Anti-Sway Bar - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-12-2012, 05:37 PM   #29
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Name: george
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Well Norm, regarding whether the WD is designed for the Honda, I'm not sure that is necessarily the correct way to view the subject. A guess would be that Honda does not mention WD because they most likely would prefer that the end user not really tow anything very heavy with that car.

But if we look beyond that, to be honest, a WD hitch I suppose in theory "could" be used on just about any tow vehicle. For instance, if a person looks at some of the videos of Hensley or Propride hitches, we see these set up up on some rather extreme examples. Such as the vid of the old Dodge Intrepid ( a unibody car ) with a triple axle Airstream hitched to it, and doing some very wild maneuvers.
And certainly I'm not trying to tell you how to hitch your rig.....hey, you're the one that has pulled it all over the country this way, and you seem to be happy. But I'm just looking at it from a standpoint of trailer weight, TV weight, tongue weight ( actual and/or preferred ) and how it can all be distributed either with or without a WD hitch.

All I am trying to say is if they day ever comes that you think that a WD hitch might improve the towing, I would not automatically "rule it out" of the Honda/Scamp equation. If you have never towed with WD, it really is a very nice system that adds to safety and driving ease. If you ever do consider it, the first place I would start would be a email or call to some of the companies that make the WD hitch. For what it's worth, I use a BlueOx. But I am also towing a bigger TT with a larger TV, so my situation is different than yours.

Best to you, and again, I'm delighted to hear that your "event" ended up all well.

george
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Old 02-12-2012, 06:35 PM   #30
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Honda CRV/Scamp

The combination of our 2004 Honda CRV and 1991 Scamp 16 tow beautifully. We're totally happy with the combination.

Our Scamps 192 pound tongue weight, measured last week, is handled easily by the Honda. The steering never feels light and the Honda sits flat, only down a 1/2 inch at the rear wheel wells.

One thing the Honda has is a relatively short rear overhang and when I have time I could shorten it by 3 more inches.

We get great mileage and the Honda's been totally reliable. The Scamp tracks like a dream, passing big trucks never effect the Scamp or Honda.

We can drive as fast as we want, usually 60 mph and get our 22+ mpg.

As well we have pressure sensors on the Scamp's tires.

I can't imagine needing more than we have.

We're at 160,000 miles and countng and by the time we return home in November we'll be at 180,000 miles.

Believe me if I thought we needed a weight distribution hitch I'd have one, particularly if I owned a nose heavy or nose loaded trailer.
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Old 02-12-2012, 06:55 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by gmw photos View Post

All I am trying to say is if they day ever comes that you think that a WD hitch might improve the towing, I would not automatically "rule it out" of the Honda/Scamp equation.

george
George you should be aware that although Honda's manual may not address the use of a WD a number of other auto manufactures do and there are some that come right out and state that a WD is not to be used...... so its not a matter or the WD being a good thing for all autos big or small as all are not designed the same and the use of WD can have not so good impact on the handling of some autos.
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Old 02-12-2012, 07:22 PM   #32
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We stopped at a truck stop in Mississippi a few years ago and discovered the tongue of the Aliner sitting on top of the ball instead of being locked down on it. Only the heavy tongue weight and smooth roads had kept it from coming apart.

The tip about raising the jack and seeing if it starts to lift the truck is one I will use every time from now on!

Thanks!
When I worked in trailer rental I saw this a number of times.
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Old 02-12-2012, 08:04 PM   #33
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George you should be aware that although Honda's manual may not address the use of a WD...
It all depends on the model and tow rating. I believe the CRV is rated for a Class II receiver with the small draw bar.
Nobody makes a WDH for that receiver.

My Honda Odyssey's manual specifically requires the use of a WDH above 2000 pounds due to front wheel drive issues. The factory receiver is a "Class III" with the 2" receiver that they label as 350 pounds maximum (instead of 500 pounds) just because of the WDH requirement.
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Old 02-12-2012, 08:07 PM   #34
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George you should be aware that although Honda's manual may not address the use of a WD a number of other auto manufactures do and there are some that come right out and state that a WD is not to be used...... so its not a matter or the WD being a good thing for all autos big or small as all are not designed the same and the use of WD can have not so good impact on the handling of some autos.
That's interesting. I would like to know what their logic is. Would love to speak with one of their engineers about it.
I know that there is some differences in how some of the different auto manufacturers spec how much weight is to be transferred to the steer axle. I've seen specs from "level" to "squat it", to "it's okay for it to be a little high". I suspect it has more to do with alignment issues than anything else.

If the rear suspension of Norm's Honda is only squatting 3/4" or so, that's pretty impressive. I would have guessed that you'd get more squat than that with the tongue weight, and whatever is in the back of the car. That's certainly a good sign. It must have fairly stiff springs, so again, that's a good sign. As many miles as he has pulled I'm sure he's way beyond the point of knowing too if it was hurting in the alignment department, as that would have long ago shown in odd or accelerated tire wear.

I'm just glad to see that there is a "fuel conscious alternative" to this whole idea of hardsided camping. It seems that most of the industry is geared towards the idea of TT's that weight 7K pounds or more, meaning the user has to buy an expensive TV that uses lots of fuel.

