New? Are you full timing on Social Security? - Page 6 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-01-2015, 03:27 PM   #71
Senior Member
 
kirkman's Avatar
 
Name: Jason
Trailer: 2007 Eggcamper & Homemade Tear Drop
New York
Posts: 656
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scamper Jim View Post
On the other hand, hereís a real money saver. You can deduct for funeral costs if you expire in Florida; your neighbors in the RV park can just have the gators take care of the carcass. If it happens in Arizona, they can just set you out next to a cactus and the coyotes will pick the carcass clean in no time. OR, if you time it right and expire at Burning Man, you may be able to get a free cremation.

No fuss, no muss and it saves the cost of air freight to ship your sorry bones back to plant you in the ground!

Hey, you donít have to thank me, Iím just trying to help make the numbers work for you

Now you're thinking! LOL


Sent from my iPhone using Fiberglass RV
__________________

__________________
Jason
If you think you are to small to make a difference just try sleeping with a mosquito Ė- The Dally Lama
kirkman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 04:14 PM   #72
Senior Member
 
Name: Barb
Trailer: Trillium Outback 2004
British Columbia
Posts: 118
Registry
Low Cost Parks/Perks in Canada

Quote:
Originally Posted by A Storgard View Post
As I indicated before, we will soon be full timers if all goes according to plan. We have already needed to revise our itinerary as a result of the Cdn dollar value. I have noticed that most people posting are from the U.S.A., Are there any Canadian full timers that can give insight into lower cost parks/and perks we could take advantage of in Canada?
I enjoy reading everyone's posts. keep it up ��
Just returned from 3 months on the road in B.C., Yukon & Northwest Territories. I have a Good Sam membership but found that even with that there were less expensive options, and often there were no Good Sam Parks in the places we were traveling.

In B.C. there is free camping at the B.C. Recreation Sites which are listed on the BC government website. The odd popular site with a camp host charges $15/night. We stayed in as many Rec. Sites as possible although it took some planning as some are quite a ways off the main road via old Forest Service/Logging roads. Others quite close. They often have access that is really only feasible for small rigs - single lane road and small sites. A picnic table and outhouse are what you get for amenities. All were on either a lake or river and more often than not were empty or maybe one other camper. Maximum 14 day stay. Of all of them there was only one that we were unable to access as the sites were too 'lumpy' for the clearances on my Trillium Outback.

In the Yukon there were lots of Territorial Campgrounds that charged $15/night which included free firewood but no other services. Many of the campgrounds in NWT were operated by the local native band. One even had showers and flush toilets for $10/night. It was operated with a generator that automatically turned off at 9:00 pm at night and re-started at 7:00 am so planning your visits was beneficial.

We did come across many boondocking sites we could have used but they didn't always turn up when we needed one. We used the Backroad Map Books as our bible for finding out where the roads were going. There will be one published for the Yukon in 2016. If you access these map books just make sure you purchase the latest edition. We met folks attempting to navigate with older editions and things had changed, eg. road closures, extensions, surface changes.

We camped in Provincial Parks in B.C. where most of them have no services but will have a standpipe for access to running water although not always potable.

We decided not to take the Porta-Pottie and that actually made life easier. We had no problems finding facilities here and there.

We also used lots of solar lamps even though I've changed all the trailer lights to LED. Also have a 120W portable solar panel that basically kept the 12V fridge running. Only once after 3 days of cloud did we have to find a campsite with power to charge up the batteries.

Just go and try it out. After the initial break-in period you'll get into a routine so it becomes much more enjoyable.
__________________

__________________
BarbinBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 05:29 PM   #73
Junior Member
 
Name: debandsue
Trailer: Casita 17' SD
Texas
Posts: 6
Being desert divas the NWT do not sound like our cup of tea. But how totally great for you. And we are in complete agrement that you get into a routine that is enjoyable.

There are more than 3 flavors of ice cream and more than 3 ways to enjoy/fulltime in our delightful eggs (including with limited resources).

Sent from my GT-N5110 using Fiberglass RV mobile app
__________________
debandsue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 11:27 PM   #74
Senior Member
 
Name: Barb
Trailer: Trillium Outback 2004
British Columbia
Posts: 118
Registry
But the Arctic is a desert! Dry, sunny and there is sand in places. Maybe not as hot though, although I found Inuvik too hot in July!

Safe journeys, wherever you go, ice cream or not...
__________________
BarbinBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 10:04 AM   #75
Senior Member
 
Bill Nolen's Avatar
 
Name: Bill
Trailer: Had Scamp 13', want another small trailer.
Oklahoma
Posts: 617
Registry
US States that collect taxes on SS?

I just read this article, and thought it was on topic.

