2014 Subaru Forester- 1500 lb towing - Page 8 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-24-2013, 04:59 PM   #99
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Originally Posted by dbailey View Post
They're playing games with prices and options...


What is the world coming to? I'm truly shocked to hear that vehicle manufacturers would indulge in marketing tricks!

Next thing you know, car/RV salesmen will start gilding the lily, truth-wise...


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Old 02-24-2013, 07:37 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by Bobbie Mayer View Post
Funny how any discussion of tow vehicles goes on and on and on.

I agree on the seven passenger- why not offer that as an option? I suspect the whole passenger/cargo compartment is pretty safe in a Subaru.

Personally I'd like the opposite- a two-passenger with extended cargo area. Or at least a back seat that folds complete filling the open space. I rarely carry two passengers and almost always carry crates.
"Subaru" is the Japanese name for the constellation of "Pleiades" which represents the seven daughters of Atlas. Thus the seven stars in the corporate emblem.
No wonder he felt the weight of the world on his shoulders!
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:34 PM   #101
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"Subaru" is the Japanese name for the constellation of "Pleiades" which represents the seven daughters of Atlas. Thus the seven stars in the corporate emblem.
No wonder he felt the weight of the world on his shoulders!
Except- and I know this will be hard for us westerners to believe- when they named that constellation "Sumaru", which in their culture means "'to get together' or 'to tie together', the Japanese had no notion of the Greeks' superstitions .

Dunno why Subaru took the "m" out and put the "b" in there, but one can see the appeal of the original meaning for a Japanese car company....

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Old 02-24-2013, 09:06 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post


What is the world coming to? I'm truly shocked to hear that vehicle manufacturers would indulge in marketing tricks!

Next thing you know, car/RV salesmen will start gilding the lily, truth-wise...


Francesca
I said I was annoyed... I didn't say I was surprised.

It probably wouldn't annoy me as much as it does if I hadn't already been thoroughly frustrated by the whole process.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:28 AM   #103
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<snip>
If you can't go up a grade with it and stay above 40 mph, or accelerate from 0-60 in 30 seconds, you're a danger to others, IMHO. In some areas around here, you have to pull onto interstate from damn near a dead stop, with not that long of an on ramp. You better be able to get on it. If it's a two lane that has one safe passing spot every 50 miles, it's even worse. I had that when I brought my camper back. <Snip> The only leeway I would give somebody is if they only haul it in an area that doesn't have hills, etc.

When you're driving along in the right lane with traffic ahead of you, traffic to the left of you, and the car in front of you suddenly darts hard left because they were 6" from going in the trunk of a vehicle (or back of a trailer) doing 45 on interstate, it's a problem and they shouldn't be on the road. You can only give yourself so much distance on the road before somebody else pulls in and cuts it in half. I've been there, and don't appreciate it.
<snip>

The way back had surprise 40 mph winds gusting to 60, and driving rain. It wasn't unsafe, but I could definitely feel that flatbed with two kayaks and a bicycle on it getting pushed sideways more than I liked. With luck, it would have been a white knuckle ride with a camper, or easily much worse.

I was shocked when I came on here, and saw what people were pulling campers with (and still am). I've been in enough hairy situations with more than adequate tow vehicles, if it had been with my Subaru, I would have been S.O.L. I don't doubt they can tow ok under normal conditions, but I highly doubt it will turn out well in one of those bad situations where you pucker so hard, you suck up the seat cushion.
<snip>
.
There is another option. If conditions are bad--pull over and wait. Even with a beefy tow rig pulling a moderate sized tow there will be conditions where it is not safe to drive. That happened to me once driving from New Mexico to Texas. I had a K5 Blazer 4x4 diesel pulling a car hauler trailer with a Corvette on the back. The driving rain was manageable...I just slowed down. It was the wind that made be decide to pull over. I found an abandoned service station and tucked into the lee side of it as lose as I could. Even while parked in the lee of the building my TV was being pushed around in an alarming manner. I was scared a tornado would carry me away. I estimated the wind speeds to be 70 mph. There was nothing more I could do so I tried to sleep and after a few hours I did and rested there the rest of the night.

