Ford Transit 2.2l Diesel - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-28-2012, 05:27 PM   #15
Raz
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I'm confused. I thought the Transit was the small van imported from Turkey with back seats to avoid Ford having to pay the chicken tax and marketed as a local delivery van. This sounds like something much bigger. Nice to see a small diesel.
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:57 PM   #16
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I'm confused. I thought the Transit was the small van imported from Turkey with back sets to avoid Ford having to pay the chicken tax and marketed as a local delivery van. This sounds like something much bigger. Nice to see a small diesel.
You are thinking of the Transit Connect. The Transit is a full size van long sold in Europe and now replacing the Econoline.
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:59 PM   #17
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The Turkish one is Transit Connect with 2l gas engine. Transit is similar in size to MB Sprinter or new Nissan Van. I read some conflicting reports about the engine size, some say 2.2l diesel which is used in Europe but some say 3.5 diesel 5 in line for USA. We will know for certain once Ford will release spec instead of this trickling marketing by anxiety.

More vans in this size will result in higher level competition between Sprinter, Nissan, Transit, and hopefully coming to our shores Fiat/Dodge Ducato.

George.
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Old 03-28-2012, 07:06 PM   #18
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If they ever put a small diesel in the "Connect".....they wont be able to keep em on the shelves.
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:18 PM   #19
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A van that gets 35 mpg on the highway... wow! Um, are the UK gallons the same size as US gallons (i.e. 4 quarts), or imperial gallons like in Canada?

I could use one of those jumbos. But doggone it, I really like AWD too, and they say it will be RWD-only in the US.
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:29 PM   #20
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A van that gets 35 mpg on the highway... wow! Um, are the UK gallons the same size as US gallons (i.e. 4 quarts), or imperial gallons like in Canada?

I could use one of those jumbos. But doggone it, I really like AWD too, and they say it will be RWD-only in the US.
UK gal is 1.201 US gal which makes 35mpg UK to 29.2 mpg US, still good for a large vehicle.

George.
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:15 PM   #21
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I just shake my head when the Gov't mandates 54 mpg CAFE standards. Despite all the hype, mileage has NOT improved all that much.

My first car was a 1959 TR10 Triumph Estate Wagon. I got 36mpg at 65, 32mpg around town, and once when purposely driving at 50mph over 40 mpg.

TR10

I presently have an almost identical car, a 2001 VW Golf which gets about the same mileage. Of course these cars do not make good tow vehicles.
In actuality the technology progress is rather phenomenal if it would be measured in horsepower only. Your Triumph likely had 40 HP. I have Opel Astra 1.4l 90HP and average (city + highway) at 40mpg. My Jetta Diesel has 100HP and gets good MPG.
My wife and I just test drove Subaru Outback with 256HP and 18-25MPG. These horsepower must to come from somewhere, so MPG suffers. As long market values HP more than MPG we will be getting low MPG cars, just physics of our Universe.
Conversations with salespeople are infuriatingly frustrating, we asked for fuel consumption and get answers in (but, but, but) horsepower.

George.
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:32 PM   #22
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I just shake my head when the Gov't mandates 54 mpg CAFE standards.
Corporate Average Fuel Economy
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Starting in 2011 the CAFE standards are newly expressed as mathematical functions depending on vehicle "footprint", a measure of vehicle size determined by multiplying the vehicle’s wheelbase by its average track width. CAFE footprint requirements are set up such that a vehicle with a bigger footprint has a lower fuel economy requirement than a vehicle with a smaller footprint.
I think they recognize that some of us require larger vehicles than others. Doesn't "Corporate Average" take into account more light duty passenger cars than heavy duty tow vehicles are sold?
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:39 PM   #23
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In actuality the technology progress is rather phenomenal if it would be measured in horsepower only. Your Triumph likely had 40 HP. I have Opel Astra 1.4l 90HP and average (city + highway) at 40mpg. My Jetta Diesel has 100HP and gets good MPG.
My wife and I just test drove Subaru Outback with 256HP and 18-25MPG. These horsepower must to come from somewhere, so MPG suffers. As long market values HP more than MPG we will be getting low MPG cars, just physics of our Universe.
Conversations with salespeople are infuriatingly frustrating, we asked for fuel consumption and get answers in (but, but, but) horsepower.

George.
Car salesmen are actually interior decorators. (Just feel that fabric. Oh this color exactly matches your eyes, ma'm. You will look SO good in this...)

DO NOT (EVER!!!) expect them to know anything mechanical about the cars. the customers don't want to know that stuff, so the salesman has long ago learned to never mention it - it makes the customer's eyes glaze over and (s)he will lose the sale. Customers want to know mileage - salesman looks on the sheet in the window and reads it to you. However HORSEPOWER SELLS!!! So they come up with some really neat numbers for that! Salesperson will open hood and ask YOU if this is a 6 or a V8?

That salesman possibly sold shoes at a department store last week/month - cars are commodities, not anything important. Color is important. Horsepower is important. Electronic gizmos are important (gotta have Blue Teeth!) Self-parking will seal the deal.

Do not expect anything to change until people change. Here in North America the sheeple will spend weeks looking for a pair of jeans, but will make the second-largest purchase of their lives based on its color and whether or not it has self parking.
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:14 AM   #24
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In the rumor mill regarding trucks, there is talk of Nissan putting a Cummins 4 cyl diesel in the Titan. Claim is 28mpg. They already have two different diesel options in the Frontier ( the model is called Navarra over there ) in Europe, Australasia, and pac rim. A four cyl and a 3.0 v-6.
I've heard at least some rumbling they will bring the four cyl Navarra/Frontier to the NA market. Dang it ! ..... I want the 3.0 V-6 with the six speed manual ! 401 lb-ft torque and 30 mpg. Sigh.
My bet is if the bring the diesel Titan to market, they will not do the smaller Frontier line as well....at least not right away.

