Engine Cooler for an old trooper - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-17-2013, 03:59 PM   #15
Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: 1978 Scamp 13'
Oregon
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
Even I have done both, so I know it's not hard, truly.
I have the mechanics manual and some handy people I can ask for help from around here so I'm going to try to do it myself before we get back on the road. Thanks for the encouragement!
__________________

__________________
Lisallison is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 05:16 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Jon Vermilye's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21
Oswego, NY
Posts: 1,407
Registry
A friend had a Trooper & rigged a sprayer for the radiator. Might not help in your case, but for climbing Colorado jeep trails in low, low it did the trick. Of course that might also have had something to do with the fact that it was at 11,000' +.
__________________

Jon Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 05:33 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Go to a local auto supply store (AutoZone, if there is one up there) and borrow a "Block Tester" from them. You put it on top of your radiator and put a special detector chemical in the device. If there are any damaged head gasket(s) or head cracks it will detect any exhaust gas getting in the coolent, telling you if you have a head gasket problem. BTW: Also do a compression check and look for any cylinder more than about 25% lower than the others.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2013, 07:32 PM   #18
Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: 1978 Scamp 13'
Oregon
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
Go to a local auto supply store (AutoZone, if there is one up there) and borrow a "Block Tester" from them. You put it on top of your radiator and put a special detector chemical in the device. If there are any damaged head gasket(s) or head cracks it will detect any exhaust gas getting in the coolent, telling you if you have a head gasket problem. BTW: Also do a compression check and look for any cylinder more than about 25% lower than the others.
I will try to get. The block tester. I've never heard of that so I definitely haven't done it. I got a compression test in February and i don't remember the numbers but it was good. Not like new but great for a car with 260 k.
__________________
Lisallison is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2013, 07:37 PM   #19
Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: 1978 Scamp 13'
Oregon
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Vermilye View Post
A friend had a Trooper & rigged a sprayer for the radiator. Might not help in your case, but for climbing Colorado jeep trails in low, low it did the trick. Of course that might also have had something to do with the fact that it was at 11,000' +.
A sprayer? What type of sprayer? I have been and will again at the end of the summer be driving through some big mountain ranges in Alaska so if it helps at high altitudes that would be great! I also read something somewhere online about a guy using styrofoam insulation stuff to help funnel the air more directly into the radiator. That sounded like it might help too?
__________________
Lisallison is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2013, 10:49 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
floyd's Avatar
 
Name: Floyd
Trailer: 2004 13 ft Scamp Custom Deluxe
IllAnnoy
Posts: 6,049
Registry
if the temp guage suddenly climbed with no other symptoms, be sure the sending unit isn't bad or the wire to it getting an intermittant ground.
__________________
floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2013, 12:47 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 6,309
Registry
Do that have an electric fan or fan clutch?
I had some radiator work done on car I once had. They neglected to plug the fan back in. I discover it going over a mountain pass here in Oregon.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2013, 08:20 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Google "Radiator Water Sprayers" for a bunch of hits and ideas: Here's the link
radiator water sprayer - Google Search

But that is more of a Band-Aid for an underlaying problem and isn't something usually needed for driving anywhere north of the 39th parallel, much less in Alaska.

Even in 2013 the Alaska hiway is littered(?) with RV's and vehicles that didn't make it and/or owners who couldn't afford emergency repairs along the way. It's not what it was on my first trip up in 1968, but it's not the I-5 either.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2013, 10:09 AM   #23
Member
 
Name: Ron
Trailer: 2004 trillium outback
Alaska
Posts: 31
Registry
I noticed that you said the temp jumped once. Have you thought of the sensor just being erratic or off? Or are there signs of actual overheating that would rule that out.
__________________
Ak Ron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 03:13 PM   #24
Member
 
John Campbell's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp 13 ft 1990
NW Wyoming
Posts: 33
I regularly tow my 13' Scamp up long and steep upgrades in hot weather with a 4 cylinder '91 Trooper. I did initially have to watch my temperature gauge carefully, but usually managed to get up 8 miles of 10% grade without having to pull over. It always made me nervous. I replaced my radiator after it developed a major leak. Now I have no problem at all. While I continue to watch my gauge as a precaution, it never approaches anything I would think of as the worry stage. I would recommend replacing the radiator if you can afford it and not worry about temporary fixes.