Happy camping everyone !

george
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Old 02-12-2012, 08:56 PM   #35
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That's interesting. I would like to know what their logic is. Would love to speak with one of their engineers about it.
Don't know why - I know the Outback has a tow cap of 2800 or 3000 depending on model and they have a class III hitch but the use of WD is not allowed. Some have suggested it has something to do with the unique all wheel drive type they have.
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:43 PM   #36
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Don't know why - I know the Outback has a tow cap of 2800 or 3000 depending on model and they have a class III hitch but the use of WD is not allowed. Some have suggested it has something to do with the unique all wheel drive type they have.
Is it Subaru that is saying no to weight distribution, or is it the manufacturer of the hitch that is saying no ? Looking on the etrailer website they say:
"There is not a hitch manufactured for the 2011 Subaru Outback that is compatible with weight distribution systems."

To me, that is not the auto manufacturer saying no, it sounds more like the hitch companies are not making a hitch that is heavy enough to take the strain of WD. Possibly they ( the hitch company ) are trying to limit their liability. If they make a stout hitch, and then someone hitches a trailer that is heavier than the auto mfr limits, then the hitch company may have some liability. Obviously, this is all just just speculation on my part....either way, it's all gone rather off topic, so I'll drop it.

george
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:57 PM   #37
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Is it Subaru that is saying no to weight distribution, or is it the manufacturer of the hitch that is saying no ? Looking on the etrailer website they say:
"There is not a hitch manufactured for the 2011 Subaru Outback that is compatible with weight distribution systems."

To me, that is not the auto manufacturer saying no, it sounds more like the hitch companies are not making a hitch that is heavy enough to take the strain of WD. Possibly they ( the hitch company ) are trying to limit their liability. If they make a stout hitch, and then someone hitches a trailer that is heavier than the auto mfr limits, then the hitch company may have some liability. Obviously, this is all just just speculation on my part....either way, it's all gone rather off topic, so I'll drop it.

george
It is the automakers that say no wdh, the cars that don't allow them are unibodies which have no frames, I towed with a Odyssey and they as well didn't recommend it as they are unibody, the unibody is not structually as strong as a body that sits on a frame, i towed with a single bar wdh which was limited to a 400 lb tongue weight, I still have the Ody but I bought a used 2001 F-150 as a second vehicle and is now my tv. I still use the wdh even though I have the truck as it takes all the porpoising out of the ride. As for a anti sway, I have it on there just to satisfy the folks who think I'm crazy for not using it, but I don't tell them I leave it loose shhh, I have seen no difference with or without them
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Old 02-12-2012, 11:39 PM   #38
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It is the automakers that say no wdh, the cars that don't allow them are unibodies which have no frames,..................................
Precisely, weight distribution hitch places huge torque on the towing vehicle pushing its front wheels down. Vehicles with frames (trucks and some SUVs) should be able to take this torque. I believe that Honda CRV is unibody construction. If Norm's Honda is squatting 1/2" in the rear I am not sure what value would WDH add. Personally, I would never mount WDH on any unibody vehicle.
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Old 02-13-2012, 09:41 AM   #39
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Is it Subaru that is saying no to weight distribution,
Yes Subaru in their manual states no WD so that is most likely why you cant find anyone who makes a wd specifically for it. The Outback is also a unibody as well as an All Wheel Drive so changing up how weight is distributed across the vehicle is probable not a great idea for handling either.
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Old 02-13-2012, 09:45 AM   #40
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I was under the impression that weight distributing hitches were sold/made according to amount of weight, not vehicle. In other words there are 600 lb bars, 1000 lbs bars and so on depending on the tongue weight of the trailer. The vehicle brand is not part of the equation, the hitch receiver is because it has limits.
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Old 02-13-2012, 09:54 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by gmw photos View Post
Looking on the etrailer website they say:
"There is not a hitch manufactured for the 2011 Subaru Outback that is compatible with weight distribution systems."

george

That's interesting. Subaru did change the body style up in 2011 for the Outback so perhaps the 2011 is allowed to have a weight distribution hitch but I know it is still a unibody....... Will have to ask about that on my next trip to the dealer.
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Old 02-13-2012, 10:11 AM   #42
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Nope. The new body style still has a "no WD" rule. It is in the manual for my 2011 Outback.

Also, someone mentioned that body on frame has a stronger body than unibody. This is incorrect. Body on frame has a stronger frame, but generally a weaker body. This is why full size pickups and large SUVs often have poor or marginal safety ratings.

In a unibody, the strength is in the entire chassis, not just a frame that sits below the body.

Having said that, it is probably the lack of a full ladder frame that prohibits many unibody cars from using WD. WD puts a lot of torque on the frame, as already mentioned in this thread.

To illustrate this, get a bathroom scale and an 8 foot 2x4. Lay the 2x4 down with one end on the scale. Now put 200 pounds of weight on the end that sits on the scale. That's like a 200 pound tongue weight without WD. Now, go to the end that is not on the scale and try to lever it (without lifting it from horizontal) so that it registers 100 pounds on the scale. In this second scenario, the scale represents the front wheels. You have to put a LOT of force through the 2x4 to put just half of the weight up front.
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