1979 Burro - Electric brakes - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-07-2007, 08:41 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Myron Leski's Avatar
 
Name: Myron
Trailer: 19' Escape
NM
Posts: 664
Registry
Here's what I saw when I removed the wheel hub of my '81 13ft Burro. I chose not to do anything about the brakes on mine because I thought they were a luxury, plus, had too many other issues to deal with. Had snipped wiring similar to yours. However I did replace both bearings with new. So far, after a couple years, have not felt a need to re-install brakes. My tow, a '92 Explorer, handles things quite well.

As for the other wiring....well, a picture is worth a thousand words.
Attached Thumbnails
brakes2.jpg   oldwiring.jpg  

__________________

__________________
Myron Leski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 09:14 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
pjanits's Avatar
 
Name: Pete
Trailer: 17 ft 1986 Burro
Tennessee
Posts: 881
My wires were cut short too and as I was rewiring I came to the conclusion that the wires were strung tight across and a large bump moved that swing arm and sliced the wires.
So leave a loop somewhere.
__________________

__________________
pjanits is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 09:36 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Dave Mac's Avatar
 
Trailer: Burro 13 ft 1979
Posts: 186
Quote:
Some folks use fuse panels, as you can see in the pic I chose to put the different circuits on inline fuse holders and used wiring blocks to make sense out of the jungle.
Very nice looking. I would like to see mine looking this way also. I like the wiring blocks and fuse holder idea. Neat and efficient.

Dave
__________________
Dave Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 09:41 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Dave Mac's Avatar
 
Trailer: Burro 13 ft 1979
Posts: 186
Quote:
Here's what I saw when I removed the wheel hub of my '81 13ft Burro. I chose not to do anything about the brakes on mine because I thought they were a luxury,
i on the other hand fell I will want the brakes for sure. From here to camping is all up hill. And fairly steep incline at that. So coming back I want trailer brakes. My tow vehical for now is my 1993 Jeep Wrangler. I realy got to get these working soon or I'm gona miss using the Burro this year. Despite what it looks like I want to get it up in the woods and try it out.
Dave
__________________
Dave Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 09:45 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Dave Mac's Avatar
 
Trailer: Burro 13 ft 1979
Posts: 186
Ok question.... What's a new axle with brakes cost?
__________________
Dave Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 09:48 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Dave Mac's Avatar
 
Trailer: Burro 13 ft 1979
Posts: 186
Also.. How can I test my brakes as they are now. I have the 2 wires sticking out the back of the hub and I can get 12volt from battery to them. Is there a way to test them or is straight 12volts to much?
__________________
Dave Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 11:09 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Herb P's Avatar
 
Trailer: Boler 1700SGH (Stage II twoftitis)
Posts: 284
Quote:
Also.. How can I test my brakes as they are now. I have the 2 wires sticking out the back of the hub and I can get 12volt from battery to them. Is there a way to test them or is straight 12volts to much?
A new axle with brakes is going to cost a bunch of money that you may not need to spend... The brakes are really simple in theory... There's no magic there... If you can get power to the electromagnet, then the rest is all mechanical and can be worked from the comfort of a milk crate with the drum off...

The way I tested my brakes for basic operation was to jack up one wheel at a time, spin it like crazy, and then slide the manual lever of my brake controller... After a short scraping noise, the wheel stopped spinning. Since you don't have any of that hooked up, I would think 12V is not too much to apply to it for testing (I don't think I've seen my brake controller apply more than 8 or so volts)... It's an electromagnet so I don't believe polarity is important unless one side is grounded

Frankly, I would inspect the pads... If they have any meat on them whatsoever, they're probably fine (unless they've gotten greasy. Never handle brake pads with oily or greasy hands)... Check the drums, if they're not excessively scored, they're probably fine as well... The drums should (probably) have a number cast into them somewhere.. That number is the maximum diameter of the drum... If they're scored but still within tolerance, you can get the drums turned for about $10 at your local brake shop.. Or you can just take them to the brake shop and have them inspect the drums... Personally, I avoid having drums/discs turned because it just removes needless 'meat' which increases the likelihood of warping...

