Winter RV choices - Fiberglass RV



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Old 04-02-2018, 09:08 PM   #1
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Name: Emily
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Minnesota
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Winter RV choices

Hi everyone, So we are selling our home and going to head out in an RV soon. Our son has been very sick with mold illness/Lyme, and many people with his condition have found tremendous health benefits in getting out into the clean air. Many have used all metal or fiberglass RVs since they have a low propensity to grow mold (for the most part).

We live in Minnesota and will be heading west to UT, NV, AZ but may need to return to Minnesota periodically. And the weather here is so wonky. (It's snowing right now.) I am leaning heavily toward getting a Bigfoot (saw a new 17.5 trailer for sale) or something like this.

What has your experience been in cold weather? Besides the Bigfoot and Oliver trailers, do you have any other recommendations or have you added insulation to make yours more winter friendly?
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Old 04-03-2018, 01:11 AM   #2
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Welcome to the FGRV forum family. We moved from Michigan to Phoenix Arizona 33 years ago, and never regreted it. If you are planning on wintering in this area, (higher elevations are much colder) and have access to electricity, you simply plug in a small electric heater, so any of the molded travel trailers would work for you. If you are staying at length, then you could wrap your water hose with a heat tape for the rare nights that may freeze an unprotected hose, or simply disconnect it for the night. Escape trailers can be ordered with extra insulation and double pane windows, so you could add them to your list of Oliver and Big Foot.
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Old 04-03-2018, 03:04 AM   #3
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I known while winter camping that the floor was the coldest spot on our older Boler so we put down those rubber mats you get at wall*mart and fit them tight (they interlock) and it made a lot of difference.
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Old 04-03-2018, 07:31 AM   #4
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Good ideas, thanks so much. I didn't know that about the Escapes! I will put them on my list!
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Old 04-03-2018, 07:47 AM   #5
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You might try a curtain (non plastic shower curtain) over your bed alcove to hold your body heat in a smaller area. Other winter camping tips- sleep in caps amd sox. Sleep in layers. 100% polyester fleece doesn't NEED to be polar tec to hold in heat. if you have something (straw bales?) to keep the wind out from underneath the camper that helps too.
Hoping you see some improvement in your son's condition.
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Old 04-03-2018, 08:58 AM   #6
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Welcome, Emily!

Are we talking about 3 people (you said "our son")? Sounds like you need a decent-sized double bed for two and a third single bunk, maybe. Many of these trailers are really meant for a couple. I mention that because the beds in some are surprisingly narrow. It's the sort of arrangement that may work for a weekend or a week's vacation, but perhaps not for longer-term use. Bigfoot 17.5 fits that category, I believe. You'll just have to try some on for size. Different people have different ideas about space.

Every choice has pros and cons. Plumbing leaks can happen in any trailer and support mold growth. On the other hand, the fiberglass shell minimizes the potential for leaks from outside. An all-fiberglass interior including the floor (Oliver) offers some advantages in being non-porous and easily cleanable, but even then, there are hidden spaces that can harbor mold. Bigfoot makes very solid, well-built trailers, but there's a lot of wood and places for mold to hide, including the wood subfloor. Escape also has a wood interior, but the subfloor is encased in fiberglass above and below with a "French drain" system around the outer perimeter, an advantage.

The Southwest is a great place to prevent mold from getting a foothold and keep things thoroughly dried out. We do have our share of other allergens, though- right now is juniper pollen season (sniffle, sniffle...).

Best wishes!
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Old 04-03-2018, 09:28 AM   #7
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There is an Escape 15A advertised for a great price right now. Only problem is it is in California. May not be big enough for you, but the beds look decent sized.
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Old 04-03-2018, 01:57 PM   #8
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Hi,
I moved with my family to Nevada when I was 13, I had terrible sinus issues. I was amazingly cured from the dry weather so Kudos for your love of your son you are exhibiting! Small air purifiers are great for his condition, electrostatic types are easily cleaned, very small and work wonders. Insulation made from what looks like aluminum foil sandwiched over bubble wrap is very cheap at local stores and easily cut to window size for keeping the cold out, especially if you are on a budget, usually only necessary at nite. God Bless and I wish your health. Fiberglass trailers are the best.
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Old 04-03-2018, 04:00 PM   #9
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Jon, thanks for the guidance on the structural differences between the various manufacturers. I'm amazed how much you all know about the differences between these trailers.

Thanks everyone, I appreciate the advise and observations.
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Old 04-04-2018, 12:22 PM   #10
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Name: kanga
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You'd think being Scamp is in northern Minn. they'd offer an insulation package Sounds like a canada make is the only option. or you can just get a casita, scamp etc and a few rolls of reflectix to winterize yourself. We lived in an old 13' scamp like that year round, mostly off grid.
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Old 04-04-2018, 01:50 PM   #11
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Winter RV choices

I'd say there are several reasons Scamp has never attempted a "winter package," Hiker22. One, insulation is primarily a function of thickness, and Scamp's products don't have much of that to spare. Two, it adds to cost and weight, especially when you include thermal windows and enclosed, heated holding tanks, and Scamp is about value and low weight. Three, the large majority of buyers only intend to camp when and where the weather is mild.

That's why they have wheels...

Trying to be all things to all people has derailed more than a few good companies.
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Old 04-04-2018, 03:26 PM   #12
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Myself if cost is no object, then Oliver is tough to beat for four season camping. Plan on a serious tow vehicle. Bigfoot is heavy too.our friends four season motorhime froze up last winter as in their case it takes a lot of propane to keep the water tanks and piping warm.

There are some rally good YouTube videos on winter camping. People add temporary skirting and some heat under the trailer to help. Then you have the water hook up.

FG trailers are incredibly small. Most are narrower than conventional trailers, length is measured end to end, from the trailer tongue to the spare tire on the back. So a 17 foot trailer may only have a body that is 13 feet long.

Oliver is made in the USA.
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