Which States Tax Social Security? - DailyFinance

Bill
__________________
Bill Nolen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 11:14 AM   #76
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
You have to be able to read between the lines when comparing tax loads for those living on retirement incomes.


For example, an article from Kiplinger's appeared today with the following statement about the 15 least friendly states to retire:
#7 California
State Income Tax: 1% (on income up to $7,749/individual, $15,498/joint) to 13.3% (on income above $1,000,000/individual, $1,039,374/joint)...


They left out that the state income tax was on "Taxable Income". After allowed deductions my state income tax load for 2014 was "ZERO" on a total income of about $40,000.


Elsewhere Kiplinger's mention that California residents pay the highest income taxes, in this article they modified that to say:


"That's significant, because wealthier residents of the Golden State pay the highest state income taxes in the U.S." (Do we think that they really care?)

And about property taxes:
In California property taxes are based on 1% of sales price + no more than a 2% increase per year and, in the case of a few new subdivisions, a "Mello-Roos" added tax, usually to pay for the cost of bringing a subdivision up to local incorporation standards, while still keeping a lower selling price. (i.e., pay now or pay later)


While the example they gave for property taxes: "The median property tax on the state's median home value of $373,100 is $3,015", is less than 1% (due to prop 13) my home of the past 14 years has a slightly higher value, but has an annual tax bill of a little under $2000. Now, if one moved to CA today and bought that "median" house, the property taxes would reset to $3,731.


Several years ago we looked at the possibility of moving to a "retirement friendly" state and found that the actual spread in tax load, when comparing apples to apples, wasn't worth the locations in which you had to live.... Alaska, Wyoming, Nevada, Florida, etc. vs. California, not on a bet.


Bottom line: If you are wanting to select a state to live in or declare as your home state, look beyond the flash of "Top & Bottom 10" lists and do all the math yourself first to see how it applies to you.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 12:00 PM   #77
Senior Member
 
Bill Nolen's Avatar
 
Name: Bill
Trailer: Had Scamp 13', want another small trailer.
Oklahoma
Posts: 617
Registry
There are no doubt several ways to "full-time on Social Security".

One is to live in a RV in a fixed location, such as a RV Campground/Resort. Or perhaps one of your children's backyard!

Another is to travel the highways and byways of American, Canada, and/or Mexico without a fixed physical home location.

To maximize SS funds, it would seem that a person, who was actually traveling full time, would want to establish resident in a State that didn't tax SS, or have a state income tax.

There are several ways to do this that are detailed in the back sections of RV Travel Magazines.

Bill
__________________
Bill Nolen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 12:16 PM   #78
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Again, taxing SS or having a state income tax does not mean that a retiree will ever have to pay any of those taxes. After dedications, SS income often falls well below the taxable income threshold.


For those with high SS benefits, and/or other income streams, the story can be different, but with just average SS, it's usually not enough of an issue.


In plain talk, "You can't be given a wedgie if you are going Commando". LOL
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 12:17 PM   #79
Senior Member
 
Jon Vermilye's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21
Oswego, NY
Posts: 1,407
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
You have to be able to read between the lines when comparing tax loads for those living on retirement incomes.


For example, an article from Kiplinger's appeared today with the following statement about the 15 least friendly states to retire:
#7 California
State Income Tax: 1% (on income up to $7,749/individual, $15,498/joint) to 13.3% (on income above $1,000,000/individual, $1,039,374/joint)...


They left out that the state income tax was on "Taxable Income". After allowed deductions my state income tax load for 2014 was "ZERO" on a total income of about $40,000.


Elsewhere Kiplinger's mention that California residents pay the highest income taxes, in this article they modified that to say:


"That's significant, because wealthier residents of the Golden State pay the highest state income taxes in the U.S." (Do we think that they really care?)

And about property taxes:
In California property taxes are based on 1% of sales price + no more than a 2% increase per year and, in the case of a few new subdivisions, a "Mello-Roos" added tax, usually to pay for the cost of bringing a subdivision up to local incorporation standards, while still keeping a lower selling price. (i.e., pay now or pay later)


While the example they gave for property taxes: "The median property tax on the state's median home value of $373,100 is $3,015", is less than 1% (due to prop 13) my home of the past 14 years has a slightly higher value, but has an annual tax bill of a little under $2000. Now, if one moved to CA today and bought that "median" house, the property taxes would reset to $3,731.


Several years ago we looked at the possibility of moving to a "retirement friendly" state and found that the actual spread in tax load, when comparing apples to apples, wasn't worth the locations in which you had to live.... Alaska, Wyoming, Nevada, Florida, etc. vs. California, not on a bet.