Anyone with a camper can easily stop and wait out traffic, a storm, or if it is hilly, drive that section late at night when speed is less important. This is what sailors do--wait out weather and tidal currents. It is a huge advantage having a comfortable place to sleep, rest, or cook.

If people are cutting in front of you, let them and maintain a safe distance to matter what. One thing I like about my Silverado is I can see over other cars. Twice in the last few years I saw a car 2-3 ahead of me smoke tires braking. I was able to brake fast enough to stop and also watch behind so that the guy behind me did not rear end me, while the people in front were all over them place trying to avoid a collision--some didn't. While it is frustrating watching one car after another pass on the right and cut in front, you just have to let them or pull over to the right and lower your speed, or get off the freeway.

Many people think I'm crazy for driving at night. I like it because there is less traffic, the cars are more visible, brake lights are very obvious, and people tend to drive slower. It is also easy to tell when someone is driving drunk and impaired. I've reported many of these to the police and watched them get busted. Better a ticket than a fatality.

One thing I've always chosen in a TV is something big enough to sleep in.

My old M5 diesel Blazer had the rear seat removed and a futon substituted for most of the 1/4 million mikes I put on it in 15 years. I would drive to San Francisco many nights and sleep in the yacht club parking lot and be the first one there for a regatta. It was handy for driving at night because I could pull over whenever I was tired, which allowed me to drive farther, and cover more ground. If at night I found myself in a construction zone, I could press on and avoid it during daylight hours and sleep on the far side when it was clear.

My Volvo 240 wagon has 77" of space in the back if I remove the rear seat bottom and fold the seat back down. None of the newer wagons have this much space. As a five speed it works well towing using only the first four gears. It could tow a 1300 lb camper but I don't think I will. I will likely just pull a small 500 lb boat trailer with it.

My K3500 Silverado is a diesel dually and an tow anything up to 12,000 lbs tag and 15000 lbs gooseneck or fifth wheel. I have a cap on the back and a two level storage system so I can carry 1000 lbs and still have room for a big mattress and DC chiller. I've gone cross country many times in 72 hours both by myself (a bit harder) and with a relief driver. It is an extended cab and the rear seat while narrow makes a good bed for the relief driver.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:35 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by Bobbie Mayer
<snip>

Personally I'd like the opposite- a two-passenger with extended cargo area. Or at least a back seat that folds complete filling the open space. I rarely carry two passengers and almost always carry crates.
I agree. I am either by myself or with one person. Rarely do I have three people in the car--once a year.. Few enough times that I would prefer a two door station wagon with no rear seat, for example. Lots of cars do not have flush folding rear seats.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:54 AM   #105
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One of the things that discussions like these brings to mind is the attitude of people towards slow vehicles.

Yeah, if a third party is driving slowly for some reason (e.g. large trailer/small tv combo) they can be dangerous to be around. Other people tend to do stupid things in such a circumstance (passing when it's not safe, following too close, etc.). Do you put the blame and the hate on the person driving the slow vehicle, or on the people doing the stupid things? Seems to me that the driver of the slow vehicle gets the lion's share of the criticism, when it's the people doing the stupid things that deserve to be castigated.

I guess we all understand the frustration of being stuck behind a slow vehicle when we're in a hurry, so we cut the stupid drivers some slack. But the point remains that until they chose to do their stupid thing, there was nothing really dangerous about this situation.

Sure, there are situations where the slow vehicle is actually dangerous (e.g. pulling onto a crowded interstate in a vehicle that's can't accelerate quickly enough). But more often than not, the driver of the slow vehicle is being, at worst, impolite by not allowing others to pass from time to time. I try to save my frustration for the people who do stupid and dangerous things.
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Old 02-28-2013, 11:04 AM   #106
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Dbailey,
I agree. If you're the slow driver holding others up, pull over and let them pass.

It is part of being a safe driver.
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Old 02-28-2013, 11:16 AM   #107
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The presumption that those of us without "pickups" are all poking along at 40 is just is a fallacy.

My 4-cyl car/trailer combo is perfectly capable of highway speeds in most situations other than steeper grades. And on that subject: if every vehicle had to go over a mountain pass at 65mph, there would be no loaded semis on the road.

