FWD or AWD? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-07-2013, 08:41 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,143
With the relatively high tongue weights of the front bath Casita 17s, reduced front traction could be an issue. If I were doing it I would want a weight distribution hitch. I towed trailers many miles with a Ford Windstar FWD and the tire scrub was a real factor... it wore out tires unusually fast.
__________________

__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 06:32 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Jared J's Avatar
 
Name: Jared
Trailer: 1984 19' scamp
Kansas
Posts: 1,610
IIRC from when my parents were looking at vehicles, that "AWD" is a joke, it only gives 10 or 15% to the rear wheels. People talked about being stuck, and the rear wheels wouldn't even move. Do some googling.

If I'm remembering it right, I surely wouldn't waste my money on crappy all wheel drive like that.

My moms CRV was ok, but the same principle, I didn't like driving it, with the "awd when it wants to be". It did ok getting around, but I didn't like the pushing in the corner on ice, steering to correct it, then having awd kick in, and heading into the oncoming lane. If you kept your hands locked and didn't try to correct it yourself, it would do fine. I just couldn't bring myself to do nothing in a slide or pushing in a corner, and wait for the computer to fix it, creeped me out.

There's a reason I bought a subaru. I believe in full time, 50-50 awd, or selectable four wheel drive, nothing in between that let's the vehicle think on it's own. That being said, my mom loved the awd in the CRV, so it has its purpose.
__________________

__________________
Jared J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 10:37 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,143
Jared, it depends on the vehicle. Both of mine (08 Highlander and 00 Mountaineer) claim to maintain a fairly even power split between front and rear axles. It's one of the reasons I chose the HL over the Rav. The Rav4 has a different system entirely that (as I understand it) sends electric power to the rear only when slippage is sensed at a front wheel.
__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 11:32 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Magee View Post
The Rav4 has a different system entirely that (as I understand it) sends electric power to the rear only when slippage is sensed at a front wheel.
That's the Hybrid (only) Highlander system. It's a slick solution, not requiring any driveshaft to the rear, but it depends on the high-power electrical system of the hybrid to work.

The RAV4 has no electric motors, but (like the majority of AWD systems) it uses a clutch to send power to the extra drive wheels (rear in this case) only when required.

The non-hybrid Highlander appears to still have a centre differential, which is the traditional way to send equal torque to both axles all the time.
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 01:01 PM   #19
Member
 
Name: Bill
Trailer: In the market
Nevada
Posts: 79
weight dist. hitch

Owners manual for our 2013 VW Tiguan says don't use a weight distribution hitch.
__________________
Chillywilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 01:11 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Carol H's Avatar
 
Name: Carol
Trailer: 22' Airstream Formerly 16' Scamp
British Columbia
Posts: 11,731
Registry
[QUOTE=Mike Magee;393809 I towed trailers many miles with a Ford Windstar FWD and the tire scrub was a real factor... it wore out tires unusually fast.[/QUOTE]

Interesting - might be something to consider when looking at a FWD vs a AWD full time vehicle. I know the Subaru I have pulled for six years with has full time AWD and its not gone through tires any faster or any unusual tire wear than the previous Subaru's I have owned that didnt tow.
Carol H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 01:14 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
frank_a's Avatar
 
Name: Frank
Trailer: 2012 ParkLiner #006
New York
Posts: 2,204
If tire scrub occurs at all, tow with something else, or change the tow equation somehow. I don't think tire scrub has anything to do with FWD or AWD or 4WD, it's a weight/suspension problem. If I couldn't change the tongue weight, I'd get air shocks.

Frank
__________________
frank_a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 02:12 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Jon Vermilye's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21
Oswego, NY
Posts: 1,407
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian B-P View Post
That's the Hybrid (only) Highlander system. It's a slick solution, not requiring any driveshaft to the rear, but it depends on the high-power electrical system of the hybrid to work.

The RAV4 has no electric motors, but (like the majority of AWD systems) it uses a clutch to send power to the extra drive wheels (rear in this case) only when required.

The non-hybrid Highlander appears to still have a centre differential, which is the traditional way to send equal torque to both axles all the time.
You do have the ability to lock the rear wheels of the RAV4 in 4 wheel drive with a dashboard push button. Stays locked until you hit 25MPH, or switch it off. Very handy for driving on wet grass, etc.
Jon Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 03:19 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 1975 Boler
Posts: 106
Registry
This seems pertinent to comparing the different AWD claims by manufacturers.

The truth behind the badge - All-wheel-drive systems and how they work (photos) - CNET Reviews

I have a Subaru, and know that it isn't locked into 50/50 AWD - I believe I read somewhere that automatic transmissioned Subby's can send as little as 10% to the rear most of the time - manual transmissioned can send as little as 20%. I don't recall why there is a difference. It could also depend on the model year. I have a 1998 Forester. I can't say that the AWD gives me any big advantages by itself.

I would say the BIGGEST advantage I have experienced for rain/sleet/snow driving is having snow tires.
__________________
Evan Friesen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 03:41 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Jared J's Avatar
 
Name: Jared
Trailer: 1984 19' scamp
Kansas
Posts: 1,610
Subaru starts out at 50/50, and is that way most of the time. Yes it can vary it, that's the point. Many "awd" systems will only deliver 10-20% to the rear wheels, which (IMHO) isn't true awd. I don't know how you haven't seen an advantage to awd. I went to park in wet grass at a show, and had to drive down a path that was had a steep slope above and below it, with parking on top of the upper slole. A half ton chevy, and f350 were taking runs to get up the slope, in 4wd. I drive down the bottom slope to get around them, put the car in reverse, went right up the bottom slope, the level path, and right to the top of the other slope and parked. It never spun a tire, and plowed a path with the trailer hitch.

