the math. For those costs, why not spread out in an apartment and save gas money and time commuting? For me, no moderate savings in rent is worth 2 hours of my time every day commuting that I can never get back.

Right now I pay nothing to live in my camper in the summer, and make some money on the side house sitting. But I do track my gas expenses. Luckily the farthest out of town I have to camp is 20 miles, down a 70mph road where the traffic that annoys me is if I actually see more than 10 cars. Or get stuck behind a tractor. And my job has no set hours, so I'm not rushing out of the camper at 7am every morning. I can relax, take my time, catch up on emails in the camper before heading in to the office etc.

Anyway, I really like when people start thinking like you. But I don't see the benefit of paying $5-900/month or so in rent to live in a tiny, tiny space surrounded by people 15 feet away, driving 40 miles each way to work. I have to question the motive. If it's just for the experience of the thing, fine. But it doesn't sound like it would save a ton of money, and to be honest the quality of life sounds like a step down.
Your many questions make a lot of assumptions that I do not agree with, and will not argue about. I will say that living in my RV allows me the most freedom about choosing who my neighbors are, and how long I have to live next to them. I also save easily $10k a year versus an apartment, which was like getting a free Casita after 2 years. The small size also creates a self-regulating lifestyle that prevents me from buying too much crap. Those are the main reasons.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:57 PM   #12
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Showlow seemed just right to me, as did Payson. Showlow is higher elevation and has winter. Payson is where we stopped in the winter and changed into summery clothing when going down to The Valley to shop in the winter.

I lived for a couple years "up on the rim". Our population tripled in the summer. I enjoyed the less populated time of year. I lived in Overgaard. We got snow in the winter, but it usually melted quickly. Cold nights with days above freezing was the way winter worked there.

You still have to deal with thunderstorms starting in July. No tornados but tree tops can be blown to pieces by a lightning strike.

It was excellent country for mountain biking.

Being a PNW native, I found the lack of natural lakes to be a problem.
Thanks, I will check out those places. I lived in Portland for 1 year, when they had a drought, there was almost no rain. After I left, it rained for like 6 month, lol.
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Old 08-22-2019, 06:19 PM   #13
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Your many questions make a lot of assumptions that I do not agree with, and will not argue about. I will say that living in my RV allows me the most freedom about choosing who my neighbors are, and how long I have to live next to them. I also save easily $10k a year versus an apartment, which was like getting a free Casita after 2 years. The small size also creates a self-regulating lifestyle that prevents me from buying too much crap. Those are the main reasons.
Similar to living on a boat, which I did for many years. It offers benefits that some appreciate and some don't understand.

Some do it just to save money and some do it because of the freedom and lifestyle.

With my first boat, it was all about freedom and lifestyle. And I had a very good run with it. Sailed thousands of miles and had a fun place to live close to where I needed to be for work. Even went to Mexico for six months.

Second boat was all about convenience, where I lived about 5 hours away from where I worked. I came down about once a week and stayed on the boat. In that case, I was moored for about $400. per month with all utilities, pool, spa, workout room, etc. And surrounded with apartments with rents that started at about $5,000. per month. I could be gone for months if I wanted to, or just go out for the weekend.

Having a house in a large city, and not being there all the time, can be a problem. But having one in the country, if designed right, can simply become a home base that is fine left alone for months. That opens the door to all the travel one might want, while having some roots at the same time, or always having a place to come home to. And a place for a nice shop and a place to have more stuff, if desired. This is the situation where having a fun travel trailer is really nice.
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Old 08-22-2019, 07:34 PM   #14
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Similar to living on a boat, which I did for many years. It offers benefits that some appreciate and some don't understand.

Some do it just to save money and some do it because of the freedom and lifestyle.

With my first boat, it was all about freedom and lifestyle. And I had a very good run with it. Sailed thousands of miles and had a fun place to live close to where I needed to be for work. Even went to Mexico for six months.

Second boat was all about convenience, where I lived about 5 hours away from where I worked. I came down about once a week and stayed on the boat. In that case, I was moored for about $400. per month with all utilities, pool, spa, workout room, etc. And surrounded with apartments with rents that started at about $5,000. per month. I could be gone for months if I wanted to, or just go out for the weekend.

Having a house in a large city, and not being there all the time, can be a problem. But having one in the country, if designed right, can simply become a home base that is fine left alone for months. That opens the door to all the travel one might want, while having some roots at the same time, or always having a place to come home to. And a place for a nice shop and a place to have more stuff, if desired. This is the situation where having a fun travel trailer is really nice.
I currently have a pickup truck as my TV, but I plan to get sturdy cargo van - which I can also stealthcamp in. That will allow be to bring my RV to places I want to stay at, and just travel in the van when I just want to take a quick trip. I see the van as my 1-5 day home, and the RV as the 6+ day home. There is guy named Rusty78609 on YT that buys little house-less lots, and moves between them every few months. He drycamps in his Casita. He has a lot in TX and one in NM right now. He also sells the lots when the go up in value, so they serve as a source of income. If I had an internet-based job I would do the same. Here is his NM lot:
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