Once you confirm basic function, I would simply run new wire to the trailer connector... The higher the gauge, the better, in my opinion but I think 12ga is probably a reasonable thickness... There's not much current flowing through the brake wires so loss is not that much of an issue.

btw, my highly sarcastic post earlier in the thread was intended as levity towards Brian which apparently was taken correctly by Brian but others took offense for some reason... My point (and Brians probably) stands.. Any wiring outside the trailer needs to be secured, sheathed, and sealed. Those wires are dangling, that means they're rubbing (one of those wires goes through a hole on the axle hanger, that hole probably has sharp edges). If you look in the end of those blue splice connectors, you will see a metal blade that has pierced the insulation on the wire. If you can see it, moisture can get in there, and will corrode it. That it has been like that for 30 years and not caused a problem, doesn't mean it will continue to do so. It really costs very little (in terms of time or materials) to fix all that up, and could well save you an afternoon spent at the side of the road or a ticket from law enforcement... Others will disagree and that's fine. It's your wiring and your decision. I have no emotional investment in your wiring.
__________________
Herb P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 11:38 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Bigfoot Mike's Avatar
 
Name: Mike
Trailer: Bigfoot 25 ft
Posts: 7,317
Quote:
Ok question.... What's a new axle with brakes cost?
When I bought my high lift axle, it was $350.00 USD plus shipping. I was able to negotiate that to $250.00 USD plus shipping.

Shipping was $100.00

I traded the take off axle (it was new) for labor to install the high lift axle.

BTW: I complete set of new hubs, brake drums and brakes is $125.00 USD.
__________________
Bigfoot Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 12:25 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Dave Mac's Avatar
 
Trailer: Burro 13 ft 1979
Posts: 186
Quote:
A new axle with brakes is going to cost a bunch of money that you may not need to spend... The brakes are really simple in theory...
(Snip)
Once you confirm basic function, I would simply run new wire to the trailer connector... The higher the gauge, the better, in my opinion but I think 12ga is probably a reasonable thickness... There's not much current flowing through the brake wires so loss is not that much of an issue.
(snip)
btw, my highly sarcastic post earlier in the thread was intended as levity towards Brian which apparently was taken correctly by Brian but others took offense for some reason...
I'm with you on the simple brake thing. I have a feeling (if the weather would cool off) I will be pulling off the drums and seeing whats in there. New wiring seems pretty easy and from what I see and you see in my picutres new wire is necessity. I would like to find a nice wiring block as seen in Greg's post and start from there would seem to be the right direction. Get the block set and fuses setup and then bring new wire to it. Some nice sheathing for the wire and maybe zip ties? Zip ties may not last long enough though I'll give that some thought..

This morning the wife and I went in and stripped the old carpet off the ceiling and putty knifed off what glue or whatever was up there. What a mess. I need to find some wood for my new "Wood Group" or at least the hatch covers. The heat is preventing me from getting very far.
Dave
__________________
Dave Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 04:52 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
I'm with you on the simple brake thing. I have a feeling (if the weather would cool off) I will be pulling off the drums and seeing whats in there. New wiring seems pretty easy and from what I see and you see in my picutres new wire is necessity. I would like to find a nice wiring block as seen in Greg's post and start from there would seem to be the right direction. Get the block set and fuses setup and then bring new wire to it. Some nice sheathing for the wire and maybe zip ties? Zip ties may not last long enough though I'll give that some thought..

This morning the wife and I went in and stripped the old carpet off the ceiling and putty knifed off what glue or whatever was up there. What a mess. I need to find some wood for my new "Wood Group" or at least the hatch covers. The heat is preventing me from getting very far.
Dave

Dave... a couple of points. First, the wiring you see goes to the brake magnet. It won't have any splices between the connector you see and the electro magnets. If you feel you need to replace the wiring, I'd suggest you replace the magnets rather than trying to splice inside the drum. Splices inside the brake drum aren't a particularly good idea. Generally, the brake wires are sheathed with a pretty tough nylon mesh covering over the actual brake wires (which appears to be what yours are currently), and they generally exit the drum through a rubber grommet through the hole in the backing plate. New magnets may not have the nylon sheath over the wires, and aren't shipped that way.

Second, never leave power on to brake magnets for more than a couple of minutes. They will overheat and burn out very quickly, especially drawing a full amperage load directly from a battery.

Roger
__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 05:48 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Herb P's Avatar
 
Trailer: Boler 1700SGH (Stage II twoftitis)
Posts: 284
Quote:
I'm with you on the simple brake thing. I have a feeling (if the weather would cool off) I will be pulling off the drums and seeing whats in there. New wiring seems pretty easy and from what I see and you see in my picutres new wire is necessity. I would like to find a nice wiring block as seen in Greg's post and start from there would seem to be the right direction. Get the block set and fuses setup and then bring new wire to it. Some nice sheathing for the wire and maybe zip ties? Zip ties may not last long enough though I'll give that some thought..

This morning the wife and I went in and stripped the old carpet off the ceiling and putty knifed off what glue or whatever was up there. What a mess. I need to find some wood for my new "Wood Group" or at least the hatch covers. The heat is preventing me from getting very far.
Dave
A terminal block like that is one way to do it and it's a good plan... I use breaker panels myself but it's largely personal preference...

