Eggcamper Weight, Tongue Weight & Towing with Outback - Page 5 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-24-2015, 12:14 PM   #57
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Name: Ray
Trailer: 2017 Scamp 16 Deluxe
Missouri
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Denny,

Although we would sometimes like to have some of the additional
storage space and a bathroom (or a room with a door for a Thetford
cassette toilet or porta-potti) that come with a larger trailer, I guess
that is why I am kind of glad we currently have a minimum-weight
13 ft Scamp. At some point, we hope to criss-cross the country and
if gas prices go back up, fuel economy might become important to us?

Coming back from Houston last weekend (from Joplin [Mo] to the KC
metro), we actually were reading 25 mpg (on the Ford dash meter)
towing at 59 mph (on cruise). (Towing at 62+ mph, we have typically
been getting around 21.7 or 21.8 mpg, so the 25 mpg was a rather
pleasant surprise. )

Along with speed - cold temperatures, headwinds, very hilly terrain,
snow, high humidity (heavy rain or even mist), and ethanol in the fuel
all seem to negatively affect our Ecoboost 2.0L fuel economy.

Along with past education and personal experience, some of my ideas
on towing (horsepower versus torque) and the Ford Ecoboost 2.0L
engine are included in the following links:

Towing - horsepower versus torque
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/towing/towing-capacity/information/horsepower-versus-torque1.htm 

Stout EcoBoost I-4 Plays Well Above Weight Class
http://wardsauto.com/vehicles-amp-technology/stout-ecoboost-i-4-plays-well-above-weight-class

Ray

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Old 03-24-2015, 12:38 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uplander View Post
Since RV Trailer owners tend to tow many miles very year long term reliability is important.
As with any vehicle...NEVER EXCEED MFGR's TOW RATINGS.
Reliability is very important. As tow vehicles both our Nissan mini van and G35 sedan have been very reliable considering being used as a TV and towing for many kilometers.
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Old 03-24-2015, 12:57 PM   #59
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Name: Patrick
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New York
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It should never be about gas mileage...safety and comfort should come first.

Back in 1987 my family of 4 set off on a once in a lifetime RV adventure.
Two years to both plan and reserve sites at National Parks via the U.S. Mail
(This was pre-Internet)... Departing from Connecticut we traveled thru NY, PA,
OHIO, INDIANA, ILL, Wisconsin, Iowa, The Dakotas, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming,
Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri etc.
The trip took 6 weeks. We visited more National Parks than I can recall. Took hundreds of photos. My wife was a school teacher and insisted we keep daily journals with our observations. Seems we recorded a lot of details. I read those journals the other day...Oh! The memories. The interesting point was neither i or my wife recorded any costs. Not one note about fuel costs...none about the cost for camp sites. I did record some mileage notes but no gas costs....interesting....the real important things should never be about money but rather the memories our RV adventures create!
MPG???.....no just remember the memories per mile.

Happy Camping!
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Old 03-24-2015, 01:27 PM   #60
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Name: Ray
Trailer: 2017 Scamp 16 Deluxe
Missouri
Posts: 504
Patrick,

In large measure, I completely agree with you. 😊

The counterpoint to that idea comes from my friend (Wayne) who owns a larger
and heavier "stickie". He told me that, with fuel economy of about 8 mpg, that
for trips of over 200 miles it was just cheaper for them to "motel it".

I suspect that many of us own various FGRVs precisely because we do not want
fuel expense to become a deciding factor (or maybe even come to mind) when deciding
whether to make trips of any duration/distance. At least, that is/was part of my own
FGRV purchase decision thinking.

As always, YMMV. 😊

Ray




Sent from my iPad using Fiberglass RV
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Old 03-24-2015, 02:06 PM   #61
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Not all "Stickie" TT were created equal.
When my wife and I decided to return to the RV life last year I was lucky enough to find a 2001 R-Vision 26 ft. Trail-Lite Travel Trailer. This one suited our needs and was is "as-new" condition and priced way below anything we had seen while looking @ just $5,000. It was well under the tow capacity of my Toyota FJ Landcruiser's 5,000 lb. tow rating. This Metal framed, low profile Unit had fiberglass skin and a sealed under carriage. Loaded with full bath with tub and shower, A/C, furnace, well equipped kitchen, lots of storage, TV antenna and outside shower plus an outside portable gas grill.
The dry weight of this unit was 3370 lbs. Even after filling the 30 gal water tank and twin propane tanks and adding our stuff it stil was under my tow weight maximum target of 5,000 lbs.
This unit tows like a dream. I only had to replace the 4 tires that were original and too old for safe operation.
Truth be told there are light weight units out there that are not molded fiberglass.
Sad note: The parent company of R-Vision decided last year to give up making Towable units to concentrate on Custom Luxury Motor Home sales. The did make a high quality unit while it lasted.

