Emergency Jack - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-29-2011, 08:07 AM   #1
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Name: Kip
Trailer: 2003 Casita 17' SD Deluxe, Towed by '09 Honda Ridgeline.
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Emergency Jack

My 03 Casita came with an 08 Carlisle tire on the curb side, an 06 Maxxis on the road side, and an 02 Marathon on the spare.

Pulled off the Carlisle and the Marathon and replaced them with two new Maxxis, which are on the ground and the older Maxxis is now the spare.

Used a 2 ton floor jack to replace the Carlisle. Then went to the street side and decided to try the sizzor jack, as that is what I had planned for our "Emergency" Jack.

The jack handle that comes with those jacks worked fine to push up against the frame. Then WHOA! It ain't gona turn any farther. The head on the jack screw has a hole in the middle for it's handle, and the outside of the head is hexagon. Used the 4 way lug wrench but it was terribly slow as it would only turn a 1/4 turn or so before hitting the ground. Went to a 1/2" drive ratchet and socket which worked OK but still not much of a turn as one hand stablized the 10" extention while the other hand cranked. Got it up and changed the tire. Jacking down was almost as much work as going up. Can't even imagine lifting the heavier curb side.

I have a 2 ton hydraulic bottle jack that would have made the job much easier, but the head of the screw/shaft that pushes up against the load is so small, 3/4" or so, and the trailer frame so narrow, it seems unsafe.

Does someone sell bottle jacks with an enlarged base and shaft head, that will fit under the frame when the tire is flat, yet jack up high enough to change the tire?

What jack are you folks using for emergency tire changes?

Thanks,
Kip
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Old 01-29-2011, 08:45 AM   #2
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This Lo-Profile Hydraulic Jack should do the Job Sits low about 5 1/4" high and has a double piston to bring it up to 15 3/8" high..... This was recommended on the casita site and i really need to get one myself.
Hope this helps,
Joe

Torin Double Ram Bottle Jack ó 4-Ton, Model# TF0402 | Bottle Jacks | Northern Tool + Equipment
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Old 01-29-2011, 11:04 AM   #3
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I have always used a 12 Vdc sissors jack.

Like this Harbor Freight 12V Scissor Jack from Harbor Freight.
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Old 01-29-2011, 12:06 PM   #4
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Name: George
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Quick jack.

For changing a wheel I use the quick jack which goes under an axle and by pulling forward you lift the axle. I used it a few times on my 21RB Bigfoot. It is quick and stable but it is very helpful to be told when to stop.
George.
Quick Change Trailer Jack
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Old 01-29-2011, 03:57 PM   #5
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Name: Kevin (Ken)
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Personally, I think the only kind of jack that is worth owning is a real floor jack. Other types of jack just seem like toys, and when I have a flat tire, the last thing I want is to mess around with a toy masquerading as a tool. They are easy to use, work on uneven surfaces, have an inherently wide base, and even self-center due to the wheels. They make small ones that can easily be stored in a vehicle or storage compartment, like this one:

Amazon.com: 'Jack-in-a-Box' 2-Ton 4000 Lb Lift Capacity Easy-Carry Hydraulic Jack with Storage Case: Home Improvement
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Old 01-29-2011, 03:58 PM   #6
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My truck is pretty high, so I have this one:

Amazon.com: Torin T83006 3 Ton SUV Service Jack: Automotive
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:22 PM   #7
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This thread seems to have evolved into a thread about jacking tow vehicles not trailers. I assume you have jacking the tow vehicle covered, so back to the trailer... On my Scamp I can lower the tongue to get as much height in the rear as possible, lower the rear stabilizer jacks and then raise the tongue until the wheels are of the ground. Would this work for you?
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RB437 View Post
This thread seems to have evolved into a thread about jacking tow vehicles not trailers. I assume you have jacking the tow vehicle covered, so back to the trailer... On my Scamp I can lower the tongue to get as much height in the rear as possible, lower the rear stabilizer jacks and then raise the tongue until the wheels are of the ground. Would this work for you?
NOT a good idea. The frame isn't built to use the stabilizers on the rear to hold the weight like this. You're liable to end up with cracks, breaks or tweaks to the frame. You want to jack the trailer as close to the axle as possible, without being on the axle.
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:01 PM   #9
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Name: Kevin (Ken)
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Also, I think most tongue jacks on these trailers are only 2000# capacity, unless you or someone upgraded to the 5000# model. If the jack failed while your trailer was suspended in air, the consequences could be even more damaging to the trailer and possibly even life-threatening... same goes for the possibility of it tipping or falling, as you'd have a pretty narrow triangular base overall and stabilizing jacks generally aren't omni-directionally stable.

I'd say the safe way is to double-chock the opposite wheel, jack it up with a real, stable jack near the wheel (i.e. not a bottle jack, side ratchet jack or puny scissor jack). Then, stabilize the lifted side with a couple of stabilizer jacks before you put any body parts or tools under the side.
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:32 PM   #10
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I'm confused, why couldn't you use the scissor jack? was the handle missing? Iv'e never had trouble with one.
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:31 PM   #11
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Greg.... I'm not sure about the others but when i have a flat tire and the scissor jack has to be fully down to get it under a jacking point it is at it's worst position to crank it up and is downright rough to get it up.....now a tire that has air in it and the scissor jack is cranked up some to meet the jacking point it will lift a lot easier. Many scissor jack instructions show the maximum strength when it is elevated a few inches first, then put under a load.
Joe
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:34 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Joe Z View Post
Greg.... I'm not sure about the others but when i have a flat tire and the scissor jack has to be fully down to get it under a jacking point it is at it's worst position to crank it up and is downright rough to get it up.....now a tire that has air in it and the scissor jack is cranked up some to meet the jacking point it will lift a lot easier. Many scissor jack instructions show the maximum strength when it is elevated a few inches first, then put under a load.
Joe
Yes I can see that could be a problem.
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Old 01-30-2011, 05:49 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg H View Post
I'm confused, why couldn't you use the scissor jack? was the handle missing? Iv'e never had trouble with one.
Greg,

The handle that came with the sizzor jack works OK for a light load,.like jacking it up to meet the trailer frame. And maybe lift it a couple of inches. From that point on the offset in the handle just doesn't offer enough of a mechanical advantage to lift much weight.

Apparently the jack maker relized the problem and welded a lug on the end of the screw. One of the 4 way's "sockets" fits that lug. Probably by design. But being so close to the ground the 4 way allows very little motion, about 1/4 turn. So I went to the ratchet with an extention that would reach the jack and the ratchet itself being where I could turn it. This increased the range of motion to about 1 o'clock to 5 o'clock. Used the right hand to crank and the left to stabilize the ratchet and keep the jack from twisting around on the ground. It was still a tough crank.
Probably an extention bar on the ratchet would have helped.

Keeping in mind I was dealing with fully inflated tires. If the tire had been flat, the jack would have started out even lower and harder to screw, as Joe pointed out. Also I was working on the lighter side of the trailer.

Then after wrestling with the tire change, the thing had to be screwed back down. There was more time and energy consumed with the jacking part than with the tire changing.

Thanks,
Kip
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Old 01-30-2011, 06:11 AM   #14
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I use a hydraulic scissor jack that seems like the best of both to me.
It clears the spots under the trailer where I need it to fit but then it jacks uo with the hydraulic action and advantage.

Trouble is I can not seem to find these anymore?
I hope there is no good reason I should know about and don't.

Got ot at Walmart but now they don't seem to have them.
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