Hot Trailer Tires - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-31-2007, 09:58 AM   #15
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Generally, what happens is that as the tire overheats the rubber actually begins to revert (in a very loose sense it "melts") and it looses it's adhesion (ply to ply and even cord material to the rubber it's embedded into). Then inflation and centripetal force causes the tire to come apart.

Confusing this somewhat is that if the tire runs flat the wheel rim can cut the body ply material. Broken cords are usually a secondary effect not a cause.

I'm not saying that broken cords can't cause a failure. I'm just saying that overheating in the fashion described doesn't fail cords.
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Old 10-31-2007, 11:48 AM   #16
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Steve, You really struck a cord with that post.
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Old 10-31-2007, 12:42 PM   #17
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Steve, You really struck a cord with that post.
Groan!
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Old 10-31-2007, 10:37 PM   #18
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Groan!
Hi: According to my thinking a good visual/sensual inspection along with a tire pressure gauge and proper inflation rates makes good trailering sense. While changing over from cracked bias ply to new radial trailer tires was a good time to do a bearing repack and the $20.00 my R.V. dealer charged+ $5.00 for new seals was a bargain. He also used a very neat little device(Grease cup) to drop the bearings into and force the grease through the bearings. Something I do not have... now all I have to do is keep track of towed miles and do a repack every 5000KM. thats Canadian EH!!!
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie
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Old 11-01-2007, 12:29 AM   #19
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Hi Maggie,
As usuall Alf has some good advice.
Get a good tire gauge, make sure your tire are inflated to the proper pressure and HAVE your wheel bearings packed by a mechanic.
Problems never happen close to home. If you do not pack the bearings properly You will probably be 7 hours for home with cranky kids when the wheel beraings go bad. It is not only inconvenient but it can be a very expensive proposition. You could possibly damage a spindle and then you would probably have to replace the entire axel.
The 20 or 30 dollars you spend is cheap insurance.
Get a good tire guage, make sure your tires are in good shape and properly inflated, have your bearings packed by a pro and then the next thing you should do is RELAX and have fun enjoying being out with your family.

John
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Old 11-02-2007, 11:24 PM   #20
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Under inflated?

Sorry if this sounds really dumb . . .

So, hubby went out and looked at the tires. It says max tire pressure is 50 psi cold. The right tire was 22 and the left was 26 cold. Would that have been under inflated? It says nothing about what is too low.

What is a good tire pressure to have them inflated to if max is 50? Should they be at 50? 40? What is the proper pressure?

I just bought a digital tire gauge at Costco.


I priced a repack and it was $110. Yikes, I like your price better John (20-30)! But yes, I think I'd rather have it done.
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Old 11-02-2007, 11:54 PM   #21
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Quote:
Under inflated?

Sorry if this sounds really dumb . . .

So, hubby went out and looked at the tires. It says max tire pressure is 50 psi cold. The right tire was 22 and the left was 26 cold. Would that have been under inflated? It says nothing about what is too low.

What is a good tire pressure to have them inflated to if max is 50? Should they be at 50? 40? What is the proper pressure?

I just bought a digital tire gauge at Costco.


I priced a repack and it was $110. Yikes, I like your price better John (20-30)! But yes, I think I'd rather have it done.
Hi: My repack was done at the same time as I was changing the tires over to radials so would be cheaper then...but shop around the R.V. dealers in your area. I run the pressure at 45 lbs. cold as they will heat up on the highway. Do not exceed the max. pressure for the tires. Most of all enjoy the trip and have fun trailering!!!
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie
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Old 11-03-2007, 01:07 AM   #22
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Under inflated?
I priced a repack and it was $110. Yikes, I like your price better John (20-30)! But yes, I think I'd rather have it done.
Did you call an RV store for the price?
I took my trailer to the local auto repair shop to have it done.
Labor was $30.00 but I forgot the seals were $11.00.If you can have any work done at a place other than an RV dealer you will save money.
It sounds like you got a Camping World price.

Enjoy,
John
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Old 11-03-2007, 06:33 AM   #23
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Under inflated?

Sorry if this sounds really dumb . . .

So, hubby went out and looked at the tires. It says max tire pressure is 50 psi cold. The right tire was 22 and the left was 26 cold. Would that have been under inflated? It says nothing about what is too low.

What is a good tire pressure to have them inflated to if max is 50? Should they be at 50? 40? What is the proper pressure?
The correct pressure depends on what tire size you have. The best answer would be to know exactly what your trailer weighs on each side of the axle. Then you'd look up the load capacity for that tire and pick the pressure that carries the load. Any tire store I'm sure would look up the needed inflation for you.

Different people travel with different amounts of stuff packed in their trailer so your needed pressure may be different. Certainly it's a good starting point but on balance, and until you someday learn what your trailer weighs, it would probably be best to inflate to 50 psi when the tire is at ambient temperature.

Another approach would be that if you know what the axle rating of your trailer is (there should be a GVWR label fastened to the frame somewhere) you could use that weight number to look up the tire pressure. These labels don't always last so yours may not be still there.

Yet another approach would be to call the factory. They should know what the axle rating was for your trailer and could suggest a pressure. However, manufacturers tend to underestimate the weights of trailers so I return to my first recommendation to inflate to 50 psi if you have the original tire size on the trailer.

Lastly, tires don't heal. If your tires were in the mid-twenties when you were towing then I'm pretty sure you were under inflated. (So much depends on what tire size you have.) Even after upping the inflation, keep an eye on them through your trips. I'm not suggesting you become obsessed with them, but just take a quick walk around when you stop for gas or lunch. And check the pressure in your spare at home before you start off. You may not have done any lasting damage but eye-ballin' the tires once in awhile is a good idea anytime.
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Old 11-03-2007, 12:06 PM   #24
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Quote:
I priced a repack and it was $110.
The RV place I take my Fiber Stream to charges over $240 because of the double axles. They include a brake inspection and adjustment with that.
Since that area of expertise is not in my repertoire, I feel it is a good investment for me.

The company [b]I work for charges my customers over $100 per hour for my labor; there is a lot of other overhead besides my pay and benefits they have to cover.
What goes around comes around.
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Old 11-03-2007, 12:52 PM   #25
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$20 to $25 per wheel is more than enough for a repack and brake adjustment. In the case of 4 wheels it should not be more than $100.

It is my opinion that you are being riped off.
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Old 11-03-2007, 06:50 PM   #26
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Quote:
Another approach would be that if you know what the axle rating of your trailer is (there should be a GVWR label fastened to the frame somewhere) you could use that weight number to look up the tire pressure. These labels don't always last so yours may not be still there.
If you can't read the GVWR label, you can usually crawl under the trailer and find the axle tag or stenciling which should be there. I suspect the axle manf has a legal requirement to label it, just as the trailer manf has the GVWR requirement.

Safety-wise and tire life wise, it's better to err on the high pressure side than the low.

A field-expedient way to determine a good pressure is to mark a line in chalk across the tires and drive it around the block. If the outsides of the line are erased, the pressures are low; if the center is gone the pressure is high. But that may change at higher speeds with spinning forces working on the tires.

However, getting a trailer weighed should be on one's list so one can determine TPs and also set the proper tongue weight!!
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