Would you ever consider stick built for Full Time? - Page 5 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-17-2015, 03:02 PM   #57
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Name: RogerDat
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Most of those not retired are only going to get to go camping for a few weekends and a couple of weeks +/- each year. Just different from full timing or folks that have more specific use cases such as say kayak or base camp for other activities which would see them using the RV more.

At least some of those are using the working years to pay for the camper they hope will be used during retirement for long trips, extensive travel or being snow bird full time. They look at the amenities often from a novice point of view or with expectations (dreams even) of how they will use it.

The boomers are going to drive the RV market for a bit longer me thinks. And of course manufactures (FG or stick built) aim for a price point, and a market segment. As said providing amenities consistent with the desires of that segment and the price folks will pay. Lot of discussion in the past about this and there is general agreement that even in the FG world different manufacturers are going primarily for different markets. Otherwise the "deluxe" of one would not be so close to 1/2 the price of another's main offering.
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Old 08-17-2015, 03:31 PM   #58
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RB's observations appear to be summer season (between Memorial Day and Labor Day). There's a difference between main camping season and other times of the year in who is occupy campgrounds and who is not.
From a lot of the people I've talked to the retired set does a lot of what we do. We occupy campgrounds during the work week in the summer season and vacate during the week-ends. Thus leaving the campgrounds to the families with children.
During the rest of the year we'll occupy campgrounds for a couple weeks to 30 days at a time. Usually heading south for the winter. Families have to make a living during our prime camping season.

Now as to size and shape of RVs, very few people travel with fiberglass trailers. Most of what you see are much bigger that my little 13' trailer any time of the year. For one thing I think most people that buy an RV just head for nearest dealer and buy what's on the lot. In the small trailer category I see more Rpods and T@B trailer than molded fiberglass. Therefore it appears that one of the determining factors is what's available locally.

There's lots of other factors involved in choosing the perfect RV. For us the 13' Scamp is perfect, at least at this time. For others not so perfect for several reasons. But that's OK, you have to go with what works well for you. I would advise anybody looking to buy an RV of any kind, stop and really evaluate what you need, then add in the wants before you buy. Where are going to going, what's the conditions like, what time of the year. Cold weather, warm weather, hot weather. RV resorts (any place with electricity) or boondocking (any place without electricity). All these thing need to be considered before thinking about build type.
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Old 08-17-2015, 03:42 PM   #59
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I think that a major factor for first-time RV buyers is that there are no dealerships for FGRV's, there are few in the used market, and all that are seen at the shows are the stickys. A newbie, basically, has top search out the FGRV's, the very special 1%er's of the RV market.
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Old 08-17-2015, 04:51 PM   #60
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I have a friend who has an exceptionally nice Sunline stick built that is about 10 years old. I don't know the model but it is 21' to 22'. I say "exceptionally nice" because she had it restored and professionally redid the interior after she bought it about three years ago and found some leak damage. It is in top condition mechanically, structurally and appearance wise. She full times and has found an older Titanium fifth wheel that she really likes but would need to sell the Sunline in the price range of around $8,000 to do the deal. Send me a pm if interested.
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:02 PM   #61
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Ummm there is the factor (somewhat circular) of because FGRV's hold their value folks will take bird dropping covered rats nest from next to a barn and restore it to clean, solid, functional camper. Thus putting another old FGRV on the road in such good shape that the value is high. This means old FGRV's go for high prices, which in turn makes the cost of restoring the next barn beauty discovered project shell worth it. And propping up the sale price of the of the shell off the frame restoration project "opportunities".

With an added bonus of having lots of retired skilled trades and professionals that become a knowledge base and resource for restoring the old ones. One thing that I will say a lot of FGRV owners KNOW their trailers construction. How it is built, what weaknesses or quirks it has, how it is wired, plumbed and constructed.
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:36 PM   #62
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The First...the Sunline Travel Trailer...great maker in its day...superior use of space with some great layouts...a leader in light weight trailers...Amish built product..went out of business when the economy went into the tank for our current never ending recession.

