Handling issues (1979 Trillium / 2000 Subaru outback) - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-11-2014, 05:12 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
May Not Be A Good Idea....

The construction grade "U" clamps are for static loads and are not designed for the constant loading and unloading that they will get from the drawbar stressing up and down.

At the very least I suspect that the bolts will stretch and you won't have any dampening, in a worst case you might break off the bolts and the tires on your rig might be smart enough to catch the broken parts in their treads before they fly away!

This is something where the RV designed part seems called for the first time. I've been using the same one for almost 3 years without problems.
__________________

__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2014, 06:07 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
floyd's Avatar
 
Name: Floyd
Trailer: 2004 13 ft Scamp Custom Deluxe
IllAnnoy
Posts: 6,043
Registry
I would say that the bow in the tongue should probably be straightened, but since you have a single axle it is doubtful that that is the cause of your handling problem. you likely have a bit of dogtracking which would be barely noticable in the rearview mirror while towing in a straight line.
I doubt it, but if it dogtracks enough, it might act up a little since it would ride the "track grooves" in the road a little to one side compared to the TV...
That might cause it to act a little squirrelly, but then again it probably has a different track than the TV anyway.
My guess is that someone jackknifed the trailer while backing up.
__________________

__________________
floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2014, 06:20 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Jared J's Avatar
 
Name: Jared
Trailer: 1984 19' scamp
Kansas
Posts: 1,610
Good luck stretching a square bolt that size with one of our trailers. The wood shims are certainly a quick way to tell if you need that clamp or not. Then again, my shims have been in there for several years now, so I don't care to buy a clamp I don't need.

If I was going that far, I would just modify by adding jam bolts to the receiver hitch like the one I did for my tractor, so I didn't have some extra doohickey to deal with.
__________________
Jared J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2014, 07:24 PM   #18
Junior Member
 
Name: Stephen
Trailer: Trillium
Saskatchewan
Posts: 11
Hey, I love this forum! Thanks for the help and advice (including several PMs)

Here's some info:
- The negative camber of the tires was confirmed by the (n-1) owner
- The trailer is probably tongue-light, without propane or a battery box. It was used as a Craven Special for the last 4-5 years, so it was not towed long distances (Craven is a large outdoor country music festival, held in a muddy field). A Trillium is far too glamorous to be a Craven Special!
- Other than the bend in the tongue, the frame looks good (solid tube frame, no obvious cracks or rust). I had looked at a beat-up 1972 Boler previously, so I know what an ugly cracked crappy frame looks like.

Here's what I've done:
- I've take the trailer to a frame shop (A Line Frame, in Saskatoon) that specializes in frame straightening for big rigs, with a side line for camping trailers. They've confirmed problems with the camber and the wheel alignment. They inspected the axle externally and thought the rubber looked good, but you never can really tell.
- I will have them straighten the tongue and replace the receiver. I've also decided to replace the axle with a 2200# axle, with brakes.

Yeah, I won't get my money out of the trailer, but that isn't my primary concern.

I'm guessing that the "porposing" motion is what tongue-light feels like. Easy problem to fix, and it's good to know "in my bones" what that feels like.! I will be able to confirm and fix this once I get the trailer back.

I will update when I know more, in about a month.

Cheers,
Stephen
__________________
FlatlandFlyFisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2014, 08:04 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Mike Magee's Avatar
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,142
Some of that motion you're feeling may be a function of the relatively light shocks or struts in the Subaru. Any vehicle that has a very carlike ride (including my Highlander) will jiggle (or porpoise, or whatever one wishes to call it) more than a vehicle with heavier suspension (and consequent trucklike feel).

Hopefully once you get the tongue weight up to about 150-175 lbs it will be better. But your ride while towing will never be as smooth as non-towing; some of that up-and-down (forward to back) motion will always be there as you go over bumps.
__________________
How much time do we have left? 2 Chr. 7:14
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2014, 08:23 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Carol H's Avatar
 
Name: Carol
Trailer: 22' Airstream Formerly 16' Scamp
British Columbia
Posts: 11,731
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared J View Post
Good luck stretching a square bolt that size with one of our trailers. .
The U bolts they sell at hardware stores come in various sizes as well as grades/strength. The link posted wasn't actually the type I was thinking of. I know a number of RV'ers who use ones purchased from a hardware store & have used one on a hitch mount bike rake to stop the rattle as well as on a boat trailer.

The type I was think of looks pretty well the same as the anti rattle Roadmaster Quiet Hitch that trailer sells for $23.
Carol H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 02:45 PM   #21
Member
 
Jane in California's Avatar
 
Name: Jane
Trailer: Trillium
California
Posts: 30
Camber and hitch problems/questions

From Bob Miller:

1. I would pass on the wooden shims idea. There is a "U" shaped clamp available that will take all of the play out of the drawbar/receiver connection. I never leave home without mine.

2.`You have a 35 year old trailer. The hitch could be worn, damaged or, at the very least, needs the ball clamp adjusted for a snug grip on the ball. As long as it's in the shop it might just be a good idea to get a new hitch installed at the same time. (I did)

3.Is there a chance that you are using a 1-7/8" Ball with a 2" hitch? It's happened to a number of us."

From Jane in California:

I am wondering about the camber too. It feels OK when towing, but when just sitting there, the wheels do appear to be tilted. I had the axle checked, and the shop said it was straight and true. But is it?

And have also experienced this bumping and jumping bit. Attributed it to the trailer being totally empty, but now I'd like to try those clamps. Can someone describe where to put them?

