what about food? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-02-2013, 02:21 AM   #29
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We bring a special kind of milk that does not need refrigerating until opened and if kept cold lasts a week but gets finished off long before that. we would chill it just before drinking and then store it in the fridge for a day or two until finished. I don't remember the details but it works great when sailing offshore for breakfast cereal. The taste is a little different but not bad. I have never studied the labels but it tastes good and never turns bad it seems. We seem to run out and never bring enough--if it tasted bad it would not disappear so fast. The containers are box shaped and hold about a quart--another reason they go fast.
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Old 02-02-2013, 10:13 AM   #30
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We bring a special kind of milk that does not need refrigerating until opened and if kept cold lasts a week but gets finished off long before that.
Have used the same while kayaking. Its sold at most Canadian Safeways in 950ml or so, tetra packages & found in the dry goods section. There are actually starting to be more options in that regard - Non Dairy Beverages that taste a lot like the real thing but are Soy & Lactose Fee - that also doesnt need refrigerating until open and lasts a week once open.
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:44 PM   #31
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As to milk, there are a few powdered dry milk products that actually taste good. They are composed of whole milk (with cream) as opposed to non-fat milk. Sorry, I do not know the brand names. In addition, almond and other "milks" come in box containers that stay fresh on the shelf until opened.
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:04 PM   #32
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I have never noticed it in our local stores but in Newfoundland and Labrador we found liters of milk with extreme shelf lifes, I believe over a year. We bought on on our trip for emergency backup.

As to food storage, one of our favorite treat foods is smoked salmon. We usually have 4 - 8oz packages of smoked salmon, each easily enough for a meal of pasta and salmon or salmon cakes or ..... They take no refrigeration and can be stored in all those waste spaces within a small trailer.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:13 PM   #33
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as a child i was allergic to dairy milk and was raised on things like almond milk. Of course back in the day my mom just put a bunch of raw almonds in the blender with some water and pinch of salt and we had milk! Nowadays you can by almond milk most anywhere. Our two adult kids were raised on almond milk and will grab it first if given the choice (more calcium and protein than cows milk and easier on the body for digestion.) You can find original flavor, vanilla (our fav) and chocolate (great in coffee!).

When we go camping we purchase a case of the "Silk" or "Almond Breeze" brands of found in most nice grocery chains or online in 8oz cartons. No refrigeration needed until opened. And tastes so good the 8oz will be long gone before needing to be chilled.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:28 PM   #34
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Hi all

I wish I had a review of this site before we went on a trip (6 weeks) thru Alberta and a round trip thru, Alaska, we had plenty of low priced canned foods; box after box.... A lot of which came back home with us after 10,000 miles. The 4runner had many plastic containers loaded up. Eating out for Salmon and Halibut, gave us a lot of unused stufffff.

Later Kenny
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:34 PM   #35
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... Eating out for Salmon and Halibut, gave us a lot of unused stufffff.
Sounds like you were roughing it. eye hate to see that happen to anyone!
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:03 PM   #36
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LOL Kenny you are so right, you never know what you will find on the road that looks way better than something out of the can or box in the trailer. When traveling the coast if you go down to any of the commercial fishing docks & usually buy something right off the boat.

Lots of small towns as well as big ones seem to have a farmers market at least once a week from spring to fall, that you can buy almost anything - home made breads, jams, meats etc.
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:10 PM   #37
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That is one of the things I love about a small trailer & refrigerator - you must buy locally & often. I've discovered all kinds of food I'd never have eaten if I had the same amount of storage I have at home (or in a large RV).
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:23 AM   #38
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My first Atlantic yacht delivery was a trip from Connecticut to Bermuda with 7 people and the on to St Thomas with a smaller crew of 4.

On the first leg, one fellow brought five bags of gear including five towels. There was no space to store all this stuff and I wanted to toss a few bags overboard.

Since then I have a lecture I give on footwear to people crewing for me.

I always believe in traveling light and I do that my limiting myself to two bags. Sailors need foul weather gear --that takes up one bag. It is important to have clothing for wet and cold conditions. Then there is the normal bag of clothes.

Sleeping bags: Unlike everyone else I do not bring a sleeping bag and never do on these trips. This applies to camping also. I prefer blankets, preferably synthetic. If it is cold I bring comforter. I'd rather bundle up in warm clothes and use a blanket. Two days out and into the Gulf Stream, it is shorts and T shirt weather--then a bag gets in the way for a week while a blanket becomes an under pad.