You should have seen the looks on the faces of those guys when I walked past them, still trying to ram their way up the hill, priceless.

Again, I don't think I could justify the cost of awd for only 10-20% of the power.

Edit: it looks like they upgraded the awd system on the 2013 traverse, from what I can find. When my parents were looking a few years ago, many owners reported being stuck and the rear wheels not moving. Now it sounds like it can get a 50/50 split.
__________________
Jared J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 09:06 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Radar1's Avatar
 
Name: Dave (and/or John)
Trailer: Scamp 16 SD std layout 6
Georgia
Posts: 767
Registry
We tow our 16' Scamp with either a RWD Dodge Dakota, or our AWD Subaru Outback depending on how much "stuff" we are taking. Both do well, but I love the extra traction that's available on our AWD Subaru when we are driving on gravel or wet roads, or maneuvering in a gravel camping spot. We did have a popup once that we had to tow with our FWD Ford Focus cross country due to a move, and we noticed that if the roads are wet, then the front wheels tend to spin a bit when you start from a stop, which would also be an issue with wet grass or gravel.
__________________
John-Dave and Marilyn
Sharpsburg, GA
04 Dodge Dakota V-8 and 17 Dodge Durango V-6
radar1-scamping.blogspot.com
Radar1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 09:11 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Radar1's Avatar
 
Name: Dave (and/or John)
Trailer: Scamp 16 SD std layout 6
Georgia
Posts: 767
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carol H View Post
I tow with a Subaru AWD no problems. In fact it gives an amazing solid tow even in high wind conditions.

I have to go up mountains at all hours of the day and night often unplowed and have found the Subaru to be one of the best in snow - yup have tried a number of other vehicles - SUV's and P/u's. Subaru has what they call a Symmetrical All Wheel drive which as I understand may be a little different than some of the other AWD systems as it does send power to all wheels simultaneously all the time but as mentioned does increase the power to which ever wheels have the best traction in slipper conditions. Down side is due to this AWD system the gas mileage for an engine of its size isnt the best.
Consumers Reports just tested the 2014 Subaru Forester with CVT and rated it as getting the best mileage of any of the small SUVs they tested, even though it has AWD.
The downside is that they downgraded the tow rating to 1500 lbs this year.
__________________
John-Dave and Marilyn
Sharpsburg, GA
04 Dodge Dakota V-8 and 17 Dodge Durango V-6
radar1-scamping.blogspot.com
Radar1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 05:38 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
frank_a's Avatar
 
Name: Frank
Trailer: 2012 ParkLiner #006
New York
Posts: 2,204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radar1 View Post
We tow our 16' Scamp with either a RWD Dodge Dakota, or our AWD Subaru Outback depending on how much "stuff" we are taking. Both do well, but I love the extra traction that's available on our AWD Subaru when we are driving on gravel or wet roads, or maneuvering in a gravel camping spot. We did have a popup once that we had to tow with our FWD Ford Focus cross country due to a move, and we noticed that if the roads are wet, then the front wheels tend to spin a bit when you start from a stop, which would also be an issue with wet grass or gravel.
Boy, we have the same '08 Outback as you guys, and it has a tow capacity of like 2700#s, vs. my '09 4 cyl standard shift GMC Canyon with a tow capacity of 2100#s. We tried pulling our Sunline T-1550 with the Outback once, and never again. We tow it with the truck now, and the truck handles it much better, even though we're over the tow capacity! Maybe the Outback would tow a streamlined egg with less problem. We're looking to trade the truck in on a tow vehicle with larger tow capacity, and keep the Outback a few more years.

Frank
__________________
frank_a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 08:41 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Radar1's Avatar
 
Name: Dave (and/or John)
Trailer: Scamp 16 SD std layout 6
Georgia
Posts: 767
Registry
I was pleasantly surprised when I tried towing our Scamp the first time with our Outback. That was more of a test to see if it could handle it empty, and it did well. I think the Scamps's aerodynamics definitely help since drag is a major factor at highway speeds. We do need to keep the weight down on the tongue by removing one of the propane tanks, but fully loaded (empty grey and black tanks but full fresh water) our Scamp comes in at 2460 lbs, which is lower than the Subaru 2700 limit. If we have heavier loads in the tow vehicle or are facing any big mountains we use the truck.
__________________

__________________
John-Dave and Marilyn
Sharpsburg, GA
04 Dodge Dakota V-8 and 17 Dodge Durango V-6
radar1-scamping.blogspot.com
Radar1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Traction problem with FWD MC1 Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 6 03-05-2013 12:00 PM
towing with Ford Flex AWD? artspe Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 2 02-01-2011 06:06 PM
Towing an FWD vehicle Mike Price Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 0 01-03-2010 05:22 PM
FWD Tow Vehicle?: Thanks Legacy Posts Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 9 11-12-2002 03:42 PM
FWD Tow Vehicles? Legacy Posts Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 15 11-09-2002 06:39 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.