F150 for towing Scamp 13, no bath. - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-02-2016, 10:14 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
Yes, as mentioned in my last post
After you edited it to add that information?
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Old 01-02-2016, 10:38 PM   #16
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I just checked the three US manufacturer's Trailer Towing Guides, and found three different recommendations for how to react to trailer sway.

Ford - as I quoted above

Chevy - take foot off accelerator, apply trailer brakes until sway stops, apply TV brakes to stop.

Ram - take foot off accelerator, do not brake or speed up.

Interesting.
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Old 01-02-2016, 11:00 PM   #17
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And nobody suggested loading the trailer so that sway doesn't occur in the first place?

I've only experience sway ( briefly ) and it was when I stupidly decided I'd been following a motor home that was traveling under the speed limit for way too long. I pulled out to pass on a two lane road and it was taking longer than I anticipated ( or he sped up ). Anyway, with approaching vehicles, I had to swing back into the proper lane, resulting in a brief moment of sway. At no time was the sway ( if that's what it was ) a concern to me. I just wanted to avoid a head-on collision.
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Old 01-03-2016, 01:17 AM   #18
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So back to the poll, have you ever applied the theory in practice?
No, but I sure could have used the manual brake lever with a utility (no brakes) trailer once. No harm/no foul but a great learning experience with side to side loading weight. Sometimes you don't see the forest for the trees. Was shocked to see the right trailer fender from the drivers side mirror and I was only doing 40mph . Letting off the gas worked for me in that case. Might be a bit off subject but how you may have to control sway would depend on conditions and speed. I don't think there is any one correct answer for everything that may come up.
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Old 01-03-2016, 01:46 AM   #19
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I did once find my tent trailer coming up alongside my Subaru wagon on a corner, on gravel washboard. Stomped on the gas and being front-wheel-drive, the Subie managed to beat the trailer around the corner.
Had no trailer brakes or controller, so that was my only option, besides driving sensibly.
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Old 01-03-2016, 03:39 AM   #20
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I always understood that applying the trailer brakes was a good option if the trailer began to sway, however the Ford Trailer Towing Guide contradicts this. Perhaps it has something to do with the Ford automatic sway control. This is the quote from Ford:

– If your trailer starts to sway, apply brake pedal
gradually. The sliding lever on the TBC should
be used only for manual activation of trailer
brakes when adjusting the gain. Misuse, such
as application during trailer sway, could cause
instability of trailer and/or tow vehicle
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ford is only contradicting what has been a general practice for more than 50 years. If this causes a problem with their sway control system I would get an answer from Ford as to WHAT & WHY![/QUOTE]




Yes, I believe some Fords have a controller set-up that automatically applies trailer brakes when sway is detected.
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Old 01-03-2016, 07:12 AM   #21
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So back to the poll, have you ever applied the theory in practice?
I have Glenn.
When traveling through the Rockies you can not predict what's around the next curve even on a 4 lane. Yes I was going slowly in the right downhill lane. I encountered a very slick section where mud/clay had washed across leaving a thin film right where the highway took its sharpest turn. The sway began where the slick ended.
So yes, I did and it worked! Judging from the number of cars and trailers kissing the left guardrail I fared better than most.
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Old 01-03-2016, 07:37 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Cathi View Post
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ford is only contradicting what has been a general practice for more than 50 years. If this causes a problem with their sway control system I would get an answer from Ford as to WHAT & WHY!



Yes, I believe some Fords have a controller set-up that automatically applies trailer brakes when sway is detected.[/QUOTE]

My understanding, from reading the manuals and watching videos, is that the Ford anti sway includes a sensor that detects yaw forces coming from the trailer. It then decreases engine power and applies the brakes to individual TV wheels to counter the detected yaw. Apparently, it also can apply the trailer brakes automatically if you have the factory brake controller. I believe this comes standard on all all the newer Fords that have any kind of hitch (bumper hitch on the F150) whether they have a tow package or not. Ram also has a similar system, but their's does not incorporate trailer brakes.

