Big Scare last Weekend - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-18-2013, 09:18 AM   #15
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I have those pads on my Mazdaspeed6. They are my 3rd set of pads for the car and my least favorite. They take a few stops to warm up, especially in cold weather. I bled my brakes 3 times thinking there was air in the lines but its just the initial feel of the pads in cold weather compared to my previous pads.

As for brake size, you have been a victim of the dreaded optical illusion.

2008 Dodge Ram 1500 rotor size: 13.230(front) 13.860(rear)
2008 Infiniti G35 rotor size: 12.600(front) 12.110(rear)

I chose 2008 because that's the last year of the G35. Your 2003 only has 11.490 inch front rotors.

The truck brakes look smaller because the wheels are larger. Trucks also have larger rear brakes which will get more use with a full load and heavy tongue weight.
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:23 AM   #16
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Ideally the trailer brakes should be stopping the trailer while the TV brakes stop the TV.
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:28 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by chuyler1 View Post
I have those pads on my Mazdaspeed6. They are my 3rd set of pads for the car and my least favorite. They take a few stops to warm up, especially in cold weather. I bled my brakes 3 times thinking there was air in the lines but its just the initial feel of the pads in cold weather compared to my previous pads.
Wow, that is a nasty report and the 1st negative report I have read about Hawks.

I just replaced my 2nd set of pads and rotors on the G when it had 190,000klm's. That is good service considering 200hr's of towing the 23'. I have found that towing the trailer has no adverse affect on the car's brake wear. The trailer has 4 2X12" drum brakes and when set up right they engage a pinch before the car brakes kick in. Therefore the trailer pulls back on the car when braking which creates the straight line stability when stopping.
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:34 AM   #18
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The truck brakes look smaller because the wheels are larger.
And that is the kicker (another reason why the truck has such long stopping distances). The rims and tires were huge. Anyone who has installed oversized (diameter) tires on a vehicle knows how the braking ability decreases.

Bottom line...... The Dodge has big heavy tires, smallish rotors, and long stopping distances. Not a vehicle you will see parked in my driveway!
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:45 AM   #19
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Regarding the Hawks...
I wouldn't call it nasty, just a different feel. The OEM pads worked best but turned the wheels black a week after washing them. Centric Posi Quiets left virtually no dust but I didn't feel they stopped as well. I've had the Hawks for about 20k and I've gotten used to them. When I drive other vehicles I'm reminded of how slow they are to respond when you first touch the pedal. Once warmed up I'd say they are equivalent to the Posi Quiets as far as performance goes.

Regarding your trailer pulling back...
You don't want the trailer to do too much braking. If it is pulling back on the car it is also pushing down on the tongue and lifting the front wheels. You want to make sure the front end of your TV still dives a little (not a lot) under hard braking so you can steer in an emergency maneuver.

And back to the truck wheel options...
The stopping distance difference between wheel size and weight is negligible compared to overall vehicle weight and tire compound. The Ram 1500 has got to be 1,000 lbs heavier and the fact that it stops only 30ft longer on all season tires compared to the infiniti's summer performance tires isn't half bad. Throw some performance tires on the truck and you'll probably cut that distance in half.
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Old 10-18-2013, 11:19 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by chuyler1 View Post

Regarding your trailer pulling back...
You don't want the trailer to do too much braking. If it is pulling back on the car it is also pushing down on the tongue and lifting the front wheels. You want to make sure the front end of your TV still dives a little (not a lot) under hard braking so you can steer in an emergency maneuver.
Agree! We are on the same page. Correct set up is so important. Also another reason we take advantage of the use of a WDH. It really resists any added tongue weight when braking.
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Old 10-18-2013, 11:42 AM   #21
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. My subaru will stop faster than my pickup all day long. Everything changes with a trailer behind it. Even if it could stop as fast, you would probably be pointed the wrong way, assuming you were even still on the road. .
My experience actually having towed with a Subaru for 6 years has been the opposite of that although it is pulling a trailer thats only a few hundred pounds under its tow cap. Doing 65 mph on a 6% grade (at least) very fast emergency stop -tires screeching - car and trailer stopped perfectly inline & gratefully fast! Unfortunately that's not the only time the vehicle has confirmed it is *very* capable of stopping the trailer in a straight line fast.... the issue with that tow vehicle IMHO is more about getting the trailer up the hill in time for dinner ;-)

I do know though that the Subaru Outback for a smallish sized tug is a bit on the heavy side compared to some other vehicles of the same size. It actually weighs about the same as a Toyota Tacoma and actually outweighs it on some model years.