Happy Camping.
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Old 03-24-2015, 02:43 PM   #62
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Clip......[QUOTE=Uplander;511692]Not all "Stickie" TT were created equal.
When my wife and I decided to return to the RV life last year I was lucky enough to find a 2001 R-Vision 26 ft. Trail-Lite Travel Trailer. ....
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Me thinks that you were very fortunate in finding an "Older-in-Sticky-terms" trailer that obviously received much better care than the average stick built receives over it's expected life span. As I'm guessing that it also came from the northeast, I'd bet that it had inside storage most of it's life, especially in the winter.


Without proper care, all those edges would have become leaks, fortunately the p.o.(s) recognized that and took good care of your rig.
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Old 03-24-2015, 02:53 PM   #63
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Some facts: only outside storage. Original owner lived in northern Vermont.
Trailer is in mint condition.
Seems like you are somehow convinced that all stickies self-distruct in a few years...NOT TRUE.
My neighbor has a Sun Line stickie built in the 1980s and it is still in top condition.

R-Vision Trailers garranteed the roof system for 12 years.

There are thousands of stickie trailers out there in fantastic shape dispite their age!
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Old 03-24-2015, 03:25 PM   #64
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Just about any RV, given proper care, can enjoy a long and useful life. However, when the owner chooses to not take care, the sticky will be long gone before the typical FGRV starts to show unrepairable damage.


It's a lot more about longevity than just construction. One will require considerably more care to survive 20-40 years than the other.


And I really don't think that many on this site consider any 4000+ lb RV to be "Lite".
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Old 03-24-2015, 03:54 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MCDenny View Post
Seems towing a typical 2500#ish FGRV almost everyone gets 14 - 16 mpg. Doesn't matter much what they tow with.


Denny Wolfe
www.wanderingourway.wordpress.com
We towed with a 2004 Honda CRV for 7 years all over NA and averaged 20-22 mpg, lower with s little box trailer and higher with the fiberglass trailers, each FRV weighed 2600#s or more . With our Odyssey we have averaged 19 mpg so far towing our Scamp 16..
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Old 03-24-2015, 06:27 PM   #66
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16 litres/100 km is 14.7 mpg US and 17.7 mpg Imp.

About what my F350 4x4 crew cab longbox diesel gets while towing!!!
Paul you are correct!! I got myself all messed up going form US to Imp... and back LOL to much math!
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Old 03-24-2015, 08:06 PM   #67
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And I really don't think that many on this site consider any 4000+ lb RV to be "Lite".
IMHO....

Ultra Lite... 500 to 1,500lbs
Lite..... 1,500 to 4,500lbs
Med weight...4,500 to 6,500lbs
Heavy.... 6,500 to 10,000lbs
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Old 03-24-2015, 08:23 PM   #68
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Hmmmmm, that's one vote..... LOL
Sounds like:
a) An extra category, ultra lite, that includes everything up to and including 13' FGRV's, had to be inverted.
b) It was invented by someone wanting to justify stickies as being "Lite",
c) It is a relative term, such as when larger towables, such as Airstreams, are the basic reference.
or
d) The word "Lite" only refers to certain beers and is really not the word used to designate that some towables are indeed "Light" in weight.
Perhaps a source for the schedule can be specified.


BTW: There is a sticky line called "Feather Lite", they start at about 3500 lbs.,
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Old 03-24-2015, 08:31 PM   #69
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According to the weight table posted here on the forum, the mean weight is 2600 lbs. I think a better classification is the up to 3500 lbs for light-weight, up to 5000 lbs for mid-weght and
anything over that is heavy-weight. This more or less follows the industry standard for hitches and so on.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:23 AM   #70
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Name: Patrick
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Are you serious????.....a 20-40 year old RV???....don't forget to apply for a special "antique" license plate when you register it!

I live in a 230 year old historic home and it needs constant repairs, updating and general maintenance. You have to love history to purchase such a home.
The idea of owning an antique travel trailer without a proper civilized bathroom and kitchen does not appeal to me. My goal when traveling is comfort and not an endurance test for the sake of a few hundred pounds. Enjoy your 20-40 year old
FGRV.
Thank you Wayne (MC1) for supplying the weight classifications for RV Travel Trailers. I attended an RV show a few weeks ago...hundreds of RVs on display.
I did note that most did weigh more than the same sized unit did 10+ years ago.
Not one molded fiberglass maker on display. I wanted to see what one would cost with a full bath with shower, full kitchen, A/C and furnace, hot water heater, twin propane tanks and television antenna system just to compare costs.
I did note almost all "stickie" Travel Trailers came equipped with all the above which was nice as there was no need to order them as options.
Many (not all) were equipped with awnings too! Most also came with a 10 or 12 year leak-proof warranty on the roofing system. Interiors were better than most high-end homes. Almost all came with slide outs standard. Prices started at $8,995 (show specials). Impressive displays....the RV has come a long way!

Happy Camping!
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