Brakes for U-Haul? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-01-2005, 07:20 PM   #15
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Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
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My Sienna is rated for 3500 lb trailer capacity; however, the manual clearly states that trailer brakes are required for heavier trailers in that range - I think the limit without brakes is 2000 lb. The overall trailer weight rating is only one of several limiting factors, and all limits are based on specific operational requirements, often requiring additional equipment such as brakes or a weight-distributing hitch.
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Old 12-01-2005, 09:16 PM   #16
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Thanks everyone for your input. The reason I asked the forum about the brake thing was to get a good idea about what I really need. The consensus of opinion, if I don't have them I wished I would,and when I get them I'll be glad I did. This is all valuable information to me as I live one hour from the nearest small town, and about 100 miles north of Spokane Washington in a log cabin in the Selkirk mountains, near the Canadian border and I have no trailer sales outlet closer than Spokane. As luck would have it, when I bought my egg there was a spare axle and wheel set up complete with new bearings in new condition under the dinette seat. It appears to have a four bolt hookup that hooks to the swing arm and then on the other side, my 5 lug wheel studs; so what I think I will do, is to take that with me, call ahead to someone in Spokane and see if brakes can be fitted to it. I figure between controllers, wiring harnesses, the brakes themselves, and a pull pin disconnect plus labor installation should cost about $400-$500 US. Sounds like a cheap enough deal next to a bad hospital bill or worse putting a ding in my Jeep. Thank you one and all, Jim
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Old 12-01-2005, 09:49 PM   #17
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Jim, that sounds like a reasonable idea, BUT... make sure that the axle will fit the trailer for weight, width, weight rating, and torsion arm angle. There should be a sticker on it somewhere indicating who the manufacturer is. If you can find that and any accompanying numbers, you should be able to contact them for the exact specs of the axle you have in your hand. You don't, for example, really want to put an axle rubbered for 3500 lbs under your UHaul. It'll be way to harsh and beat your egg to death. Conversely, an axle rubbered for 1000lbs would be way under sprung for your needs. Also, the torsion arm angle is signficant as it can range from a -22.5* through a positive 45*. If it's substantially lower than stock, your tires may rub in the wheelwells.

Good luck. Keep us posted!

Roger
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Old 12-01-2005, 10:17 PM   #18
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Quote:
The use of trailer brakes can help prolong the life of the tow vehicle brakes as well as provide for safer operation.
When I first got my Fiber Stream and had my Prodigy installed, I did not have it adjusted properly. It took me several trips, and one panic stop to realize what was wrong. I am now paying for that omission with a front brake replacement on the Odyssey at 45,000 miles.
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Old 12-01-2005, 10:56 PM   #19
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Quit cryin, Freddy.. I put my SECOND set on mine at 60k. Of course, towing was a contributor for sure, but my literal down hill commute doesn't help any.

I am hoping having the Burro set up will slow down the decay of brake pads and my budget.
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Old 12-02-2005, 06:00 AM   #20
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Frederick,
The first time I saw went out to San Francisco/ California mountain area, I said if lived here this would be the place to open a brake and transmission shop.
Although I can't see why improper trailer brake adjustment would kill your front brakes, unless it was over a long peroid of time.
Your post reads, to me anyway, that one panic stop killed them.
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Old 12-02-2005, 07:18 AM   #21
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Quit cryin, Freddy.. I put my SECOND set on mine at 60k. Of course, towing was a contributor for sure, but my literal down hill commute doesn't help any.
Gina, if you BACKED down the mountain to work every other day, your brake pad wear would be much more even, front to back.

Ok... going to my room now...
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Old 12-02-2005, 07:27 AM   #22
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Name: Roger
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Frederick,
Although I can't see why improper trailer brake adjustment would kill your front brakes, unless it was over a long peroid of time.
Pete, when you stop a car, the weight shifts to the front axle for braking, and the front brake pads/shoes take the brunt of the wear. That's why you usually go through two sets of front pads for ever set of rear pads or shoes. When you are trying to stop the car AND a 2500lbs trailer, that additional weight is transferred to the front brakes as well if the trailer isn't braking for itself. The amount of time that the pads are in contact with the rotors and the pressure used on the brake pads to the rotors both increase on each stop you make. If those stops are from freeway speeds, or on long down-hills as you'd find in the mountains, each stop significantly puts more stress and wear on those pads. Frederick took at least one long cross-country trip with the Fiberstream in tow. It is possible under those circumstances to put some serious wear on a set of front brake pads.

WITH trailer brakes, the trailer weight is stopped by it's own brakes and if the controller is set properly, the trailer brakes will actually begin to stop the tow vehicle before the tow vehicle's brakes are applied to any great extent which limits the weight shift to the front of the tow vehicle. I suppose that it's possible that towing a trailer with properly set up brakes could actually extend the life of your tow vehicle's front brakes by wearing your trailer brakes first!

Roger
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