Norm, I know you mentioned "saving x dollars" by going diesel powered. Have you considered "all" of the associated costs of it ? Higher initial buy in cost, and higher maintenance costs come to mind.

george
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Old 03-31-2012, 10:29 AM   #25
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George,

I am no expert in this area of diesel engines but am reading all I can find because we are about 2-3 years from a new vehicle. We had planned to keep our 2004 Honda for 10 years.

I think the big savings is going with a comparitively small tow vehicle. Many people on the site tow with vehicles that get 15 mpg while we get 23 mpg. Our goal is to get a vehicle capable of 30 mpg when towing and this seems to be possible with a 2 Liter diesel.

Of course many think our present tow vehicle choice is foolish. However many people tow happily with Outbacks, a similarly sized vehicle.

A primary concern is deseil vehicle reliability. Our CRV after 160,000 miles has been virtually cost free besides wear items and oil changes. If Honda introduced their diesel I'd buy it in a minute, I'm a little more cautious with VW and Mazda; I'll watch their reliability record and join their forums to get a feel for user comments.

For someone who tows 10,000 miles per year and drives another 10,000 miles the difference between 15/20 mpg and 30/42 mpg (Towing/non-towing) amounts to about $3,000 a year at around $5 per gallon. No one will be surprised if fuel exceed $5 this year and during the next decade we can only guess. At $7 a gallon this quickly moves to $5,000 a year for fuel. My goal is to be on the road for at least the next 10 years.

As to vehicle reliability, a diesel engine should out live a petrol engine. The big maintenance difference seems to be more frequent oil changes with more expensive oil. The new small diseils do not require emissions additives, at least that's the case with Honda, Mazda and VW. One thing I have against the VW is that the timing belt has to be replaced at 60,000 miles, seems foolish when Honda belts now last the life of the engine.

As to initial cost differential I suspect it will be about 10% of the cost of the vehicle, that would quickly be recovered, probably in the first year.

As to higher maintenance costs, I guess I have the Honda mindset, we haven't had any costs other than oil changes, brake pads, tires and spak plugs. Maybe I'm spoilled.

Of course, if the Honda would keep going for another 10 years, it would be cheaper to keep the Honda and certainly that is a possibility. Our 1997 is still being driven by our niece with over 300,000 miles on it.

So far on this trip we have spent $1,700 on gas averaging $3.50/gallon, by the end of the trip we will have spent $3,500-4,000, about $400 a month. These numbers may be on the low side because so far we have averaged $3.50 a gallon; our last purchase in Yuma, AZ was $3.91.

With all these thoughts I will say they are secondary to the wonderful time we're having on the road, particularly all we're learning. Yuma is a marvelously interesting town that grows a significant percentage of the country's food supply even though it gets only 3 inches of rain a year.

Loving the road......
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Old 03-31-2012, 12:33 PM   #26
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............................One thing I have against the VW is that the timing belt has to be replaced at 60,000 miles, seems foolish when Honda belts now last the life of the engine..................................
Actually the VW manual recommends to change it every 100K miles but to inspect at 80K miles. Most folks change the timing belt at 80K because work required to just check is significant and actual checking is rather doubtful.

Changing the belt has 2 steps, first to replace it and then to tune its tension in final alignment step. This second step is time consuming, a hit and miss process. It requires stretching the belt to “some degree, not too much but more than too little”, tighten bolts and check after rotating the engine twice. If special tools can’t go into right holes “easily”, repeat the process. I did it 5 times by the time I got it right. Would VW mechanics follow this process would always be my question if I would drop the car in their hands.

TDI timing belt is my major deterrent of buying VW TDI again. I think new TDI belt changing intervals are the same.

My next car, truck, or van most likely diesel will likely have "back to the past" timing chain. New Subaru Outlook 6 cylinder engine has timing chain and 4 cylinder has timing belt which is unfortunate because I would prefer timing chain on 4 cylinders which is the only one I would buy.

George.
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Old 03-31-2012, 12:38 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by gmw photos View Post
In the rumor mill regarding trucks, there is talk of Nissan putting a Cummins 4 cyl diesel in the Titan. Claim is 28mpg. They already have two different diesel options in the Frontier ( the model is called Navarra over there ) in Europe, Australasia, and pac rim. A four cyl and a 3.0 v-6.
I've heard at least some rumbling they will bring the four cyl Navarra/Frontier to the NA market. Dang it ! ..... I want the 3.0 V-6 with the six speed manual ! 401 lb-ft torque and 30 mpg. Sigh.
My bet is if the bring the diesel Titan to market, they will not do the smaller Frontier line as well....at least not right away.

Norm, I know you mentioned "saving x dollars" by going diesel powered. Have you considered "all" of the associated costs of it ? Higher initial buy in cost, and higher maintenance costs come to mind.

george

Just remember that Chrysler has an ironclad contract with Cummins that is VERY specific is stating that Cummins engines cannot appear in ANY other make of light truck sold in any market where the Dodge Rams are sold
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Old 03-31-2012, 02:48 PM   #28
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All I've got to say about this is... a Grand Cherokee with a diesel?
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