Second...the sticky trailer market for travel trailers is dominated by the current number one maker of travel trailers...JAYCO. This is one sharp company....they build travel trailers at all price/quality levels. Their lowest price point is a wood framed (2X3 wall studs) unit with aliminum sides and "rubber membrane type roof". As the price points increase the construction changes to aluminum welded stud construction, high quality fiberglass vacuum formed side panels (note this method is superior to what is called "pinch-roller" formed fiberglass panels).
At all price points you get all the creature comforts (this is where the fiberglass units miss the mark) including A/C, full bathrooms with real showers, well appointed Kitchens and slide outs for extra space. This is what impresses the first time buyers.

JAYCO trailers are also easy to find as the have an excellent dealer network.
They can be found at almost all RV Shows (unlike fiberglass travel trailers that are nearly impossible to find). That is why they are number one....simple marketing 101.

Fact is there are hundreds of thousands of satisfied sticky travel trailer owners out there. There would be more fiberglass travel trailers on the road today if they employed the same dealer networks and proven marketing techniques as the RV industry leaders.

As a retired Sales/Marketing professional the lack of dealer network and poor marketing by the fiberglass trailer manufacturers makes me crazy.

Like Jack Web used to say on Dragnet...."Just the facts, just the facts"
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:54 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce H View Post
I have a friend who has an exceptionally nice Sunline stick built that is about 10 years old. I don't know the model but it is 21' to 22'. I say "exceptionally nice" because she had it restored and professionally redid the interior after she bought it about three years ago and found some leak damage. It is in top condition mechanically, structurally and appearance wise. She full times and has found an older Titanium fifth wheel that she really likes but would need to sell the Sunline in the price range of around $8,000 to do the deal. Send me a pm if interested.
My condolences to your friend with the Sunline.
But this sorta makes the point about FGRV's vs. Sticky's that, after only 7 years the owner had to have it restored due to leaks and redid the interior. A 7 y.o. FGRV is, basically "Like New" and priced about the same as when new.
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Old 08-18-2015, 03:18 PM   #64
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Yes a dealer network is critical to sticky sales at all price points, especially when a large percentage of actual sales are made at 15-25% off of MSRP,s and there is still room for the dealer's commission and costs.


If FGRV makers wanted to work through a dealer network they would have to start by raising MSRP's by at least 50% so they too could be discounted and there still be room for dealer commissions and costs.


The owner of one of the largest Jayco dealerships in the United States is a personal friend of mine and we have discussed this often. He would like to have a line of FGRV's on his lot, but the $$$ just don't work for the marketplace.


BTW: When we bought a sticky for an ex-SIL, he pointed to a different brand than Jayco for us to buy.
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Old 08-20-2015, 12:01 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerDat View Post
Ummm there is the factor (somewhat circular) of because FGRV's hold their value folks will take bird dropping covered rats nest from next to a barn and restore it to clean, solid, functional camper. Thus putting another old FGRV on the road in such good shape that the value is high. This means old FGRV's go for high prices, which in turn makes the cost of restoring the next barn beauty discovered project shell worth it. And propping up the sale price of the of the shell off the frame restoration project "opportunities".

With an added bonus of having lots of retired skilled trades and professionals that become a knowledge base and resource for restoring the old ones. One thing that I will say a lot of FGRV owners KNOW their trailers construction. How it is built, what weaknesses or quirks it has, how it is wired, plumbed and constructed.
Our first trailer was a 12ft stickbuilt 1969 Thorobred. I spent nearly $1500 and several months doing the restoration. it was done in "Route 66" trim, even with matching luggage. People would stop by and compliment it even taking pictures. It was nicely done, everybody liked it(lots of lookers) and after several weeks I finally got a buyer.... For $1600.
I have not bothered with anything which wasn't fiberglass since!
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Old 08-27-2015, 06:59 PM   #66
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People always suggest that Newbies go to a rally to see the various trailers, certainly a good idea. More important is to meet people who are successful, to see what they are like as humans, to see how they look at each other. Are they still feasting on each other, do they smile when they look at their partner?
Norm and Ginny, my wife Kim and I found your post to be refreshing, heartfelt and so true. Your years happy together as well as your outlook is inspiring, thank you for your gift to many of us.

