Would you ever consider stick built for Full Time? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-04-2015, 11:44 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
And that David Brown is the same guy that gave us the (Aston Martin) DB series without which James Bond would have had to use a Raleigh (bicycle that is)


And Italian tractor maker, Mr. Lamborghini, also gave us some eye candy as well. When Enzo F. wouldn't build him a car the way he wanted it built, he built it himself. Rake and backhoe attachments were optional.
__________________

__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 11:58 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
honda03842's Avatar
 
Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
Posts: 7,300
Hyla Brook

By June our brook's run out of song and speed.
Sought for much after that, it will be found
Either to have gone groping underground
(And taken with it all the Hyla breed
That shouted in the mist a month ago,
Like ghost of sleigh-bells in a ghost of snow)--
Or flourished and come up in jewel-weed,
Weak foliage that is blown upon and bent
Even against the way its waters went.
Its bed is left a faded paper sheet
Of dead leaves stuck together by the heat--
A brook to none but who remember long.
This as it will be seen is other far
Than with brooks taken otherwhere in song.
We love the things we love for what they are.

--Robert Frost

Thanks Wendy Lee

I wrote to my grand niece today about the importance of learning something every day. Today Wendy's the teacher. Thank you.
__________________

__________________
Norm and Ginny

2014 Honda Odyssey
1991 Scamp 16
honda03842 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 12:12 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Name: Patrick
Trailer: R-Vision Trail Lite
New York
Posts: 592
My 15 year old stick built (the sticks are aluminum) has a roof that still looks like new. Never had a leak. The underside is 100% sealed in metal and the tanks are surrounded by the heating ducts in the insulated undercarriage. The exterior skin is fiberglass. The only maintenance I have encountered is standard stuff like bearing librication and replacing an awning that got removed by a major wind storm.

Any quality built product will last with proper care. I feel way too much is made by Fiberglass trailer owners of leaks and rot. I have been looking at these units for a possible future purchase. As I read this site I see plenty of posts about replacing rotten floors, leaking windows and other maintenance issues. Nothing man makes is perfect. As we RV owners bounce down the rough roads in Canada and the USA our travel trailers are subject to a real life beating. If we are lucky our rig will hold together. Our only defense is to do our homework on the manufacturer and what materials go into our toys. One thing is certain....there will be maintenance and repairs...that is life on the road.

Next comes cost. If you can afford to buy the best and buy new...great!
I always buy used. In order to do that and not buy into a lot of repair issues you must educate yourself. Life experiences go a long way in that education. I learn something new everyday. My RV education started in 1985 and is still ongoing.
This web site and several others is a great source for info on RVs and the lifestyle that goes along with it. In your search for the perfect travel trailer you will make some bad selections....sell and move on. Each time you come closer to that perfect layout that works for you.

When I find a FIberglass RV that works for us I'll let you know. Right now both supply and layouts that check all our boxes are in limited supply. The manufacturers have not made the process very easy. Their marketing leaves much to be desired. Hard to find any dealers. Don't see any at most popular RV shows. Their market penetration is such that even finding one used on Craigslist is all but impossible. Just spent two weeks camping and touring 4 States and only saw 3 fiberglass units on the road...saw thousands of stick built travel trailers and motor homes.

Happy Camping!
__________________
Uplander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 12:17 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
CampyTime's Avatar
 
Name: Wendy Lee
Trailer: Scamp 13' Standard
New York
Posts: 1,061
Registry
Thank you Norm. Frost is my most treasured poet. A wonderful teacher of mine in fifth grade began my life long love of his works.

And then there's you. You are my favorite writer of human truths in prose here on this site. If you could only see my face after reading many of your works, then you'd know how touched I am.


Sent from my iPhone using Fiberglass RV
__________________
CampyTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 01:07 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Name: Jan
Trailer: 1998 17' Burro
Arizona
Posts: 15
We have lived full-time in our 35' Bounder since 2001. Twelve months a year with no house other than our motor home. We have had absolutely no problem with our "home." We tow our jeep. Yes the gas mileage is low but as I've always said "It is the cost of doing business." I wouldn't trade it for anything. That being said....we did purchase a 17' Burro camper. The Burro is our camper for short trips and more rural stays. I love both my "home" and my "camper." Jan
__________________
janallanp is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 01:20 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Timber Wolf's Avatar
 