Clothes: I bring mostly quick dry clothes. I bring two LL Bean long sleeve button synthetic sun shirts that dry instantly and a couple of Under Armor type loose fitting short sleeve T shirts and one skin tight long sleeve for swimming in the islands and sun protection. I need to buy some SPF 90 sun pants... Instead i have been relying on sun screen and getting burned. I can wash a shirt in a sink in five minutes and put it on right away while still damp and let it dry on my back. Truthfully, I could get by with only one of those shirts as these are both durable, easy to wash in a sink, and fast drying. I bring two for a change. I am amazed how comfortable the loose fitting Under Armor T shirts are. I bought one on same for $7 and wish I bought more of them The tight fitting long sleeves are great as a base layer but not as insulating. I have a long sleeve zip up UA shirt with a pocket this I am using more and more. Warm rain is not an issue because everything dries fast. I also have one pair of quick dry shorts. And a pair of cotton shorts for dry conditions.

I also bring two pairs of light weight semi tight fitting synthetic sweat pants which I live in during cold weather. I just bought another thinner grade UA swear pant which get a lot of use. I find that cooler but more comfortabke than the heavier sweat pants. Two is a good number for these as they are harder to wash and it is easier to swap them after a few days. They make it very easy to slide into foul weather bibs or any top layer.

All compress well and doesn't look wrinkled when worn.

While I love cotton, they just get damp and smelly. If I bring these cloths they are mostly reserved for flying home. The just don't seem worthwhile but I still love cotton shorts and jeans and polo shirts.

Footwear: I bring comfy sandals for warm weather and waterproof Henry Llyod boots for cold weather. My HL boots are so comfortable I find that I wear the often. Best $300 I ever spent. I am thinking about buying a new pair and throwing out most of my other unused footwear. Sometimes I bring Crocs as they protect toes on deck and have enough flotation that I don't want to take them off to swim. I can't walk far in them though.

Socks: My heavy Seal Skin socks never stink really bad. I only had one pair while sailing off the coast of England for a week at a time. They were comfortable, and tough enough to wear by themselves with boots. They seemed to wick moisture away from my feet...I think that is why they never got very ripe. I washed them once a week-sounds gross, but they were miracle socks. I honestly think anyone could get by with only one pair of these socks. I bought two more pair for $90 and mistakenly got the taller waterproof ones. They were too hard to get on and off. The shorter normal sock height ones are fantastic. I plan to buy two more pair and start throwing out most of my cotton socks except for a few pair for dress up use. As a bonus they don't wear out. After three years of heavy use they no longer look new. I think they will last another five years.

Basically I am convinced that quick dry clothes and synthetics are the only sensible choices if it is wet or sweaty, when camping, traveling, biking, or anything active.

I use Patagonia Gore Tex outer-wear. Mine are no longer made but there is plenty to chose from. The sailors gear is the best quality I've found being design for repeated salt water exposure. The salt crystals are damaging to conventional Gore-Tex, so ocean rated material hold up better than common Gore-Tex.

By using these quick dry cloths I have bee able to travel lighter and remain independent of washing machines and dryers.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:46 AM   #39
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We bring a special kind of milk that does not need refrigerating until opened and if kept cold lasts a week but gets finished off long before that. we would chill it just before drinking and then store it in the fridge for a day or two until finished. I don't remember the details but it works great when sailing offshore for breakfast cereal. The taste is a little different but not bad. I have never studied the labels but it tastes good and never turns bad it seems. We seem to run out and never bring enough--if it tasted bad it would not disappear so fast. The containers are box shaped and hold about a quart--another reason they go fast.
The name of this product is "Silk" I beleive. Comes in a waxed box.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:57 AM   #40
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I pre-freeze all meat, hamburger in patties, even hot dogs. I put them in air tight freezer zip lock bags, then at the bottom of cooler. Lasts longer. Have planned to use half of meat product frozen then on another day when thawed use the other half in another dish. Example, Hamburgers one nite, then spaghetti on another nite.
If I have left over spaghetti sauce, then I put it into chili beans. Goes a long way like that. I take all dry goods out of their boxes, cereal, pancake mix, etc. and pack into zip locks, saves space. Hope this helps.
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Old 03-15-2013, 01:08 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Night Sailor View Post
Sleeping bags: Unlike everyone else I do not bring a sleeping bag and never do on these trips. This applies to camping also. I prefer blankets, preferably synthetic. If it is cold I bring comforter. I'd rather bundle up in warm clothes and use a blanket. Two days out and into the Gulf Stream, it is shorts and T shirt weather--then a bag gets in the way for a week while a blanket becomes an under pad.
My favorite substitute for a sleeping bag is a Poncho Liner. I first used one in Vietnam, and since then have purchased a bunch of them. They are light, keep you warm or even cool, and wash & dry easily. Very practical as an emergency blanket for the car, etc.
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Old 03-15-2013, 01:19 PM   #42
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+1 for the poncho liner. They also can be stuffed down to fanny pack size.
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