Bottom line: If you are wanting to select a state to live in or declare as your home state, look beyond the flash of "Top & Bottom 10" lists and do all the math yourself first to see how it applies to you.
Completely agree - you have to consider your exact circumstances. I'm a resident of NY, a high tax state, however I'm retired from teaching at a NY state college. They do not tax either my retirement or Social Security income; I even get a reduction in my property tax as a Viet Nam vet as well as NY's STAR program, a school tax reduction based in age.
Jon Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 01:33 PM   #80
Senior Member
 
Name: None
Trailer: None
None
Posts: 2,730
We have 5 children and 11 grandchildren who all live within 5 miles of our home .Moving
somewhere to save a couple of bucks in taxes seems like a poor bargain to me.
Family trumps money anyday in my book.
__________________
steve dunham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 02:54 PM   #81
Senior Member
 
honda03842's Avatar
 
Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
Posts: 7,300
Steve,

I doubt I'd move to save money but I might choose to have a domicile state without taxes. As to grand kids, the fact that we live in NH or FL did not stop me from spending time with the grandkids.

This thread is a person considering fulltiming so choosing a domicile state could be significant .... or not.
__________________
Norm and Ginny

2014 Honda Odyssey
1991 Scamp 16
honda03842 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2016, 05:24 PM   #82
Junior Member
 
Name: Lori
Trailer: In the market
Maryland
Posts: 10
I will qualify my reply by saying that I haven't read the entire thread (woo doggie, it's a long one - and I intend to read all of it) and it seems like the topic hasn't been active for a while. However...

I'm 61 and I will be among those who will be full-timing it on SS. I'm single so there will be no double SS. Just me, myself and I...and my dog. The reason I fell upon RVing was because I was looking for retirement options. I know myself and just could not see me sharing a house with a bunch of strangers (option 1) or marrying a sugar daddy (option2). So I had to look at inexpensive alternatives. I am not even sure how I came across RVing as an alternative in my search but as soon as I did I exclaimed (outloud, I'm sure) "This is it!" I've always been an adventurous, go against the grain, outdoorsy sort and since my family is spread across the west, it spoke to me.

I've been researching everything I could get my hands on both about full-time RVing and about living on SS. I happen to live in an expensive part of the country. Housing is expensive. Utilities are expensive in the winter and the summer (we don't get much of a break weather-wise). Food is expensive. Fuel is expensive. The only thing that costs nothing is political opinion...but I guess that's true anywhere in the country.

I don't have much in savings thanks partially to being a single mom for most of my 2 sons' lives, some health issues along the way and also, quite honestly, to some poor decisions on my part.

My plan is to take what I do have in saving to buy a light weight FGRV and my tow vehicle, retire at 65 after establishing Medicare coverage, continuing to work while on the road (I moonlight as a web designer) and then start taking SS when I'm 66. I know how much my SS will be. I wouldn't mind doing some workamping if I have to but I prefer to be able to pick up and go when the mood strikes so I'm not sure about that. I will consider it if I have to. But I am feeling confident that between SS and picking up a web dev/design job or two, I will be able to live a very comfortable existence....on my terms. And that's what it is all about, right?
__________________
rvdevdiva is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2016, 06:22 PM   #83
Senior Member
 
Borrego Dave's Avatar
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: Casita SD17 2006
California
Posts: 2,920
Camp hosting may be an option for you also.
__________________
Borrego Dave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2016, 07:33 PM   #84
Senior Member
 
Bill Nolen's Avatar
 
Name: Bill
Trailer: Had Scamp 13', want another small trailer.
Oklahoma
Posts: 617
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by rvdevdiva View Post
I will qualify my reply by saying that I haven't read the entire thread (woo doggie, it's a long one - and I intend to read all of it) and it seems like the topic hasn't been active for a while. However...

.... But I am feeling confident that between SS and picking up a web dev/design job or two, I will be able to live a very comfortable existence....on my terms. And that's what it is all about, right?
rvediva, I have been retired for a long, long, long time! Partly on SS, and part time work, and other income.

The one most important thing that I have learned along the way, is that a person's attitude is the the key to having a happy retired life.

I'd say, from reading you message, that you have the right positive attitude to make it work for you!

Bill
__________________

__________________
Bill Nolen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Full timing on social security? kirkman Fulltiming in a Molded Fiberglass Trailer 32 11-28-2015 08:40 AM
Full Timing "Great New Opportunities" Joy A Fulltiming in a Molded Fiberglass Trailer 13 10-12-2015 05:21 PM
What lessons have you learned full-timing? CynicalSailor Fulltiming in a Molded Fiberglass Trailer 39 08-05-2015 03:09 PM
Social Security Only - Nomadic Retirement offroad General Chat 7 03-20-2014 08:02 AM

» Trailer Showcase

Tiffany

Meghan

P-eggy

itlives
» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.