4 cylinder Tacoma - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 05-23-2016, 03:00 PM   #15
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Name: Steven
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When we retired , we bought a 1999 Scamp 16 ft which we towed with an anemic 1999 6 cylinder truck . We stayed off the 65/70 MPH freeways and if you plan a little you can avoid driving when traffic is heavy and your slower speeds cause issues. Driving 55 MPH on state /County roads will make getting there take a little longer but it is far less hectic and you don't get as many one finger salutes.. I for one worry more about getting there safely and a lot less about gas mileage but to each their own.
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Old 09-13-2016, 12:43 AM   #16
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Also own a 4 cyl. Tacoma, 5 spd. manual. 2.7L

Last year I spent 3 months and 8,000 miles towing my 13 ft. Trillium with no issues all the way to the end of the road - North to the Arctic Circle and beyond.

No dog, but two of us on the trip. Yes, it's slow going up hills in 3rd gear and if there are any vehicles behind I would find a safe place to pull over and let them pass.

My truck is a 2006 and has 100,000 miles on it so far. Next big trip will be across Canada and back with the trailer in 2018.

This is my 3rd 4 cyl Toyota pickup. Properly maintained they go forever. My gas mileage towing was around 19 mpg. Usually, 26 combined without the tow. The newer Tacoma's, even the 6 cylinders get better mileage than that, though!

Try out your present 4 cyl. with a 13 ft. FG and see how you like it. Remember, the truck is already paid for now! (I'm assuming.)
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Old 09-13-2016, 12:29 PM   #17
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Being able to pull a load is only half the equation. More importantly, you have to be able to safely STOP that load, too, especially in an emergency situation.
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Old 09-13-2016, 12:54 PM   #18
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Being able to pull a load is only half the equation. More importantly, you have to be able to safely STOP that load, too, especially in an emergency situation.
That's why trailer brakes are important, especially with a smaller tug. Appropriately sized and properly adjusted trailer brakes will stop the trailer with minimal additional burden on the vehicle's brakes.
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Old 09-13-2016, 03:20 PM   #19
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Braking with Tacoma

Prior to the Trillium I had a tent trailer that weighed more and had electric brakes which worked well with the Tacoma. Since getting the Trillium I've haven't felt the need, yet. Having a standard transmission and using the engine braking really helps, but of course not in an emergency.

Have only had to stomp on the binders once with the trailer attached and it felt comfortable, although that was on a gravel road.

I believe how you drive has a lot to do with it too!

When/if I change to a larger tire size and raise the trailer I will probably have brakes installed just for that extra insurance.
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Old 09-15-2016, 10:13 PM   #20
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Have only had to stomp on the binders once with the trailer attached and it felt comfortable, although that was on a gravel road.
Wait till you have to stop fast on a corner, or when the road is wet. Then you might see just how important trailer brakes really are as the trailer spins your truck around. It's bad advice to imply they're not needed if you just drive correctly. Trailer brakes are very important.
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Old 09-16-2016, 01:30 AM   #21
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Have only had to stomp on the binders once with the trailer attached and it felt comfortable, although that was on a gravel road.

I believe how you drive has a lot to do with it too!
Based on personal experience the time when you will really wish you had trailer brakes will have nothing to do with "how you drive" but how the people you share the road with drive.

The reality is you have ZERO control over what happens right in front of you when traveling at highway speeds!

The law in BC and many other provinces is that the trailer is required to have brakes if its weight is half of or more of the weight of what ever is pulling it.

The Tacoma is a VERY light truck with a curb weight of only about 3700lbs - depending on which year or model it may weigh less or a bit more. A loaded up for camping Trillium 13' is going to weigh in anywhere from 1800lbs to 2200lbs. Making it a good bet its at least half the weight or more of the trucks weight.
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Old 09-16-2016, 07:24 AM   #22
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I too did not want to sell a perfectly-running '99 Nissan Frontier 4-cyl 5-spd manual when we got interested in camping. We bought the 13' Scamp Standard but loaded. It always weighs apx 1800 lbs on trips.