I had the bearings packed and the tires changed before I drove my trailer home. I am getting two different opinions....do I need to have specific trailer tires, or are passenger tires OK? My Trillium weighs about 1000 pounds.

My ball does fit my hitch... 1 7/8". But am considering having the hitch replaced and getting a 2" ball. Will this make for a better tow?

I have the feeling I didn't post this correctly. Still a newbie. Sorry!
__________________
Jane in California is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 02:57 PM   #22
Junior Member
 
Name: Stephen
Trailer: Trillium
Saskatchewan
Posts: 11
It's been a long time since I first posted. An update:

a.) I replaced the axle on the trailer with a new axle, with brakes. This reduced the porposing behaviour, but it did not go away entirely.

b.) When the axle was replaced, the tongue was replaced as well, to remove the bent section. This changed the hitch ball diameter to 2" (a 1 7/8 wasn't quickly available).

I recommend A-line Frame in Saskatoon (A-Line | Frame & Alignment). They did a very good job on the tongue replacement and axle replacement

c.) The Subaru was pretty good for the task. With a 2.5 L engine, I did have some overheating issues if I pushed too hard.

d.) The trailer was good for the season, once I fixed the gas leaks (flared fitting at connection to fridge and jammed stove valve), reduced bug holes, and put more caulking.

e.) The Subaru has been deemed beyond the point of fixing (306 k), so it has been retired. I think my new(er) Ford F-150 will be up to the task. I didn't want to take the Trillium into the mountains with the Subaru, but we'll do exactly that next summer.
__________________
FlatlandFlyFisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 03:20 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Towing Questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane in California View Post
From Bob Miller:

1. I would pass on the wooden shims idea. There is a "U" shaped clamp available that will take all of the play out of the drawbar/receiver connection. I never leave home without mine.

2.`You have a 35 year old trailer. The hitch could be worn, damaged or, at the very least, needs the ball clamp adjusted for a snug grip on the ball. As long as it's in the shop it might just be a good idea to get a new hitch installed at the same time. (I did)

3.Is there a chance that you are using a 1-7/8" Ball with a 2" hitch? It's happened to a number of us."

From Jane in California:

I am wondering about the camber too. It feels OK when towing, but when just sitting there, the wheels do appear to be tilted. I had the axle checked, and the shop said it was straight and true. But is it?

And have also experienced this bumping and jumping bit. Attributed it to the trailer being totally empty, but now I'd like to try those clamps. Can someone describe where to put them?

I had the bearings packed and the tires changed before I drove my trailer home. I am getting two different opinions....do I need to have specific trailer tires, or are passenger tires OK? My Trillium weighs about 1000 pounds.

My ball does fit my hitch... 1 7/8". But am considering having the hitch replaced and getting a 2" ball. Will this make for a better tow?

I have the feeling I didn't post this correctly. Still a newbie. Sorry!
There are several "U" clamps similar to this one out there. Mine had a single bar rather than the plate, but works about the same. There is a LOT of stress there so don't be tempted in trying a hardware store clamp, it will just break or come loose.

Tire choice opens a whole bag of worms. Lets say that ST (trailer use only) tires were developed for a reason. I understand that they have stiffer sidewalls. And it's what I have always used for my trailers.

A 2" ball won't tow any differently, but it will set you up to match more trailers and other TV's in the future.

Just keep those questions a coming.....
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 05:18 PM   #24
Member
 
Jane in California's Avatar
 
Name: Jane
Trailer: Trillium
California
Posts: 30
I can't seem to find a U-clamp in a 1 7/8" size. Maybe I will switch out to a 2" ball after all. Now if only I knew where all this money was coming from!!
__________________
Jane in California is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 05:44 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
It's not the size of the hitch ball, it's the size of the receivers outside dimension.
It clamps the drawbar to the receiver to reduce slack in the connection. Here's a link.


Roadmaster Quiet Hitch for 2" Trailer Hitches Roadmaster Hitch Accessories RM-061


This is the exact one I use
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 10:39 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
David B.'s Avatar
 
Name: Dave & Paula Brown
Trailer: Lil Snoozy
Arizona
Posts: 1,717
Registry
I have had great success using a hitch vice. Look here.
Hitch tightener: no wobble, anti rattle stabilizer device for hitch accessories
Good Luck
Dave & Paula
__________________
David B. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2014, 10:58 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Dbybe's Avatar
 
Name: Donald
Trailer: Happier Camper HC1 pulled with a 2011 Subaru Outback 4cyl CVT
California
Posts: 106
Hitch clamp to eliminate rattle

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carol H View Post
The U bolts they sell at hardware stores come in various sizes as well as grades/strength. The link posted wasn't actually the type I was thinking of. I know a number of RV'ers who use ones purchased from a hardware store & have used one on a hitch mount bike rake to stop the rattle as well as on a boat trailer.

The type I was think of looks pretty well the same as the anti rattle Roadmaster Quiet Hitch that trailer sells for $23.
I use this same hitch clamp from etrailer. It spans accross the joint between the receiver and the hitch itself. When sinched down there is no play at all and wonderfully, no rattle.
__________________

__________________
Dbybe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
trillium


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Towing with a Subaru Outback james cronn Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 0 04-16-2009 04:13 PM
Towing Casita Freedom Deluxe With Subaru Outback james cronn Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 18 04-13-2009 09:24 PM
Subaru Outback pulling 13' Trillium Marv Watson Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 30 01-19-2009 05:21 PM
2007 Subaru Outback + 13ft Scamp = 22mpg Mikeny Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 13 07-09-2008 09:18 AM
Subaru Forrester with Team Trillium Outback Brian T Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 12 05-13-2007 12:27 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.