As for those who purport to drive at average speeds over 70 while towing, I say: time and experience will teach otherwise!

Most who've towed for any length of time/distance generally do so at or near 60 mph. And I'm talking about the biggest combinations. sample discussion

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Old 02-28-2013, 11:21 AM   #108
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The problem with steep grades is that the semis are going slower than we are with our small trailers and the passenger vehicles are going faster. Two lanes, three speeds. Sometimes the semis can use the shoulder which helps but other times the car/trailer combo has to pull into the passing lane to pass a slower (often much slower) truck.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:34 PM   #109
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There is another option. If conditions are bad--pull over and wait. Even with a beefy tow rig pulling a moderate sized tow there will be conditions where it is not safe to drive.
So true and it can be unsafe for many reasons. The thing is that there seems to be an assumption by some that because someone is pulling with a smaller tow vehicle and going slow it is due to their lack of power to keep up or they have an unsafe tow. Its a good bet that may not be the case at all.

A lot of people choose to drive slower when towing regardless of what size of tug they have or the trailer they are towing as they believe it to be the safer thing to do for everyone they share the road with. I actually pass a lot of folks towing with much bigger tugs than myself but I also consider myself conservative when it comes to towing speeds. I personally would not tow at 75 mph regardless of what vehicle or trailer I was pulling or what state I was in. I am also aware having talked with the state patrol in two states where a posted speed of 75 mph is common that its not against the law to slow it down when towing as in their opinions a very good case can be made as to why it is unsafe to tow at 75 mph and you would be hard pressed to find a judge that would disagree with that. In their words the speed limit of 75 mph is the max one can travel not the minimum.
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Old 02-28-2013, 02:22 PM   #110
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The presumption that those of us without "pickups" are all poking along at 40 is just is a fallacy. My 4-cyl car/trailer combo is perfectly capable of highway speeds in most situations other than steeper grades. And on that subject: if every vehicle had to go over a mountain pass at 65mph, there would be no loaded semis on the road. As for those who purport to drive at average speeds over 70 while towing, I say: time and experience will teach otherwise! Most who've towed for any length of time/distance generally do so at or near 60 mph. And I'm talking about the biggest combinations. sample discussion Francesca
I never said people were poking around at 40. The test that you thought ridiculous had that as a standard, which is why I used it. Nobody has mentioned that a rig should be doing 65 over a mountain pass, I'm not sure where you got that from. I have had plenty of time and experience towing, I'll continue to do it my way.

I see a lot of people on that forum doing 65, some doing well over, and most of the ones going under that are in ca and have a 55mph limit, not sure what that proves.
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Old 02-28-2013, 07:45 PM   #111
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The company I'm currently most annoyed with is Nissan. They've introduced what looks to be a great new vehicle in the Pathfinder (though larger than we need, not too large). But they've taken something basic (roof rails) and put it in a higher option package. So if I want roof racks, I have to spend money on crap I don't like. ...
Yakima and Thule have some pretty good options for adding your own racks these days. I prefer their crossbars to the smaller, less wide factory ones. Here's an image of the crossbar holders I put on my truck. They use blind bolts so you don't need to remove the headliner, and you can easily remove the crossbars or add them on.
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DSCF2526 (1000 x 750).jpg   DSCF2531 (600 x 450).jpg  

DSCF2535 (600 x 450).jpg  
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:06 PM   #112
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My Volvo 240 wagon has 77" of space in the back if I remove the rear seat bottom and fold the seat back down. None of the newer wagons have this much space. As a five speed it works well towing using only the first four gears. It could tow a 1300 lb camper but I don't think I will. I will likely just pull a small 500 lb boat trailer with it.
Huh. That's funny because per the manual 240's have a 2000 lb tow rating without trailer brakes and 3200 lbs with.

This is what I tow my Boler with.

That's one of the reasons I love all mine. (I just picked up another wagon to restore).

That back seat option is another reason. I have hauled an incredible amount of things in the back. A six foot armoire. A full size stove. Filing cabinets; etc. Never had to sleep in it but like the fact I could if needed.
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