I have also read, however, that this is a last resort, save your butt system that requires quite severe trailer sway to kick in. Most of the advice has been to use other, conventional, anti sway devices and proper loading to prevent the situation from developing in the first place.

Perhaps it would still be acceptable to manually apply the trailer brakes to correct less severe sway, but keep your hands off the controller once the automatic system has kicked in. I think this is the tact I would take, based on what I think I understand. :-)
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Old 01-03-2016, 08:33 AM   #23
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I am sure that your information is correct for Michigan, but as some states, such as California set the limit at 1500 lbs., and NY sets it at 1000 lbs., there must be a reason for the lower limits that has been learned from experience in those states. I'd opt for safety and would never tow a trailer weighing even 1500 lbs, much less close to 3000 lbs., without brakes.
I'm thankful for this thread.

My trailer is the 78 Trillium 15 foot that Randy Bishop sold me. While I don't know the exact weight of the trailer and camper I think they are under 1.5K and my 2000 Ford F150 should be able to tow it. I am going to California so am glad to read these limits.
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Old 01-03-2016, 11:30 AM   #24
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So back to the poll, have you ever applied the theory in practice?
Apply manually electric brakes on the trailer, is a practice to do occasionally.
Between 500 and 1000 miles.
It is suggested in the instructions that accompany the installation of these and I also read on the internet to conduct the audit in a large commercial parking when empty, traveling at 30 m/hr and the apply to the max to make sure they work well.

By practicing this gesture, the reflex will be automatic if necessary ...
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Old 01-03-2016, 11:51 AM   #25
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Apply manually electric brakes on the trailer, is a practice to do occasionally.
Between 500 and 1000 miles.
It is suggested in the instructions that accompany the installation of these and I also read on the internet to conduct the audit in a large commercial parking when empty, traveling at 30 m/hr and the apply to the max to make sure they work well.

By practicing this gesture, the reflex will be automatic if necessary ...
Your last line hits it on the head. When you learn what the manual controller can do, you are much more apt to use it as an automatic response.

I do find it interesting that the three truck makers all have different answers though.
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Old 01-03-2016, 02:36 PM   #26
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Tranny /Brakes

The F150 will have no problem towing the 13'er and will not need a tranny cooler.
If you have Ford install a brake controller it will cost twice as much as a Prodigy controller of which you can buy on line and also get a harness/connector on Amazon for probably 20 bucks that hooks in up under the dash,plenty of wire to mount the controller where ever you like. The entire job done in an hour.
Take a look at the
hitch,maybe stamped or decal with the class and type.
I pull a 2014 17 Casita with my 2014 Chevy Silverado with the V6 up and down those Colorado Hills no problem.
Sway bar might be nice if not enough load on the hitch. Tow it and experiment,see if she tows in a straight line.

My 2 cents

Good luck,

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Old 01-03-2016, 04:04 PM   #27
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Tranny cooler

This is just me, but I would add the tranny cooler. I base this on the advice that I received several years ago after my Dodge 1500 p/u transmission had to be rebuilt at 120K miles. This truck did have a tow package, but not an auxiliary transmission cooler.

When I went to the transmission shop to pick up the truck (and write out a check for just north of $2000), I asked the tech, "How can I make this transmission last as long as possible?" He didn't miss a beat, but immediately told me there were 3 things I could do to extend the life of my rebuilt transmission:

1. Add an auxilary transmission cooler (which they did as part of the rebuild)
2. Service the transmission as specified in the owners manual (fluid and filter change every 40K miles)
3. Kick the transmission out of overdrive if I'm towing anything, carrying more than 300-400 lbs extra weight, going up-hill, or driving into a strong headwind.

I've followed their advice and have put over 180,000 additional miles on that rebuilt transmission.

Transmission coolers are cheap compared to a transmission re-build!

Good luck!
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Old 01-03-2016, 04:27 PM   #28
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Don't sweat the small stuff!
An F150 will not even notice the load of pulling a 13 ft trailer.
And you don't need trailer brakes, as long as you have a tight hitch, and perhaps an anti sway bar. Just make sure the height of the hitch ball keeps the trailer level or slightly lower in front.
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