The new radiator certainly doesn't get me out of 1st and 2nd gear for the climb, but I no longer worry how far it is to the next safe pullout.
__________________
John Campbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 05:11 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
Posts: 1,418
I would also have your fan checked. If electrical control the sensors for the fan could be bad. If mechanical check to see if you have a clutch fan. This type has a thermal control built in the hub to lock the fan on when it see heat if cool it free spins saving gas. Failure of this fan attachment will cause heating issues. With the motor cold remove the radiator cap. stick a candy thermometer in the coolant and start the engine as the motor warms up check the coolant temperature reading on the thermometer against the guage on the dash and see if they are close. will also be able to detect when the thermosata opens up and at what temperature.
only one place worse than Alaska to overheat and thats in Death Valley. But at least in Death Valley if on the main road a Sheriff will drive buy several times a day.
__________________
stevebaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 06:58 PM   #26
Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: 1978 Scamp 13'
Oregon
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebaz View Post
I would also have your fan checked. If electrical control the sensors for the fan could be bad. If mechanical check to see if you have a clutch fan. This type has a thermal control built in the hub to lock the fan on when it see heat if cool it free spins saving gas. Failure of this fan attachment will cause heating issues. With the motor cold remove the radiator cap. stick a candy thermometer in the coolant and start the engine as the motor warms up check the coolant temperature reading on the thermometer against the guage on the dash and see if they are close. will also be able to detect when the thermosata opens up and at what temperature.
only one place worse than Alaska to overheat and thats in Death Valley. But at least in Death Valley if on the main road a Sheriff will drive buy several times a day.
Our thermostate gauge in the car doesnt have exact readings on temp. What should the average mid temp of a car be? and at what temp is it too hot? I will figure it out before the long drive. I'm not too worried about breaking down on the alcan. All the people who have driven it recently tell me there are gas stations at regular intervals and you don't pass someone who is broken down without stopping to help. So it won't be a life or death situation. We also drive slow, have lots of emergency stuff and will never drive after dark.
__________________
Lisallison is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 07:41 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Name: Richard
Trailer: Trillium 1300 Nor'Easter Egg '06 Ranger Supercab 3.0L auto
Newfoundland
Posts: 151
Send a message via Skype™ to Richard Hayes
Cooling System

The system basically consists of the radiator, a thermostat, the water pump and possibly an electric fan - I'd have all of them checked out by a competent mechanic at the first sign of overheating. The thermostat is the lowest cost, then the rad, then the water pump - not sure where a fan fits on the cost curve.. If you swap out the rad, be sure to replace the hoses and the clamps - adds little to the bill, but can save your motor - things go west awfully fast when a hose blows. I'd also be inclined to replace the sensor.

While it's good to know that folks will stop and help in a remote area, there isn't much they can do than offer you a lift to civilization if the motor's fried. Seized pistons, bent rods, burnt bearings, blown head gaskets - after you've gotten the rig towed to a decent garage, it's gonna cost mucho money to get those types of problems sorted out, after the mechanic sources the '86 parts and has them shipped in. Then consider how many Trooper motors are there in junkyards along the way (darned few!), and what shape are they in?

Good cooling and clean oil are the lifeblood of an engine, especially one that's been banging away faithfully for 260,000 miles. Me, I'd rather pay right up front to make sure my cooling system is as close to bulletproof as possible before heading out that particular highway.
__________________
Richard Hayes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2013, 11:36 PM   #28
Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: 1978 Scamp 13'
Oregon
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Hayes View Post
The system basically consists of the radiator, a thermostat, the water pump and possibly an electric fan - I'd have all of them checked out by a competent mechanic at the first sign of overheating. The thermostat is the lowest cost, then the rad, then the water pump - not sure where a fan fits on the cost curve.. If you swap out the rad, be sure to replace the hoses and the clamps - adds little to the bill, but can save your motor - things go west awfully fast when a hose blows. I'd also be inclined to replace the sensor.

While it's good to know that folks will stop and help in a remote area, there isn't much they can do than offer you a lift to civilization if the motor's fried. Seized pistons, bent rods, burnt bearings, blown head gaskets - after you've gotten the rig towed to a decent garage, it's gonna cost mucho money to get those types of problems sorted out, after the mechanic sources the '86 parts and has them shipped in. Then consider how many Trooper motors are there in junkyards along the way (darned few!), and what shape are they in?

Good cooling and clean oil are the lifeblood of an engine, especially one that's been banging away faithfully for 260,000 miles. Me, I'd rather pay right up front to make sure my cooling system is as close to bulletproof as possible before heading out that particular highway.
As I said, I'm going to figure out and fix the problem before we leave on the trip and of course we get the oil changed and all other fluids on a regular basis. We also already changed all the hoses, belts, breaks stuff and got the whole car checked out compression test and all before heading out. However even with all that no guarantee my car won't break down. If I wanted to be more sure we wouldn't get stranded then I would buy a new car which would be generally more reliable. I would rather gamble on the alcan in my old beater that I've done my best to maintain than the monthly certainty of car payments. Thanks for the advice. I'll be heading to a mechanic for a check up and now he can't screw me over since I have more of an idea of what is what when I talk to him. Then I might take it home and fix it if its something simple or get it fixed there.
__________________

__________________
Lisallison is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Engine oil rgrugg Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 40 05-11-2013 11:14 PM
State Trooper Bruce H Jokes, Stories & Tall Tales 2 03-27-2011 07:35 AM
Tacoma 2.7 4cyl. engine Paddy Morris General Chat 15 04-21-2008 11:45 PM
99 Isuzu Trooper as tow vehicle? Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.