Name: Tim
Trailer: '88 Scamp 16, layout 4
North Florida
Posts: 1,440
To answer the question directly, no I would not consider a stick for full-time. To further explain though, I never considered full-timing UNTIL I bought the Scamp and started camping a lot more, and a lot more comfortably (ditching the tent). I started my RV search looking at what was plentiful and available, which were stickies. None felt, or looked quite right. Seams spreading, water damage, etc. I then looked at my future Scamp, then 26 years old. No real structural issues or leaks other than popped rivets. When I realized what the condition of the much newer stickies I had looked at was compared to the Scamp I was sold on FGRVs having seen only one. Now having owned and experienced a solid trailer I can contemplate full, or long timing.
__________________
Timber Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 01:23 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
honda03842's Avatar
 
Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
Posts: 7,300
Jan,

We had a 1997 Bounder 32H and loved it, traveling for 7 years all over NA. We unintentionally gave it up when we bought a small trailer "just for 2 month, I promise", to go across Labrador. At the end of the two months we smiled at each other and kept going for 8 more months and came home and sold the Bounder.
__________________
Norm and Ginny

2014 Honda Odyssey
1991 Scamp 16
honda03842 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 01:32 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Those trying to hype the advantages of non-molded FGRV's hereabouts are essentially trying to sell Fords on a Chevy site.


Yes, there will always be exceptions to the general rule of high maintenance on stickys, especially from those owners that can do their own preventive maintenance, and just happen to know which way to turn a screwdriver (You Know - lefty-loosey, righty-tighty). But for many (most?) sticky owners that must depend on outside "Professionals" to do repairs, a stack of repair bills can usually be found in their trailers portfolio and seems to be a selling point when offering them to buyers.


My local RV dealer is over booked right now with sticky repairs, many being for newly discovered leaks. While we hardly have more than a drop of rain a month in SoCal. So, when we do get a rainstorm, as we did a week ago, a whole new flock of leaky stickys heads for the repair shop. The service manager even knows to predict that, and brings on "Stringers" (occasionally including moi) to help with the extra work.


Again, exceptions do not make the rule.....
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 02:44 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
honda03842's Avatar
 
Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
Posts: 7,300
Exceptions do not make the rule but they show it's not absolute.... sort of like towing a Scamp 16 all over North America for 7 years.
__________________
Norm and Ginny

2014 Honda Odyssey
1991 Scamp 16
honda03842 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 03:08 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,142
If I were fulltiming and could not afford a FGRV but could afford a stick built, yes I'd buy a stickie.

If I needed a vehicle and could not afford a Lexus but could afford a Ford, yes I'd buy a Ford.

Better to have a less durable one than to have none at all.

I have owned 3 stick builts and 1 Burro. If you keep the seams sealed on the stickie, it will do reasonably well. Read up on Eternabond tape, good stuff for seams IMO.

Be sure to consider cost of operation. A MH will likely get 8 to 10 mpg. Towing a FG trailer you may get 14 to 16 mpg. Depending on how many miles you travel in a year, this might pay the difference.

But my advice is, wait at least another year and a half before buying anything, to see where the economy and society go.
__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 03:10 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Name: Jack L
Trailer: Bigfoot B-17 CB
Washington
Posts: 1,226
Some day I might get rid of my Bigfoot and try a Lazy Daze or similar quality motor home.
__________________
Jack L is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 03:25 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
The Minimalist's Avatar
 
Name: Clif
Trailer: 08 Weiscraft Little Joe 14 Subaru Outback 2.5i CVT
Louisiana
Posts: 724
Registry
We certainly are a diverse crowd here...............I LIKE it!
__________________
Clif
The Minimalist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 03:59 PM   #27
Junior Member
 
Name: Bryan
Trailer: Boler shopping
British Columbia
Posts: 7
I wouldn't buy a stick built personally , fiberglass is just better , if I needed something bigger than my 17' Boler I would look at an Airstream , they seem comparable to Glass trailers as far as weight and maintenance and they also have the "cool " factor .
__________________
AngryCrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2015, 04:36 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Name: Bryce
Trailer: Currently Browsing
Connecticut
Posts: 107
Airstream while styled very nice, seems rather expensive compared to stick built. But maybe the expense would be up front vs. longer term maintenance? I don't know enough. I also kind of like that FGRVs aren't that big... I don't want to purchase a huge tow vehicle or pay the gas!
__________________

__________________
Bster13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is this why we don't like stick-built? Ellpea in CA General Chat 12 06-22-2015 09:08 AM
This is why Stick Built trailers are different than all-molded towables Donna D. General Chat 15 01-30-2015 07:58 AM
A Stick Built Geographic ~ 6k Gina D. Classified Archives 4 09-12-2010 11:15 PM
OT: new trailer, stick built Ken C General Chat 13 09-19-2009 06:43 PM
OT: new stick built coming out Ken C General Chat 8 04-27-2009 05:33 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.