If I was pulling in flat land, I wouldnt hesitate to pull a 16' Scamp. But, I live in the "Hills of Tennessee" and I wouldnt even THINK of pulling anything larger/heavier with my Scamp. Yes, my truck is rated at 3500lbs also and my trailer weighs HALF of that nearly but I STILL would not pull a larger trailer with it. Believe me, on some of the hills I hit here, you WILL rev that little motor. That doesnt bother me until I hit some of the larger hills as well where they can be 2-3 miles worth of long climbing.

As far as automatic vs manual, I wouldnt pull with the combination I have with an automatic transmission. Someone mentioned you wont be "burning clutches"? I'd MUCH rather burn out a clutch than to strip/burn out an "automatic" and have it repaired! I also did not have to add a "cooler" with my manual shift- that tells you something there.

But, as always, this is my "experienced" take/opinion on pulling with a 4-cyl.

One final word of advice, what EVER you do, do **NOT** "lug" that 4 cyl motor!!! Keep the RPM's up and you will be fine.
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Old 09-16-2016, 07:27 AM   #23
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Based on personal experience the time when you will really wish you had trailer brakes will have nothing to do with "how you drive" but how the people you share the road with drive.

The reality is you have ZERO control over what happens right in front of you when traveling at highway speeds!
That gets my vote for best post of the year!
I'd like to suggest, more appropriately, what happens all around you.

I once needed trailer brakes when another vehicle and I were pulling into the same lane while passing a truck on opposite sides. Me on the left, them on the right. I caught a glimpse of them almost hitting the trailer in the side mirror. My guess is that they were still looking in their side mirror to make sure they had cleared the truck. A minor corrective movement on my part started the tail wagging the dog.
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Old 09-16-2016, 09:01 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Carol H View Post
Based on personal experience the time when you will really wish you had trailer brakes will have nothing to do with "how you drive" but how the people you share the road with drive.

The reality is you have ZERO control over what happens right in front of you when traveling at highway speeds!

The law in BC and many other provinces is that the trailer is required to have brakes if its weight is half of or more of the weight of what ever is pulling it.

The Tacoma is a VERY light truck with a curb weight of only about 3700lbs - depending on which year or model it may weigh less or a bit more. A loaded up for camping Trillium 13' is going to weigh in anywhere from 1800lbs to 2200lbs. Making it a good bet its at least half the weight or more of the trucks weight.
LOL, back when I was in college I never would have dreamed of the day when a 3700 lb vehicle would be deemed "VERY light"... I think my Mazda GLC only weighed about 2000 lbs. It got 32 mpg, way back in the '70s! My '84 Dodge Omni probably wasn't much heavier and I towed a 13' UHaul egg about 2000 miles with it!
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Old 09-16-2016, 11:09 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Mike Magee View Post
LOL, back when I was in college I never would have dreamed of the day when a 3700 lb vehicle would be deemed "VERY light"... I think my Mazda GLC only weighed about 2000 lbs. It got 32 mpg, way back in the '70s! My '84 Dodge Omni probably wasn't much heavier and I towed a 13' UHaul egg about 2000 miles with it!
:lout:lout Yup looking back on the good old days is alway good for a laugh or two. I loved the Ford Pinto I learned to drive with, until one day it blowup We did not wear seat belts, babies coming home from the hospital sitting on mom's lap and dad smoked a big old cigar while driving them home. No doubt after having a few drinks with the boys to welcome the new baby. No one ever considered wearing a helmet when playing hockey or riding a bike. We always drank water from the garden hose. Mom and Dad did not have a clue as to who we were really with or where. Could not call over to the neighbours to see if the kids where there as the party line was busy! Going to a Led Zeplin or Stone's concert was always guaranteed to end up in a riot with cops on horse back and sticks and someone getting hurt. Yup those where indeed the good old days!
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