2013 or 14 Subaru Outback 2.5L CVT - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-21-2013, 09:25 PM   #29
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I just changed one of the inner boots on my 08 Outback at 80,000 miles. Seems that's common now with the extra heat generated by the later models (true with most cars these days) whether towing or not towing. At least it's not too difficult or expensive to do and the Outback forum gives good guidance.
I have an ultra-gauge on mine that measures coolant temperature to the tenth of a degree, and the coolant temperature doesn't seem go up any more than on my Dodge Dakota in the same conditions, so I feel good about that. Just wish I had a transmission temperature gauge.
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Old 10-21-2013, 09:38 PM   #30
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I also on my previously owned Outbacks had no boot or belt issues- have 3 others as a bench mark - all had way more miles on them. None had the failures this one has had with only 65,000 miles on it - but it should be noted about half those miles have been towing. I am not just a week-end warrior. Did not tow with previous Outbacks. Also noted the only other person who I have meet with an Outback that has had to replace boots and we have a *Lot* of people in this area to ask as they are a very popular car (at least 6 on the street I live), is someone I mentioned previously who also tows with theirs a lot of miles a 16' trailer.

I appreciate your comments re heat not having much to do with boots but I have a couple of real good mechanics who would disagree with you on that point. Rubber products and excessive heat dont go well together

Boots and belts are not the only items that have worn out much sooner than I have experienced with previously owned Outbacks and a good argument that each of those items could well be related to towing a trailer close to the towing specs max weight (and over on the tongue) for many miles as well.

If I really wanted bury my head in the sand I could easily come with other reasons for each issue, but its my gut feeling they are all related. Thus the reason the Outback is being retired from towing regardless of what the cause of the latest/bigger issue is found to be caused by.
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Old 10-21-2013, 09:41 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radar1 View Post
I just changed one of the inner boots on my 08 Outback at 80,000 miles. Seems that's common now with the extra heat generated by the later models (true with most cars these days) whether towing or not towing. At least it's not too difficult or expensive to do and the Outback forum gives good guidance.
.
LOL ok John you now make three people who I know who have had to replaced a boot - if I am not mistaken you use to tow with that Outback didnt you? Although I do know that a boot can take a hit on the highway causing a small tear and early demise.... which may account for why you have only had to replace one.
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Old 10-21-2013, 10:12 PM   #32
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more trouble

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Blowing an oil line took out your turbo, not the camper. Pulling the camper doesn't raise your oil pressure. I always figure turbos have a 100k mile lifespan, that's why my subaru doesn't have one.

The other thing that could shorten the life is your egt while towing.
My OB Turbo had 124k on it when it failed. I also lost a front wheel bearing hub unit and an axle assembly on the same trip, while pulling the Scamp 16'. Another $1,100.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:26 PM   #33
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Boots and belts seem like a normal wear item to me. We replaced our front boots at 200,000 and our belt at about 180,000, just because it hadn't been changed since new though we always carry one with us.

We had never changed our manual transmission fluid so we had it done at 200,000 miles as well. All were relatively inexpensive.

I really don't understand increased vehicle temperatures. What's the source of increased temps?

As to gauges we use and Ultragauge to measure temperature. It seems accurate, or minimally is good at detecting change. Itlet us know our thermostat had failed as well as giving early indication of other potential failures, like our spark plugs needed to be changed when it detected a rare mis-fire at 150,000 miles.

As to more complicated elements like turbos and automatic transmisiions, I lean towards the simpler unit and would buy another CRV with a manual transmission the day one is available.
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Old 10-22-2013, 05:50 PM   #34
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Norm,
It seems the newer cars are designed to run hotter for more efficiency, plus more and more optional items are being added these days that consume energy and also contribute to heat buildup.
Dodge trucks even have shutters available in front of the radiator now to ensure the engine gets up to operating temperature quicker, and some auto transmissions operate at higher RPMs when first started to get them up to higher temps quicker.
I remember the good old days when my 56 Chevy had no A/C, no electric wipers, no electric windows, no power steering or brakes, no emissions equipment, no alternator, and "three on the tree" shifter (which I replaced with a Hurst floor shifter).
(Did I say good old days?)

I also like to keep things simple, and turbos seem like they could be more trouble than they're worth, although I still like the idea of a small turbo-diesel.
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Old 10-22-2013, 06:57 PM   #35
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John,

I received this same point in a private email, today's cars run hotter. My counter is that our 2004 Honda CRV is not very different from a 2014 CRV...same engine, same engine volume, same options. I suspect a 2014 Outback is not much different from a 2006 Outback.

I admit that decades older cars carried fewer options and had bigger engine compartments and ran cooler, but it's hard to attribute the new Outbacks small failures to higher temperatures. At least in my case today's Honda, outside of shape, is not much different from 10 years ago.

Maybe I should get a new clutch for our 2004 Honda CRV and not buy a 2014.

We're in GA tonight at St. Marys, one of our favorite little towns. It's pouring sitting here in our water tight haven. Loving Georgia SHRIMP.

I'd buy a Honda diesel but not to sure about a VW.
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Old 10-22-2013, 08:40 PM   #36
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I really don't understand increased vehicle temperatures. What's the source of increased temps?
Back in the 60's my dad was towing 13 to 17' trailers with his V8 Ford. Pulled off at a rest area and always popped the hood to let it cool down. I recall the blast of hot air when the hood went up.

We did the same thing last year with the V6 G35 after towing the 23' on a rolling hill highway for a couple hours. Luke warm air, nothing more. The aluminum seems dissipate the heat better plus the fact we are burning less fuel these days which produces less heat.
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:12 PM   #37
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Towing Up Hills With 2.5L CVT Outback?

Has anyone had significant experience going through mountains or steeper grades?
Does it hold speed reasonably well?
I have a 13' Scamp with a front bathroom.
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Old 11-09-2013, 03:37 AM   #38
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If it's the same as a 2011, I thought it was god awful without a trailer. I wasn't completely sure I was going to make it up an onramp, and didn't appreciate merging at 55 mph. The 6 speed manual drives like you have another 50hp behind it.

Holding speed in mountains? Good luck. I would bet 30-40 mph. Mine doesn't keep speed on moderate hills with the manual with a 4-500 pound trailer behind it, unless it's shifted down to fourth or fifth.
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:27 AM   #39
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Shifting or gearing down is a good thing. Brings the engine into a zone where it feels comfortable. The 18 wheelers do it all the time when climbing.

I have many bikes (pedal bikes). One has 30 speeds. At one time or another I have used all those gears. It works.
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:42 AM   #40
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It's not a good thing when you're doing it in moderate hills and want to do it in mountains with 1,000 more lbs behind you. It's turning some pretty high rpms in fourth.

Edit: mine is a legacy, so you have even more weight already.
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:54 AM   #41
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Jared, how high would 4th be with the Outback?

With our 5 speed car we tow in 4th. At 100KPH we are at 2,700 RPM.
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Old 11-09-2013, 07:17 AM   #42
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IIRC, around 4500 rpms. If I remember tomorrow, I'll check.
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