Anyone tow w/Honda pilot & 17FT. Casita - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-25-2018, 10:16 AM   #29
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The Honda Ridgeline is not a truck in the purest since of “Truck” as it does not have a frame....it is a unibody type vehicle....real trucks are built on frames and therefore are stronger with higher load ratings and can tow more weight safely.

Following that logic, "real" cars are built on a frame, because that's how they were once built.
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:52 AM   #30
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This is a great site for information on Honda Pilots:

https://www.piloteers.org
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Old 11-25-2018, 12:17 PM   #31
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John,
I purchased the ex model with 6 speed transmission.As far as I know the manual mode is only on the 9 speed.I suggest you test drive a new Highlander.Its free and the sharks at the dealership will love to see you!!
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Old 11-25-2018, 09:49 PM   #32
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I have put more than 16,000 towing miles on my 2017 Pilot/Casita SD17 this year. The Pilot is a very capable TV for the Casita. It has plenty of power, great mileage (18.9 average according to my scan gauge) and is quite comfortable on long hauls. There is plenty of cargo space with both back seats folded. Our former TV was a 2015 Tacoma 4x4, and there is no comparison in comfort and convenience.
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Old 11-25-2018, 09:58 PM   #33
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How slowly do you tow to get 18.9 MPG towing? Since I get about 11 MPG towing my 17 FD with my 2008 Ridgeline, I find that amazing. Another Ridgeline agreed that she got only about 11 MPG towing a 17 SD. Or maybe the 18.9 MPG is what you get when not towing. Or maybe you are one of those who tow at 55 MPH and never over 60? I do think that mileage for the Honda V-6 engine goes down drastically with speed above 55/60 MPH, so please clarify. Otherwise, you have a very special engine.
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Old 11-25-2018, 10:15 PM   #34
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My sweet spot is 62 mph. The 18+ towing mileage was over an 8,000 mile five week trip and verified by both my on board computer and scan gauge. I was pleasantly surprised.
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Old 11-25-2018, 10:51 PM   #35
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One thing I notice is the difference in age of the vehicles.Maybe the newer ones get better gas mileage?
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:57 PM   #36
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The Honda Ridgeline is not a truck in the purest since of “Truck” as it does not have a frame....it is a unibody type vehicle....real trucks are built on frames and therefore are stronger with higher load ratings and can tow more weight safely.
Actually Honda agrees. I was a Honda dealership mechanic when the Ridgeline was being designed. I was sent to training in Portland, Or. While I was there they talked about the rumored Honda Pickup. The instructor, who claimed to know what he was talking about, said that the main holdup at the time was that Honda figured a real truck had to have a frame and Honda only built unibody vehicles. To build a frame vehicle would take a whole new assembly plant which would be a billion dollar investment in the plant alone. That did not count the cost of developing the vehicle that was to be built there.

At the same time as the Ridgeline was being designed, Mercedes had a lot of extra money on hand and wanted to buy somebody. The called Honda to inquire and Honda told them not to waste their money on a plane ticket because they weren't interested. So Mercedes bought Chrysler instead. There wasn't anything they could do to force Honda to sell itself because they have no debt and the majority of the stock is owned by the family members of Soichiro Honda, senior management and factory workers. Honda didn't want to incur debt to finance the Ridgeline. So they built a unibody pickup, which isn't a real truck.

If you think about it though the biggest off road dump tucks have no frame either, at least not in the conventional sense.

This brings me to the weight distributing hitch situation.

The whole point of a WDH is to move the apparent weight of the trailer forward of the rear axle and closer to the center of gravity of the tow vehicle.

Honda doesn't forbid a WDH but cautions against it because unibody vehicles don't necessarily have the proper structure to handle the forces. A WDH puts considerable torque on the rear structure of the vehicle. It pushes up on the rear where it is designed to be pulled down and pulls down pretty hard somewhere further forward that isn't necessarily intended to take that much force.

The Ridgeline and other Honda models are designed to take a little weight on the rear but not the torque of a WDH. To use an WDH and not tear the rear off the vehicle it has to move much of the force well forward on the vehicle so that the torque is handled over more of the structure. If the WDH puts it's forces into the suspension mounting points or near them then the body can handle it but if they just attach near the rear with no reinforcement then bad things can happen.
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Old 11-26-2018, 12:32 AM   #37
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If the WDH puts it's forces into the suspension mounting points or near them then the body can handle it but if they just attach near the rear with no reinforcement then bad things can happen.

Which is another way of saying that the WDH receiver has to be installed correctly and Honda didn't have faith that it would be installed correctly.
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Old 11-26-2018, 01:41 AM   #38
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Which is another way of saying that the WDH receiver has to be installed correctly and Honda didn't have faith that it would be installed correctly.
Well, ya, but why use just a few words when many will do?

There are all kinds of people out there who will sell you anything they can. Some will sell a hitch that isn't appropriate for your vehicle. You need one that is big enough to reach where there is strength.

Again, more words than necessary but I just thought someone might like to know what the difference between what is appropriate and what isn't when it comes to installing a WDH on a unibody vehicle.
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Old 11-26-2018, 01:55 AM   #39
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And, I appreciate that. 👍
Too many times I read statements on the web that are like that "telephone" game, where the story changes as it's passed from person to person. Some people seem to like to add drama that wasn't in the source statement.
And, I suspect, in that "telephone" game that some participants change the story intentionally.
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Old 11-26-2018, 07:28 AM   #40
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Which is another way of saying that the WDH receiver has to be installed correctly and Honda didn't have faith that it would be installed correctly.
What Honda actually says in my 2011 Pilot owner's manual is this: "Use of a weight distributing hitch is not recommended because improper adjustment can adversely affect handling, steering, and braking." That seems to point to a concern over improper tensioning. There is no mention of the receiver installation or frame.

In the second generation (2009-2015) the receiver is a factory integrated design included as standard equipment on every Pilot. After I was rear-ended, I got a close-up look at the way it is attached to the rear subframe- bolted to the end rather than from underneath, and it seemed to a non-engineer's eye unsuitable for lifting. Nothing indicates it is rated for WDH.

Starting with the 2016 redesign, Honda returned to a bolt-on accessory receiver on the Pilot. That might open up the possibility of an aftermarket unit rated for WDH. I haven't checked to see what the new owner's manuals say about WDH.
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Old 11-26-2018, 11:36 AM   #41
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Cars never needed frames as they do not carry truck loads.
Today all cars are “unibody” to reduce weight.
Real trucks require frames and the additional weight stabilizes the tow vehicle so it avoids the “ tail wagging the dog” problem often encountered when towing trailers with light weight cars.
Always use the right tool for the job.
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Old 11-26-2018, 11:44 AM   #42
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So, following that logic, a tractor unit of a semi-trailer should be several hundred times heavier than it is, to tow a trailer load of lead ingots.
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