I know we are guilty of two foot-itis and forgetting what it is that really counts, sharing moments with one's partner and leaving all that stuff behind.

Upon retirement in the near future, we initially decided to trade the Scamp 13 for the spaciousness and a bath of an Escape 17. Well we soon found ourselves clamming for the 19 foot model. Then we convinced ourselves that only a 21 footer would make us comfortable and happy travelers. Before we start looking for a 35 foot something or other your advice reminded us of priorities. Kim and I are re-evaluating our needs a lot more thinking about what really matters as we will travel a lot more after retirement. As you wrote, it's us not the length of the camper, but the campers inside that matters.

There is beauty in simplicity and I know we have greatly enjoyed the advantages of a smaller trailer that outweighs giving up having a California King size bed, a larger galley, etc. We have been happy with 13 feet and no bath, 17 feet is still a good compromise, maneuverable, easy to drop off in undeveloped sites and as we have been realizing lately, will be as easy to park at home.

I think that if we decide to become full timers one day, a few more feet would be nice. For now we are reversing ourselves as we plan the purchase of our ideal retirement trailer, the one we will use as we enter old age. Your advice came just in time before we talk ourselves into a 35 foot behemoth.

Thank you for your post.
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Old 08-27-2015, 08:16 PM   #67
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Santiago and Kim,

There's a best size for everyone. My suggestion would be that bouncing between sizes is fine if you have time to spend on regularly reconfiguring your trailer and of course the funds to do it. Very often it's not just changing your trailer but also changing your tow vehicle.

It's best to target what you need and/or want.

We're satisfied where we are in our Scamp. The reality we've been satisfied in every RV even our 32 foot RV. I'm reading a book An Imperfect Life, she frequently write of the internal journey. The more I think about our extended RVing it's all so much more than the rig... though there's no harm in being comfortable.

As to a King bed, in northern Maine the suggestion of a king bed would be grounds for divorce. All that space must mean you want multiple partners, which may be OK but not all at once. (Seriously I love northern Maine and they are wonderful people.)
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Old 08-27-2015, 08:21 PM   #68
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Norm and Ginny, I like your sense of humor.
We don't own a King size bed so I guess our marriage is safe for now ; > )
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Old 08-27-2015, 09:16 PM   #69
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Norm's posts are truly one of the delights of this forum for me for the truths about life they provide. We all can get caught up in the trappings of the world. Even if you consider yourself a non-materialistic person, it's hard to not be affected by "stuff" or occasionally pine for things.

To know the love that Norm and Ginny share is pinnacle to that, and they are blessed to have each other. They have found happiness in each other and everything else is a tributary to that first most important body of water.

Whatever trailer you decide upon, don't worry what others think. I believe that the trailer we are happiest with is the one that is an expression of the love we have for ourselves. It makes you smile. In my case as a single gal, I yearn to live that expression with another human being. But I still wake up in my 10 feet of space inside my scamp and feel like the luckiest girl in the world. To those of you with husbands/wives, the relationship that you nurture will find fruition in a trailer just perfect for you.

If it ends up being a 32 foot behemoth as you say, then so be it! Enjoy! When I walk my dog and an older couple is sitting in front of one of those $200,000+ motor homes or what have you, and they're holding hands or reading the paper together over their mornings coffee, I think to myself...now that's precious.


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Old 08-27-2015, 10:43 PM   #70
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I started out with a stick 18 years ago. Went through a truck camper, tag along, three 5ers, two FG and now back to a stick 24' 5er. FG difinantly hold their value but sticks just plain have more room. If you have a storage to keep a stick in it will last but does loose value. We simply went back to a stick because we are planning to do some camp ground hosting and just needed more room and storage. It's not what you camp in its that you enjoy the camping experience.
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