There are a few ways to deal with sheathing... The common approach is to get the black ribbed stuff and there's not much wrong with it other than it gets brittle over time... I have a spool of this stuff that is a braided nylon that expands when you push it (like a chinese finger puzzle)... I've had the spool for years and I use it for all the harnesses I build for various vehicle projects... It seems to hold up ok but is relatively expensive... There's also some translucent white spirally stuff that works fairly well to stave off abrasion but is really tedious to install for long runs and doesn't really seem to protect the wire from the elements... But again, I'm not a professional so I just use what I have... I really really despise electrical tape. After about 6 months, it goes all gooey so if you ever want to do a repair, you get sticky from head to toe... If you're at an electrical supply store, then ask for some self-fusing tape. It's not sticky and the way it's applied is you pull it off the roll, stretch it, and wrap it around whatever... It then fuses to itself and turns effectively solid rubber... The only thing it doesn't like is heat, solvents and engine oil so it doesn't work so well in the engine compartment of your car but is ideally suited to under or in your trailer. Heat shrink is also good if you are going to solder wires together. If you have the patience, I recommend connecting to your brake wires using solder and then heat shrink ( the kind with integral glue is awesome)... Failing that, butt splice connectors work; I have ones with built-in self-gluing heat-shrink so after I crimp the splice on, I wave a heat gun at it and it shrinks over the wire insulation and the glue seals it absolutely waterproof...

As far as zip ties, they're good to use for securing things, but for outside use, get some high quality black ones which don't turn brittle in the presence of UV... My pet peeve is when people cut zip ties with a knife or side cutters. There's always a small (1mm or 2mm) sticking out the end so when you reach down into your dash, or engine compartment or storage compartment, the ends of the zip ties gouge into the back of your hand or underarm. The right way to use them is to buy the little $10 stretcher gizmo that stretches the zip ties, cuts them and then releases them so they're flush.. The other way is to get some flush side cutters and give the zip tie a little tug at the same time as you snip the end off. Then the end sort of snaps back into place leaving a nice smooth surface; but it takes a bit of practice to get that right...

Once you've made a small investment in all this stuff, you'll be able to make long lasting high quality repairs and harnesses and will have trouble free camping for many years...
__________________
Herb P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 05:51 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Dave Mac's Avatar
 
Trailer: Burro 13 ft 1979
Posts: 186
Quote:
Dave... a couple of points. First, the wiring you see goes to the brake magnet. It won't have any splices between the connector you see and the electro magnets.
(Snip)
Roger
I was not looking to replace any wire already in the drum. I'm with ya though. I am looking to put new connectors on the existing wire coming out of the drum (no connectors there now) and going from there. I want to open the drum to see what it all looks loke and clean up or replace what is needed.
Thanks much Roger
__________________
Dave Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 06:06 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Dave Mac's Avatar
 
Trailer: Burro 13 ft 1979
Posts: 186
Quote:
A terminal block like that is one way to do it and it's a good plan... I use breaker panels myself but it's largely personal preference...

There are a few ways to deal with sheathing... (Snip)
Wow... Thanks for all the info. I get a great idea with each post here! I'm gona find me some of that sheathing you mentioned. And I have some of the black zip ties I got at work from the HVAC installers. They may be a bit large but because of them being thicker I guess they'll last that much longer. I assume zip tieing around the sheathed wire to the axle will be a must and someone gave the suggestion of leaving a nice loop for the axle to articulate with out pulling on my wires. Also I have a solder gun so I like this idea also rather than using a connector. And Getting this wiring together with zero connectors would be nice.
Question on the wiring from the individual wheels should I be bringing each wheels wires to the distribution block or bring the right wheel wires to the left wheel wires and connect the two then go to the distribution block? I don't have much to go on from what's left of the wiring thats there now.
Dave
__________________
Dave Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2007, 06:15 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Ok question.... What's a new axle with brakes cost?
Dave,

A good rubber torsion axle has a design life of about 20 years and some of them make it to 30. Your '79 should have lots of years left it in at this point unless it was underspec'd (as was my '87 Burro) to begin with and wore out prematurely. You can price them directly but when I put a new Dexter #10 3,500 lb axle with 10" electric brakes under my Burro 17' two (three now?) years ago, that axle was roughly (IIRC) $350 fob Cedar Rapids, IA. It cost me about $250 to have a welder cut the old axle off and install the new one.

A #9 axle rubbered at 2,200 lbs would be substantially less than the #10.

Hopefully that'll give you an idea of what you're looking at.

Roger
__________________

__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
brakes, burro


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electric Brakes Steve Smith Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 10 08-23-2008 06:36 PM
Electric brakes Greg Janke Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 11 04-01-2008 12:45 AM
electric brakes Hub Bru Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 1 01-30-2007 12:19 PM
Electric brakes Greg Janke Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.