As others have indicated its not necessarily just about the size of the tug its about the weight of tug itself and the wheel base and many other factors. All vehicles even those of the same size are not created equal. ;-)

As far as who has had their brakes fail on their trailer - I have twice! Once it was caused by the brakes ground wire on the trailer side & as a result was an intermittent problem & the controller showed the brakes to be connected & working as they should. No way to know if the trailers brakes were going to work or not work until the problem was fixed. Actually only suspected the problem when I didnt always feel a bit of a pull back when I did have to do a fairly fast stop. Other wise the car stopped the trailer just fine without any sign the trailer brakes were not working. Under normal braking situations I dont feel a big pull back or tug, only when I have to brake harder than I normally would. Perhaps I dont have it dialed up as high as I should but I dont want or like the trailer doing bunny hops when I put the brakes on which it will and can do if set just slightly higher. The other time I lost trailer brakes was the result of corrosion on the tug connection wiring side. Again all good when I plugged it in & no noticeable difference in stopping power or distant but some time on down the road I glanced down at the controller and happen to note the display was not reading as it should.

I dont advocate the practise of towing trailers over any vehicles tow specifications as I suspect strongly that in such cases that the vehicles ability to stop fast is handicapped by that added weight more than some might like to think. Also like to know that if the brakes on the trailer do fail the tug has at least some hope of stopping the trailer on its own.

Still would like to see a link to the numbers on actual head to head controlled stopping tests while towing trailers of the same size, of the tow vehicles MC1 provided their stopping distance for when not towing. Seeing the differences in stopping distance with a trailer attached vs not attached would to me be an interesting read.
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Old 10-18-2013, 12:12 PM   #22
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An Emergency Stop

We tow a 2400 lb Scamp 16 with a Honda CRV, a light tow vehicle. We had to make one pedal to the metal emergency stop.

A long bed crew cab Chevy truck pulled across two lanes of traffic blocking our way; we were going 55 mph. The tow vehicle and trailer stopped perfectly in a trully hard stop.

We test our trailer brakes every morning when we get moving, activating just the trailer brakes with the brake controller as we leave the campground.

Going down hills we always down shift if we're building too much speed, generally saving the trailer and tow vehicle brakes..
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Old 10-18-2013, 12:15 PM   #23
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I'm sure I read somewhere that brakes are cheaper to replace than transmissions.
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Old 10-18-2013, 01:30 PM   #24
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Going down hills we always down shift if we're building too much speed, generally saving the trailer and tow vehicle brakes..
Yes, that is what the pro's instruct us to do when going down hills. Truckers do the same by using gearing/engine braking.
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Old 10-18-2013, 01:49 PM   #25
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Glenn,

First, the transmission should be designed to handle down shifting on a hill. Second, our Honda recently clicked 200,000 miles, same transmission, same clutch and virtually no repairs and many, many mountain passes towing and not towing.
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Old 10-18-2013, 01:55 PM   #26
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I too downshift as needed down hills, always dropping out of overdrive at least, and even lower if the speed allows. This is where manual transmissions shine, but even automatic transmissions add a good assist too. Plus, it is safer as well, as not only does it assist in the braking, it creates less excess heat on the brakes.
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Old 10-18-2013, 02:03 PM   #27
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Glenn,

I should have started with a bad braking experience. Coming west on route 2 there's a narrow, steep downhill section into Wenatchee, WA. We had our motorhome and counted on our brakes too much. When we reached the bottom, our brakes were really hot. That was our first trip west and taught us that transmissions could be better on downhills than brakes. From that point forward we were big downshifters.

Of course when you get to the bottom of the hill there's no relief because there's a stop sign.
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Old 10-18-2013, 02:29 PM   #28
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A combination of down shifting on hills and use of tug/trailer brakes as required is also my means of dealing with downhill sections. I had a recent "equilibrium" experience towing my Escape on a 25 km long 5% gradient downhill section of Hwy 97C in BC whereby I stayed at a very steady 100 km/hr speed for the entire 25 km downhill section without once having to apply more accelerator or the brakes.
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